Monthly Archives: July 2010

US Secretary of Education’s Year 2

United States Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is currently completing his first year in office.  Dean of SED Hardin Coleman offers his thoughts on what Duncan should focus on during his second year:

Textbook rental program coming to BU

Beginning in the fall, Boston University will give students a new lease on their sometimes budget-focused, hectic lives by offering a new textbook rental program designed to deliver maximum savings and convenience. Designed by BU administrators and Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, the innovative rental program will allow students to rent their textbooks for less than […]

No more “sh***y deals” at Goldman

On the heels of Congressional hearings in which e-mails from Goldman Sachs traders told of “sh***y deals” being offered to customers, the Wall Street bank has now banned profanity in company e-mail correspondence.  School of Management master lecturer Mark Williams, a former Federal Reserve Bank examiner and author of “Uncontrolled Risk” about the fall of […]

Citigroup pays to settle subprime claims

Without admitting guilt, Citigroup will pay $75 million to settle federal civil claims that it failed to disclose vast holdings of subprime mortgage investments that crippled the bank during the financial crisis.  Law Professor Cornelius Hurley, director of the Morin Center for Banking and Financial Law and a former counsel to the Federal Reserve Board […]

Arizona’s immigration battle

Protesters stormed the streets of Phoenix objecting to Arizona’s new immigration law, most of which was struck down by a federal court judge who ruled that the bulk of the law intruded on federal responsibilities for immigration control.  Law Professor Susan Akram, an authority on immigration law, says the only way to keep states and […]

Lobbying the financial reform act

Intense lobbying is under way over the Dodd-Frank financial regulatory reform act, with federal agencies needing to fill in the details of at least 243 financial rules and conduct 67 studies before implementing the most sweeping such law since the 1930s.  Political science Professor Graham Wilson, author of “Business and Politics,” says citizens should be […]

WikiLeaks and classified information

The massive unauthorized leak by WikiLeaks to three newspapers, including The New York Times, of 91,000 classified documents related to the war in Afghanistan may cause a reassessment of the war effort by the Obama administration.  It already has shown how times have changed in the Internet age since the leak of the Pentagon Papers by government insider […]

EU antitrust probe of IBM

Euopean Union regulators launched two antitrust investigations against IBM, the world’s biggest provider of computer services, for allegedly abusing its dominant position on the mainframe computer market.  IBM says it’s cooperating with the EU probe and that it suspects the complaint is being driven by its largest competitors, led by Microsoft.  Law Professor Keith Hylton, an […]

Hearing on AZ immigration law

A federal judge in Phoenix is hearing arguments from the state, the feds, and civil rights groups over whether Arizona’s controversial new immigration law — requiring officers to check a person’s immigration status if there’s a “reasonable suspicion” that the person is here illegally — should take effect next week.  Law Professor Susan Akram, an […]

Madoff trustee sues “feeders”

The trustee overseeing the liquidation of the estate of convicted swindler Bernie Madoff (r.) has sued 25 feeder funds and 19 individuals for wrongly enriching themselves from the multi-billion-dollar Ponzi scheme for which Madoff is serving a 150-year sentence in federal prison.  Law Professor Tamar Frankel, a securities law authority and author of “Trust and Honesty: […]