Posts Tagged ‘Boston’

Wednesday
February 6

What is there to do in Boston during the Winter?

By Katie Kocourek

BU students on the Frog Pond

Hello! My name is Katie and I am an Assistant Director of Marketing & Communications for BU Admissions. I’m also a BU alum who graduated from the School of Management in May 2012. In our office, I have the unique opportunity of working with the recruitment team and individuals from each of BU’s schools and colleges to develop our integrated communications for prospective students. I am lucky in that every day I get to represent the university that I love and reflect on the wonderful experiences I had as a student.

Originally from Minnesota, I am no stranger to winter. This was always one of my favorite times of year as a student. Not only does the campus look beautiful covered in snow, but the colder months bring some of the best that Boston has to offer. After all, who can resist the idea of a pick-up game of soccer in the snow on the BU Beach or cozying up with a good book and a cup of coffee at the George Sherman Union?

There are thousands of things to do in Boston during the winter, but here are a few of my favorites:

  1. Enjoy an evening skating at the Frog Pond
    Located in the heart of the Boston Common, the Frog Pond is one of the most visited sites in the city. During the winter, this iconic pool is transformed into an ice rink—so grab a bunch of friends and get ready to skate the night away. On Tuesday evenings, the Frog Pond even offers half-priced admission to students who show their college I.D.<
  2. Take in a performance at BU’s Huntington Theatre Company
    Known for its eclectic seasons of up-and-coming plays and classics, the Huntington Theatre Company is one of the premier theatres in Boston. For the past 30 years, the theatre has staged nationally-renowned productions that have enhanced the artistic culture of the city. Lucky for us, this remarkable venue offers discount tickets for students and members of the BU community and is only a Boston University Shuttle ride away.
  3. Cheer on the Terriers in the Beanpot
    This hockey tournament, played the first two Mondays and Tuesdays of February, showcases Boston collegiate rivalries at their best. Every year, the men’s and women’s hockey teams from Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern, and Harvard face off in a fierce tournament unlike any other in the country. The cheers are deafening, the fans shake the arenas, and the games are incredibly intense. Be sure to get your tickets early, because this is one event you do not want to miss as a student!
  4. Hit the nearby slopes on a day trip
    Boston has many ski and snowboard areas that are only a short trip away, making it easy to hit the slopes. The BU Ski & Board Club, a student-run group on campus, welcomes skiers and snowboarders of all abilities. Each season, they organize multiple trips to local ski and board areas for great prices. Additionally, many outdoor sporting goods stores such as Eastern Mountain Sports organize ski, snowboard, or even snowshoe day trips, allowing you to experience New England outdoors during the winter.
  5. Spend an afternoon taking in Boston’s museums
    We have some of the best museums in the world right here at our doorstep, and a chilly winter day is the perfect time to check them out. The Museum of Fine Arts features one of the most comprehensive collections of art in the world—consisting of everything from a renowned display of Egyptian artifacts to an entire wing devoted to the great artists of the Americas to the largest collection of Japanese works under one roof outside of Japan. Smaller than the Museum of Fine Arts (but equally fantastic), the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum provides a cozy, intimate environment for viewing a unique collection of more than 2,500 paintings, sculptures, furniture pieces, and decorative arts. This collection, personally compiled by Isabella Stewart Gardner herself, is housed in a beautiful 15th-century Venetian-style palace surrounding a gorgeous courtyard. Finally, a trip to the Museum of Science, located along the Charles River at the Science Park T Station, is a great way to spend an afternoon. This museum offers visitors shows at the Charles Hayden Planetarium and Mugar Omni Theater, a number of live presentations, and over 500 interactive exhibits highlighting topics ranging from the ecosystems and wildlife of New England to lightning and weather.

As you can see, winter offers lots of fun opportunities to get out and explore the city of Boston. Enjoy the remainder of the season and I hope to see you on campus soon!

 

Monday
December 19

Is it really cold in Boston?

By Lisa H.

I’m always surprised when I get this question on the road, especially because I primarily travel to the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, where the weather isn’t very different from here in Boston (and  I’m pretty sure that they’ve gotten more snow than us for the past two years). I understand it a bit more when I travel back to my hometown of Richmond, VA where even rumors of snow lead to hoarding of canned goods and a day off of school for 2 inches of snowfall.

So, to dispel any mysteries surrounding winters in Boston for those of you in warmer climates, I provide you with (in my opinion) the two most important characteristics of the coldest season of the year:

Winters here are long, rather than frigid. While we’ll likely have a few days that get particularly cold (think Minnesota, with temps regularly well below zero), winters here are much more temperate (we’re talking like 10-35 degrees) but the cold will start as early as October – like this year when we got our first snow Halloween weekend – and will go right on up until April.

Winters are unpredictable. One year we’ll get very little snow, and the next we’ll get this:

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The snow here is one of the things that make Boston the charming city that it is in the winter, and I love watching the whole city turn white — this is the view from our office window looking out onto Commonwealth Ave last year:

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But as much as I love the snow and winters here in Boston (I do love my seasons), I’m very grateful this holiday season for the days I get to enjoy the snow from the comfort of my own living room while working from home, and the week I’ll be spending in California before the worst of the winter really hits. But for when the snow does come, my best advice is to ignore all fashion and invest in a heavy winter coat and some waterproof snow boots.

