Megan: Life Lessons from BU

After 7 semesters and 3 summers, my time at Boston University is drawing to a close. I will carry the memories and lessons I’ve learned long after I graduate in January, but it feels very bittersweet for my time as a student to be ending after such a wonderful experience! I’ve decided to go through and reflect on what I learned during the time I was a BU student.

Fall 2015
I was so nervous before I moved in about making friends and getting to know a city I had only visited for short periods of time. But, I was able to form a community by doing FYSOP my first week of college, befriending all of the people on my floor in Warren Towers (5C!), and joining lots and lots of clubs. It seemed silly to be afraid after meeting so many people I could relate to.

photo1

Spring 2016
This was the semester that I found my home at BU: COM Undergraduate Affairs. I really looked forward to being, and to stopping by whenever I was in COM. It was where I really found people with similar interests and passions. I also learned how much fun PDP’s are while I took a golf and swim class!

photo2

Summer 2016
I spent my first summer after college back home in Maryland, and it was the second-best summer of my entire life! It was so important for me after a school year of change to be able to come home and be with the friends I had grown up with, to nanny for the kids I love, and to sleep in my own room.

photo3

Fall 2016
This was undoubtedly the best semester of my college career. I became best friends with the greatest friend I’ve ever had, CA Claire, and realized what it meant to find a near-perfect friendship. I also worked harder than I ever had on Bay State, the BUTV10 show, and felt more confident than I ever had in my classes and what I was doing.

photo4

Spring 2017
I went from my best semester in college to my worst. Though I was doing lots of fun things, like being an assistant stage manager for BU On Broadway’s Legally Blonde, and directing on Bay State, I was doing totally too much and my mental health suffered. But, I learned how to prioritize the activities and friendships that matter, and to stick close with the friends that would be there for me through the tough times.

Summer 2017
Staying in Boston for the summer was an outstanding experience. The weather was great, I was working for Orientation, and I did my first internship. Claire and I did our fair share of cooking, and visited as many beaches as we could. We also took time to visit family in NYC and Maryland, which was super important after not being home for so long.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fall 2017
This was the semester that I had an hour long lunch break at my internship in the heart of Boston, meaning I was constantly exploring and visiting my favorite place, the Boston Harbor. I also got to read feature film scripts for the first time, and made some really wonderful new friends as I took on bigger leadership roles.

Processed with VSCO with hb1 preset

Spring 2018
My last semester in Boston was amazing because I interned at WGBH in their Children’s Programming department, and finally felt like I had found where in the entertainment industry I belonged. It was the best feeling in the world getting to go there, while also experiencing my favorite things in Boston for the last time. I miss Regina’s Pizzeria in the North End every day.

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Summer 2018
The BEST summer of my life! I got to go abroad to London and explore England, Ireland, France, Belgium, and Amsterdam, and learned what it meant to really fall in love with a city. I had never felt so clearly that I belonged somewhere, and I miss it every single day. I also got to teach a bunch of Europeans how to make s’mores, and changed their lives forever!

photo8

Fall 2018
My final semester of college has been devoted to “studying abroad” in Los Angeles, and preparing for a post-college world. I have had the opportunity to intern at what I think is probably the best place in the world, DreamWorks, and feel ready to enter the workforce and begin to make the magic I always dreamed I would.

photo9

There are so many opportunities I haven’t gotten to mention in my final blog post, but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention how much being a COM Ambassador has meant to me. I have been able to make wonderful friends, meet amazing prospective students and their families, and share my love of BU to thousands of people. That’s craziness, and I am so so thankful for COM. I’ll miss college very much, but I know it has helped me get right where I need to be.

Maddy: Why You Don’t Have To “Do Everything”

Coming into COM, it is tempting to compare yourself to COM’s ‘poster-children’ (many of whom are COM Ambassadors, surprise surprise) who are involved in absolutely everything this school has to offer. Some students seem to climb the ranks of programs you didn’t even know existed, networking and traveling and getting internships left and right, and it’s easy to feel like you’re making all the wrong decisions.

While their efforts are completely commendable, at the end of the day, it comes down to passion. And whether you’re passionate about a million things or just one, the important thing is that you care deeply.

When you’re in a job interview, you can ramble on and on about all the clubs you’re in charge of and the internships you’ve had, but at some point they’re going to ask you what you’re proud of. If you’re interviewing for an ad agency and you spend twenty minutes passionately describing your love of marine biology, that’s what will make an impression. At the end of the day, you’re not a list of accolades: you’re a person. There’s a reason they hire people and not resumes!!!!

