Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Tuesday
November 26

Just one week in Honduras changed her whole future

By Alessandra Forero

Chelsea Higgins works alongside fellow students at the children's "charla," she created in Honduras with the Global Medical Brigades.

Just a year ago sophomore, Chelsea Higgins, an anthropology major following a pre-medical track, came to Boston University not as an aspiring doctor but as a neuroscience major. But after spending a week in Honduras with the BU Global Medical Brigades, Chelsea’s entire perception about global medicine changed.

Working in Honduras alongside other students from BU, Chelsea held hands with the children she was helping and cared for women who’d never had a personal medical consultation. The goal of the trip was to offer medical assessments, dental screenings and free medication to both adults and children in the region who did not have access to healthcare.

It took just one semester at Boston University to prepare for her life-changing trip. Chelsea and a small group of BU students took the initiative to raise the funds needed through empowered.org to travel to Honduras. Also before her trip, she designed a curriculum for a children’s “charla,” meaning “chat” in Spanish. Chelsea created this curriculum, which included skits, songs and dances, as a way to have a fun and educational conversation with children about everyday dental hygiene.

Through her time in Honduras Chelsea realized she wanted to study a major that incorporated cultural sensitivity and awareness into the medical world. Upon returning to BU, she switched her major to anthropology to help address some of the challenges she saw her clients facing.

One of the greatest challenges she observed while in Honduras, which was also one of her favorite learning experiences, “was understanding Honduran perspectives and ideals while trying to assist patients. Recognizing the patient’s point of view is equally as important as supplying the medication,” she said.

While Chelsea enjoyed learning about medicine and volunteering at the clinic, her favorite part of the trip was interacting with the Honduran people. “Because I speak Spanish, I was able to have long conversations with locals and learn so much about the challenges not just the patients, but their country is facing, such as illegal immigration or drug trafficking. I learned, without the slant of the media, what these people really see and how that affects their medical needs.”

While she was passionate and proud of her volunteer experience in Honduras, Chelsea shared her realization, “You can’t fix it all in four days, it’s a long process. It takes a tremendous amount of commitment over many years. That only pushed me more to want to pursue global medicine for my future.”

When asked to give her best advice to aspiring medical students, Chelsea said, “Do the pre-med track and major in something you enjoy, something you are passionate about.”

Boston University encourages pre-medical and pre-dental students to create their own undergraduate pathway, as they work toward their intended career, through whichever major they desire. Many BU students major in traditional programs, such as biology or biomedical engineering, while others branch out and explore majors as varied as international relations, psychology, or economics – all while still pursuing a medical degree.

This semester Chelsea is back at BU hoping to use her larger humanitarian perspective on medicine and love for working with people to keep pushing herself in global medicine.

For Chelsea, the choice to come to Boston and attend BU was the first step in breaking out of her comfort zone and experiencing new things through academics, her experience in Honduras, and the people she has met along the way.

“BU has pushed me outside my comfort zone like I never had expected it would. It was a combination of all these things that lead me to see a future in global medicine that would have seemed out of reach in the past. I’m encouraged by watching my peers break boundaries in their fields of interest, which continuously inspires me to do the same,” she said.

 

 

Monday
March 5

Study Abroad Series: An aspiring teacher goes Down Under

By Stacey Milton

From Boston Harbor to Sydney Harbor: A trip half way around the world for the experience of a life time

Writing & photos by Maggie Tittler (SED’12)

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

Going to Sydney, Australia to teach abroad was probably one of my crazier, more impulsive decisions. After only three days of living in the southern hemisphere, I visited my school, and two days later I was in my classroom with 26 nine and ten-year-old boys and girls. I would say 99% of the people you talk to who have gone abroad will rave about their experience ad nauseam. I will tell you immediately that I am one of those people. Instead of boring you with every story, experience, and adventure I have chosen a tasteful collection of my photos with a short description of the adventure associated with each. If you have more questions for me about my abroad experience, you can contact me at MaggieT@bu.edu. Also, to see more of my adventures, feel free to check out my blog from my travels:http://maggietittler.tumblr.com/.

Sunrise over Boston

Sunrise over Boston

Sydney

Sydney

Naturally, the first thing I wanted to do when I got to Australia was kidnap a kangaroo and/or koala. Though I never brought them back to my apartment, I did get to pet them pretty early on in my trip. We went to Featherdale Wildlife Park and saw our fair share of animals native to Australia.

Sleepy koala

Sleepy koala

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With my new friend, the kangaroo

I spent four days in Cairns (pronounces “cans”), which is in the North East of Australia. They were probably the four most consecutively dangerous days of my life and included rainforests, the Great Barrier Reef, snorkeling, scuba diving, bungee jumping, and sky diving. My parents were not thrilled when they found out after the fact, but my students loved learning about my change in potential and kinetic energy and the forces involved as I flew up to 14,000ft and jumped!