Happy holidays, and stay warm!

Thursday
December 15

What movie are we going to see this weekend?

By Stacey Milton

Coolidge Corner Theatre, located just off campus in nearby Brookline

Some of my favorite memories of being a student a BU include weekend outings to the movies with friends. Living in Myles Standish Hall, we were a ten minute walk from the theatre at Fenway. I couldn’t tell you how many weekends were spent corralling a group of five or more to see the new Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter (there was a new film in either series for each year I was a BU student — it was awesome).

As a high school student, I worked in a small, five-screen movie theatre in my hometown. I loved working behind the scenes as a projectionist, but often lamented that many of the films that I wanted to check out – mostly indie or foreign films – never made it to our little town. I was like a kid in a candy store when I found that in Boston I could see every film that I wanted to check out. I think I saw Amélie three times at the theatre in Copley. Alas, this particular theatre is now a Barneys.

I have no doubt that current students are still enjoying this movie-going tradition on the weekends. In fact, I was thrilled to come across this post from BU Culture Shock, the blog of BU’s Howard Thurman Center. Their recent post, “CULTS, CLASSICS AND REAL BUTTER” is a great guide to the many independent theatres in the Boston area. Film buffs, take notice. You’ll want to check these out for sure.

Tuesday
October 18

The leaves are changing! Here’s what’s happening around Boston this season

By Stacey Milton

Lake Wannapowitt in Wakefield, MA, courtesy of our own Rachel Boyle.

Lake Wannapowitt in Wakefield, MA, courtesy of our own Rachel Boyle.

Boston University has students from all over the country, and all over the world. With that said, whether you are from Los Angeles, Chicago, or Mumbai – or even from right here on the East Coast – it’s hard not to love Boston in the fall. The leaves are changing, the air is cool and crisp, and the sweaters are coming out. We are right in the midst of my favorite season, and there is so much to take advantage of as a student in the Boston area this time of year! Many students take it upon themselves to head out and find fun ways to spend a crisp October day, but you will also find that Resident Assistants and student groups often organize some pretty awesome day trips around the Boston area.

Here are just a few of the things you could look forward to!

Check out the beautiful fall foliage at the Arnold Arboretum – you don’t even need to leave the city! Take a tour of the “marvelous maples”, or learn about autumn fruits. Even better, it’s only a short T ride from campus.

Chill out with the Berklee BeanTown Jazz Festival. This annual event is generally scheduled toward the end of September along Columbus Avenue in downtown Boston. Listen to some great tunes, eat delicious food from all over the world and even check out the “instrument petting zoo”!

Spend a day at the Harvard Square Oktoberfest. You can take a hot air balloon ride over Cambridge! Among other activities, there is a parade, lots of arts and crafts, tasty fall food, and several music stages.

Take a Halloween Haunted Beacon Hill Tour! Learn some fun history, hear some ghost stories, and spend a night walking around one of Boston’s most beautiful areas.

And…one cannot miss a trip up to historic Salem, MA for some Haunted Happenings! You’ll find haunted cruises and ghost tours by trolley and candlelight. Home of the infamous Salem Witch Trials (there’s even a museum!) this is a wonderfully spooky way to spend an October day.

Thursday
September 29

Travel Highlights: Boston, MA

By Stacey Milton

I am early in my travels throughout Boston, and last week I was thrilled to see just how much enthusiasm and excitement students have for BU! I visited Boston Latin Academy where I met about 50 excited students ready and waiting to hear me talk about all things BU.  In less than an hour we covered everything from academics to study abroad and everything in between. My favorite part of any high school visit is the time for Q & A. I feel like students walk away with a feeling of comfort knowing that the admissions process doesn’t have to be as scary as it can sometimes seem. Plus, I love sharing the many ways in which BU is a really cool place filled with amazing possibilities.

In case you’re ever at a loss for what to ask when either I, or one of my colleagues, is visiting your high school, here are a few of my favorites:

  • Why should I apply to Boston University?
  • How can BU connect me to the city of Boston?
  • When can I study abroad and where?
  • How can I decide if Early Decision is right for me?
  • What kind of workload should I expect as a freshman?
  • Do you really read my essay?

Phebe & Sarah Z. after a visit to Boston Latin Academy

Phebe & Sarah Z. after a visit to Boston Latin Academy

Stay tuned for more travel highlights!

Phebe

Monday
September 26

BU is #1

By kede

Woohooo! Unigo and HuffPost College named Boston University the #1 Best Place to Go to College!

Below is a short excerpt, you can read the full post here:

With a storied history, bustling sports culture, and more than 50 colleges in the city, Boston is one of the most exciting places in the country to be a student, and BU is right in the thick of it. “Often, friends and I would go around the city to eat in Boston’s ‘little Italy’ the North End, or catch a Red Sox game, or go to a local bar and shoot pool. The benefit, for me, of going to college within a city was there never seemed to be a shortage of anything to do,” says Rachel, a theatre major.