The best piece of (unsolicited) advice my dad ever gave me is that college doesn’t just have to be a stepping stone on the way to to a job: if you let it, it can be a place where for four years you can completely immerse yourself in learning/doing whatever will make you feel fulfilled as a human being. And chances are, if you’re in COM, you love what you do.

When I first came to COM, I had to make a ton of hard choices: do I sacrifice extracurricular theatre for an internship first semester? Do I minor in something practical or pursue a subject that endlessly fascinates me? Do I drop a club that looks great on a resume just because it’s no longer making me happy?

Unfortunately, we’ll all be making those choices for the rest of our lives. But when it comes down to it, if you choose to do what you love, and you really love what you do, you cannot fail. Ya gotta do it for the sake of doing it, ya dig? The weird part about success is that there’s no one definition: personal success is whatever you want it to be. So do whatever you need to do, or NOT do, because it’ll always be enough! Thank you for coming to my TED talk.

 

Laurel: How to Be Fashionable and Sustainable

Given the recent midterm elections, it got me thinking a lot about policies, especially environmental policies. To me, some of the most important votes are the ones about our environment and how we choose to treat it. Thinking too much about its current state of the environment could get you depressed quite easily but what always uplifts me is the amount I can do as an individual to change that.

Now, we all know by now to use a reusable water bottle, take reusable grocery bags to the story and so on. There are tons of tips and tricks to make your life more sustainable: use a soap bar of shampoo to not use a plastic bottle, ditch those plastic straws. But did you ever think about the clothing you wear daily is both capable of harming the environment and helping it depending on how you shop?

Picture 1

Clothing is being vastly overproduced around the world with many of the unsold items being wasted. This creates a chain of problems for the environment especially considering how harmful some clothing material can be to the earth when not disposed of properly. That is why I have made the conscious effort to shop more sustainably and have created a short list of the brands you can shop to do the same.

 One of the easiest ways to keep on trend while remaining sustainable is by shopping at stores that make their clothing out of recycled materials. One notable company is Everlane, who now makes winter coats out of water bottles. Of, you can opt to shop local with a brand that uses old fabrics, deconstruct them and turn them into something new like Elliot Clothing who uses recycled materials such as repurposed raw silk.

Picture 2

Picture 3

Then, there are other brands that don’t produce the item you want until you buy it. What that means is that they are not overproducing so their materials will not go to waste if no one buys a certain style. Though this slows down the buying process, it forces us to think about how much we buy compared to how much is produced. A great brand that keeps demand and supply curve steady is Only Child based out of Oakland, CA.

Picture 4

Some of the biggest negative environmental issues that arise from clothing brands are poor factories that pollute the air and create unsafe human working conditions. Everlane has been transparent about their factories and working conditions making a movement to be completely plastic free in packaging while creating safe environments for humans to work.

 Other notable brands that focus on environmental sustainability are Reformation, J. Crew and Madewell. Both J. Crew and Madewell have made strides toward sustainable clothing by repurposing old jeans to insulate houses and creating eco-friendly jeans. One of the easiest forms is simply shopping at local thrift stores and repurposing clothing so it does not add waste to the world.

Picture 5
I encourage you to take more care in where you shop. Anything from workout leggings to swimsuits are being made out of plastic that is repurposed. There are so many more brands trying to create a world of fashion sustainably.  

Avery: Quick Jobs: The Hidden Gem of BU’s Campus

If you’re a student, there’s a good chance that you want to make some extra money for your own personal funds. As college undergrads, we could always use some cash to fuel our eating out and Starbucks habits. The phrase “broke college student” may be a stereotype, but I’ve found it to be true more often than not. Whether you have an off-campus job, or maybe a work study opportunity here at BU, there’s a good chance you’ll still want a quick and easy way to bring in some extra cash, especially with the holiday season (and the ensuing gift-giving frenzy) coming upon us. Or maybe you’re too busy for a full-time job, and you’re dying to find a simple way to bring in a little extra money here and there. Well, fret no more. I am here to inform you of one of BU’s most well-kept secrets: the Quick Job Listings Page.