Just hangin' around

Just hangin' around

Great Barrier Reef

Great Barrier Reef

Not having a bit of fun. None at all.

Not having a bit of fun. None at all.

Treetops of the rainforest

Treetops of the rainforest

My experience in the classroom was nothing short of incredible. My teacher and supervisor were so supportive and gave me some great constructive criticism. The school where I taught has a tight-knit school community, and I met some inspirational people I will bring with me to the teaching adventures that await me post-graduation.

With my Sydney students

With my Sydney students

Going abroad to Australia and traveling after to New Zealand and Fiji gave me incredible opportunities to work on my photography, which I hope to one day consider a professional hobby that I can include in both my classroom and my personal life. My last two weeks consisted of a phone-less and relatively direction-less trip to New Zealand followed by Fiji. I knew I was going to get to the south island and travel for about a week, I just did not really know how. Once I made it there, I took the Magic Bus down the south island, stopping at a new destination each day. I met a wonderful group of people from every walk of life, from bee-keepers to environmentalists to musicians to doctors and lawyers, all ranging from 21 to 60 years of age. Finally, I caught a plane from Fiji on the 21st of December (at 11pm) and landed in Los Angeles on the 21st of December (noon).

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As my parents helped to move me in to my apartment for my final semester at Boston University, my mom asked me if I thought the experience abroad was worth it and if I would recommend it to future students. Without hesitation, I told her study abroad should be required for all students. Going abroad is not only a great way to spend one of your eight semesters, but it is a temporary (or for some a permanent) life change that every student should take advantage of. The experience provides an alternative perspective, encourages an open mind and a new spin on the world around us. It is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to explore, dream, and discover.

Thursday
January 26

The Weekender

By kede

10-2962-ROCKCLIMB-030You’ve probably already read or heard a lot about what life inside the classroom might be like at BU. But what would your weekends look like while living along Comm. Ave?

BU Today (a daily publication that you should definitely follow as you await decisions or prepare to come to campus) recently began offering the Weekender, a weekly listing that will run each Thursday of area happenings both on and off campus. It’s a great way to get a sense of all the hilarious, silly, interesting, funny, and thought-provoking things happening just steps from the dorm rooms on campus.

Where else can you see Claire Danes accept the Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year Award, go rock climbing and check out the “A Day in Pompeii” exhibit at the Museum of Science – all in one weekend?! Many of these events are annual favorites among current BU students.

Go ahead, read The Weekender: January 26 – 29 and follow them on Twitter (@butoday) while you’re there. It’s the best way to get in touch with life at BU (besides visiting campus in person).

Tuesday
January 17

Dr. King would be proud

By kede

Speaking of alumnus Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I would venture to say he’d be very proud of the incredible work done by BU’s Admissions Student Diversity Board (ASDB). This group of bright and ambitious students are helping to ensure diversity on campus at BU by actively recruiting new students from multicultural communities. They belive that a diverse community creates a better education, inside and outside the classroom.

And they’re having a lot of fun along the way. Check out their student-run blog which highlights some of their incredible experiences together here at BU – from studying abroad in Italy to attending an International Healthcare Gala.

If you have any questions on how you might fit in at BU, don’t be shy! Feel free to ask any of them questions on the diverse opportunities offered at BU by emailing asdb@bu.edu.

About ASDB: The Admissions Student Diversity Board (ASDB) helps keep us one of America’s most diverse centers of learning by actively recruiting from multicultural communities. This student organization works with Admissions to increase enrollment and enrich the experience of African-American/Black, Latino/Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and Native American students at BU.

Wednesday
January 11

Gourmet grilled cheese, cupcakes & banh mi…who’s ready for lunch?

By Stacey Milton

Food trucks have been popping up all over Boston recently, and many have landed right on our campus. They are perfect for a quick, cheap bite between classes, or simply a delicious option for lunch (or breakfast, or dinner!). I can vouch for the delicious sandwiches from Clover and the to-die-for grilled cheese offered by Roxy’s, and I’ve made it a New Year’s resolution to try the rest.

Check out the awesome feature that BU Today did on these mobile purveyors of tasty culinary treats, including where and when you can find them on our campus. If you’re planning a visit to campus sometime soon, be sure to save some time (and room in your belly) to check them out!

Tuesday
January 10

The life-cycle of a BU application

By Stacey Milton

Although campus is still relatively quiet, and classes won’t begin for another week, there is a lot of activity happening here in the BU Admissions office. Over the next couple months, our staff will read and review over 40,000 applications for the Class of 2016. So how do we do it?

Well, there is a lot of coffee involved (and luckily, a Starbucks and a Panera across the street). This time of year, we spend most every day reading applications, sometimes in the office; sometimes at home (which makes my cat very happy). In fact, there’s a pretty good chance your application could be initially reviewed by someone sitting at home in their pajamas!

When we receive an application from the Common App, it is  uploaded into our system, where it is then matched with all other required forms – recommendation letters, transcripts, school reports – and any test scores that we may have received. Eventually, these are all matched together with a student’s name, and a University ID is issued to the file.

Once a file is complete, it enters our online reading system so that we can begin the review process. As you may already know, BU Admissions reads regionally, and so we each tend to focus on our own state, or states, initially. I work specifically with PA and DE, and I’m thrilled to see the names of students that I remember meeting this past fall while visiting high schools in my region. We also read for all nine undergraduate schools and colleges.

After an initial review has been completed, a few things can happen. A decision may be recommended and the file will be looked at in committee, where several members of the board of admissions will discuss the applicant and come to a final decision. Or, if an applicant is clearly a strong candidate for admission, we may be able to make a final decision and move along to the next. With each file we review, we also may be considering an applicant for a scholarship or our highly selective Kilachand Honors College. Applicants to our College of Fine Arts receive an initial academic review and are also discussed in committee once an artistic evaluation (based on a portfolio or audition) is completed.

The process of reviewing applications is often referred to as an “art, rather than a science.” This is especially true for BU Admissions, where our applicant pool is predominantly made up of academically impressive students. Thus, we are attempting to build a class of individuals who will not only thrive as BU students, but who will truly enjoy their experience, and who really want to be here. We are thinking, “Would this student contribute to the classroom discussion?” or “Would they get involved with an a cappella group, the Community Service Center, or take advantage of research opportunities?” and one of my favorites, “Would you want this student as your roommate?

Believe it or not, it’s also a lot of fun, which makes the long days and slight eye twitch bearable. My colleagues and I look forward to reading many, many more applications over the next couple months as we complete the class. And we all look forward to April, when we get to leave our offices, rejoin the world and meet all of the wonderful students who have been offered a place in BU’s Class of 2016!

Thursday
December 22

Application deadline extended!

By jckeller

Application deadline extended to January 3, 2012

You’ve got an extra two days to get your applications in—we are extending the deadline for freshman applications to January 3, 2012!

And now we are signing off for the holidays; the BU Admissions office will close at 5 p.m. on Friday, December 23. If you have any questions, please call us before then. We will reopen at 9 a.m. on January 3, 2012.

Happy holidays, and see you in the new year!

Thursday
December 22

Sounds of the season, from one of BU’s many a cappella groups

By Stacey Milton

Check out BU Today’s series of a cappella performances from The Castle (one our most historic, and beautiful, buildings). Who knows, maybe you’ll be singing with them this time next year!

Wednesday
December 21

Congratulations to the first members of BU’s Class of 2016!

By kede

Last week was the week so many students who applied Early Admission were painfully waiting for. On behalf of the entire admissions team, we want to extend a heartfelt congratulations to the newest members of the Class of 2016. You worked hard, and earned your spot as a BU Terrier. Below are couple of our favorite comments that new students shared with us on Facebook and Twitter.

@mollwass: OFFICIALLY A TERRIER. CANT BREATHE @BU_Tweets @ApplyToBU BU ’16!!!!

@MarcyTanner: My daughter got into #BostonUniversity!! w00t!

Wednesday
December 21

Admissions Tip #8: Poofread

By Jonathan

Proofread everything you send us. (Did I really write “poofread”?)

It’s not a text message, it’s not Facebook chat, it is your college application. Or, in some cases, it’s simply an e-mail to an admissions counselor – who might be helping to make a decision on your application. As a member of the Board of Admissions, I read hundreds of applications and e-mails and am always amazed at the frequency with which I find careless errors.  This week, I read an application and the very first word of the student’s essay was misspelled.  If you want to grab our attention with a great opening sentence, it’s best to at least get the spelling right.

This fall, I was traveling in California visiting high schools and attending college fairs when I stopped at a store for a quick shopping trip.  Towards the back, I found this sign:

Quality

This is a great metaphor for common pitfalls in the application.  Telling us about your involvement with the National Honors Society is great; but that organization doesn’t exist (did you catch it? It’s the National Honor Society).  You were trying to convey your academic achievements, and instead the error implies that you didn’t spend much time proofreading your application.  In the case of this store, trying to express the quality of merchandise without the letter “l” sends a more negative message about quality than if the sign wasn’t even on the wall.

Before clicking “submit,” take a few more minutes for the final proofread. You’ll feel better about your application, and the committee will be better able to focus on you, not careless mistakes and typos.