**DISCLAIMER: This is NOT sponsored by Quick Jobs. To be honest, I’m just a really big fan of this resource and I’ve had great experiences with it, so I thought I would share it with everyone. I swear they’re not paying me to write this, but I will say that if they wanted me to be an ambassador for them I’d be down.**

What is Quick Jobs?
This portal on the Student Link is a list of one-time jobs and opportunities, both paid and unpaid, that are available to students. Many of them are on-campus and pay pretty well (at least $15 an hour). I’ve personally participated in a couple of focus groups and studies, which were actually pretty fun and easy! A lot of the studies are done by undergrad or grad students in the lab at Sargent, which is on-campus and easily accessible. And if studies aren’t your jam, there are other opportunities listed! I have friends who have found babysitting, videography, and research assistant positions on the portal.

How to Access Quick Job Listings:
First, you have to log into Student Link. On the homepage, you’ll see a teal colored tab labelled “Work.” Click on this link.

PHOTO1

Once on the “Work” menu, click on the link that says “Quick Jobs.” This will bring you to a menu with a bunch of options for categories. For jobs that are easily accessible, I would recommend using the category “On-Campus.”

PHOTO2Once you have selected this category, you’ll be brought to a page with a list of available studies and opportunities you can participate in. A lot of them pay pretty well and are easy to get to because they’re on campus!

PHOTO3I’ve done a couple of studies and only have good things to say about them. For a speech comprehension study, I went into the lab at Sargent for an hour a day for 5 days and read sentences off a screen for $20 an hour. Not bad!

How to Sign Up:
If you’re interested, they’re pretty easy to sign up for. Just click the title of the job you’re interested in and click on the job number for contact info. A lot of the people conducting studies are undergrad students who are super approachable, so don’t get intimidated by the idea of contacting them.

PHOTO4

Overall, I would highly recommend trying this out! It’s an easy and fun way to make some extra money on campus, and everyone that I know who has tried it out has had positive experiences 🙂 Now go get your study on!

Maddie: 5 Tips For Scoring Your Perfect Communications Internship

Even though it’s only November, the question of summer internships is starting to linger in the air. As deadlines approach and the anxiety thickens, our plans for next summer seem to even more important. What used to be summers working at summer camps are now summers spent working a 9 to 5—but honestly, if you’re doing something you love, it feels like you were meant to be at this internship.

There’s nothing better than scoring your dream internship, but you have to put the work in in order to do so. Whether you’re seeking your first internship ever or trying to solidify one last internship before you walk across the graduation stage (eeek!), these tips below will help you get your head on straight before you dive into the never-ending internship applications.

1. Be organized and diligent.

If you’re anything like me, lists are your first line of defense in getting your thoughts together. When preparing for internships, it’s incredibly important to have either a document or spreadsheet of all the places you would be potentially interested in applying, what the opening is, where the internship is, and when the application deadline is. If you’re detail-oriented, you can even research housing accommodations and funding provided. Going the extra mile in researching the positions that are best suited for you and then compiling them all into one file will make your life during this stressful season 100% easier.

2. Explore your options.

While you may have a specific idea of what you want out of a summer internship, it doesn’t hurt to explore other avenues to reach that end goal. A popular option for COM students seeking internships is enrolling in any of the COM-specific study abroad programs. These programs include guaranteed internships in LondonDublinSydneyLos AngelesWashington D.C., and New York City. I participated in a Public Relations internship through the London program, and I genuinely learned so much about working in a business setting and maintaining media relations. These internships, in particular, are great options for students who aren’t entirely sure what they specifically want, but are looking to advance their career and have an unforgettable summer. 

3. Be flexible.

If you’re in COM, you’ve definitely had classes and outside exposure to other fields of communication. No matter what major you are, allow yourself to have an open mind when searching for a summer internship and don’t get boxed in by your major. I’m not saying that print journalism students need to go get an internship in film and television—that would be counterproductive. But if you’re majoring in mass communications, advertising, or public relations, dip your toe into other fields when searching for an internship. Marketing, advertising, and PR all require similar skills and can be applied to a variety of workplaces. Additionally, COM students are gifted with the ability to write and write well—use that to your advantage and make it work for any internship you have an interest in.  

4. Ask for help.

If you’re really struggling to find an internship you like for the summer, or just don’t even know where to begin, BU has an endless amount of resources for you to use in your search. There is the university-wide Center for Career Development that will go over your resume for you and point you in a general direction on your career path. However, if you’re looking for more specialized attention, COM Career Services also provides resume workshops, LinkedIn sessions, and is more attuned to the opportunities specifically provided to COM students. If you’re feeling lost, you can turn to these two resources and any advisor—COM is here to help. 

5. Don’t fret.

Listen, the internship hunt can take a toll on anyone. Above all, remain confident in yourself. Learn how to sell yourself to potential employers and know that you have the skills to take on the challenge. No matter if you’re looking for your first or fourth internship, take time to breathe in between applications. Also, if you end up getting the last resort as your internship or no internship at all, that does not mean you are lesser. If you don’t have internship plans for the upcoming summer, there are other ways to spend your time! Take summer classes, get a job, save up and travel—you don’t need to have everything figured out.

 I hope these tips will motivate you to start looking for your next great step in your career! Happy job searching!

Sophia: The Best Houseplants for BU Dorms

Unless you’ve got a service animal, BU dorms aren’t particularly pet friendly. While the idea of sneaking your dog to school might seem fun in practice in reality there aren’t a lot of options for the lonely college student. When the animal kingdom is out of reach however, look no further than the world of plants! The right houseplant can freshen the air in your room, give you something to care for, and of course, looks great! Whether you go full Poison Ivy, or are just looking for something small to start your new indoor garden, here are some of the best plants for BU dorms. 

1. Succulents and cacti

picture 1

Coming in an astounding variety of shapes, sizes, and colors, succulents are a great first plant. They’re nearly impossible to kill. Succulents require little water, with most varieties only needing to be lightly watered once a week, and even with low light will be able to hang on through the Boston winter. Since you can find many very small succulents for very cheap it can be fun to get a few to fill a cute pot, or line up along the windowsill. Just beware if you go for one of the spikier varieties of cacti!

2. Pothos Ivy

picture 2

If you want more of a classic leafy green, pothos is a great hardy option. Pothos doesn’t require a lot of light, and so can survive in even the dimmest Warren dorm room. As for water, pothos should be watered whenever the soil in it’s pot fully dries out, in my experience every three days or so. As an ivy, pothos plants can have very cool tendrils grow out from them, so place it on a high shelf to really get that jungle vibe!

3. Snake plants

picture 3

If you’re going for height in your home garden, look no further than the Snake plant! Snake plants grow up rather than out, with long green leaves. With a reputation for being hardy, Snake plants can survive in low light all throughout the coldest Boston winter. Much like pothos, Snake plants should only be watered after their soil has fully dried out, about every three to four days depending on the size of your plant. While you can get smaller started Snakes, I recommend going with a slightly taller, more mature plant, if you have the room. 

4. Spider plants

picture 3

Picture this, you have a plant, wow, amazing! Your plant makes you the coolest on your floor, but wait! Now all your friends want plants too! Enter the Spider plant. Spider plants often start sprouting smaller spider plants you can clip and give to your friends and roommates, meaning you can share the flora love! Spider plants like bright, but indirect light, and need to be watered about every three days.

5. Air plants

picture 5

Nobody, and I do mean nobody, can kill an Air plant. These guys don’t need soil, and only need to be misted with water one every week or so. You can put Air plant in, on, or around anything. Geodes, frames, pots, your COM 101 textbook, anything. Much like succulents, if you’re going with an Air plant you might as well go with more than one, because they can be found for very cheap and look great in a group.
While these are just some of the easiest and hardiest houseplants, there’s a whole world of flora out there! Stores like economy hardware in Brookline, and Home Depot if you can go farther out of town, often have a ton of reasonably prices plants in a variety of sizes. If you’re looking for something already in a cute pot and don’t mind having fewer options, try Back Bay Florist on Mass Ave or Central Square Florist in Cambridge. Of course the internet can also be used for goods and services, and Amazon, Etsy, and Bloomscape all have great plants available as well. From my (obsessive amount of) plants to you, happy sprouting!

 

Kaya: It’s O.K. to ‘TK’

There’s a common abbreviation in journalism — “TK” — that often peppers first drafts and second ones, sometimes buried in the article until the very last and final deadline approaches.

The unusual letter combination (“TK” doesn’t appear in many words, so it’s easier to spot amid a lot of text) represents information “to come”: everything from names and ages to quotes and entire paragraphs or chunks that remain unknown or just need a bit of tinkering.

I’m a big fan of using “TK” when I’m writing, even (and especially) when I’m spitballing ideas — some of my notes look like I fell asleep on the keyboard: “‘TK quote,’ TK said. TKTKTK.”

Some of my best stories have risen from a sea of T’s and K’s, including this one. I was typing out the headline, still not quite sure what I was about to write, when I recognized that the TK was more than a placeholder: it was an idea.

I’ve realized that there are always more questions I could ask a source, always more information I could research, always more color I can add to make my stories more interesting and engaging. By leaving things open-ended, by creating a space to add something new, even by reminding myself that I really do need to ask someone how old they are, I open up the page to bigger ideas and possibilities.

I’ve also realized that leaving space in my life for the things to come can open up my own future to bigger ideas and possibilities in a way I didn’t always think was the smartest, most pragmatic move I could make.

For a long time, I thought if I left space in my life — if I filled my planner with TKs instead of meticulously handwritten meetings and appointments — I would end up feeling empty. I often worried (and still sometimes do) that if I didn’t plan everything out for the next days, weeks, months, and years, those TKs and those spaces I left would turn into nothingness and regrets — for the opportunities I didn’t seize, the hours I wasted, the time and energy that could have been spent doing something other than daydream, relax, rest in preparation for things to come.

But leaving out the TKs just left me with information I didn’t need, my energy overspent in pursuit of what I saw as a very linear path. Packing my schedule in high school, and in my first year and a half in college, seemed like the only way to achieve my goals as a journalist and as a person.

And in some ways, those extracurriculars and activities did help me reach new heights. But the moment I dropped the meetings and classes that overwhelmed me, and the moment I made space for the TKs and all the good things yet to come, I didn’t feel empty, or regretful, or unfulfilled.

Instead I felt fuller, happier, more fulfilled — as if my potential increased when I scrapped the jumbo planner and opted for smaller pages and more stickers. The thing I feared — that I wasn’t doing enough, even though I was doing a lot — actually dissipated when I started approaching things in anticipation of life’s great TKs. I spent more time with friends, I cooked more, I had the chance to have relax and have fun without worrying that I was wasting time.

Sure, some of the things I wanted to accomplish were no longer carefully plotted, the boxes waiting to be ticked off. Suddenly, there were bigger gaps in my future — ones that I haven’t yet filled in. Those big unknowns are scary for everyone, and especially for me, as someone who worries a lot about filling in the gaps.

But a TK doesn’t end up in the final version of an article. Information goes there — information the reporter finds in the process of research and discovery. The same applies to life: the things we don’t know yet are still to come, but eventually, we get to figure them out.

Every once in a while, when you’re feeling overwhelmed, or off course, on a tangent or a break from some carefully-designed plan, remind yourself that it’s O.K. to TK. Because the best is yet to come — even when we don’t know what that is right now.

Sydney: How to Live in the Moment When Time is Flying By

It’s the beginning of November, and I can’t believe this semester is almost over. It’s so easy to get wrapped up in school work, jobs, and other responsibilities that the semester passes by in a blink of an eye. I try to live in the moment, but I’m sure many can agree that it’s not that easy. This is my last semester in Boston because I will be spending my final semester in LA through the COM Internship Program. I have come up with a few ways to help me live in the moment and enjoy my last few weeks in Beantown before heading out for good!

Set time for yourself.
It’s so easy to get caught up in the moment, but it is so important to set some time apart for yourself. With stress from classes, internships, and other extra-curriculars, prioritizing “me time” helps you take a step back, relax, and appreciate everything you have accomplished so far. I try to do this by working out, going on a walk, watching a movie, or meditating. This helps me live in the moment and enjoy a break from everything else in my life.

 Don’t plan too much.
I feel like I’m constantly planning throughout the semester, between setting time for club meetings, work schedules, and other activities, it’s difficult to live in the moment because I am always thinking about what’s ahead. But, a goal for this month is to not plan too much during my free time and to act spontaneously. Instead of constantly thinking about what’s next, I will try to live in the moment and enjoy what is going on in the now.

Make time for friends.
Although there may be a lot going on between school and work, making time for friends is essential. Especially since I only have a few weeks left with my friends in Boston, I am trying to enjoy my time with them as much as possible. After a busy week of classes, homework, and work, I find hanging out with my friends is a great way to take a break and relax. With time flying by, spending time with them helps me live in the moment and enjoy the now.

 With this semester going so fast, I hope these tips help you learn to live in the moment and enjoy every second at BU!

Lilah: Finding Your Home

When I first came to Boston University, I thought I was a tough girl, a tough cookie, a tough macaron. I had finished high school which meant I was the top of the top. I didn’t need anyone or anything. I was headed straight to fame, baby.

I tried to make it through my first year without returning home. After all, I was a very cool freshman. I made it pretty far. Well, LISTEN UP! Throughout my first two years here, I have learned that the most important thing is to be honest with yourself. If you cannot make it through the entire year without some kind of getaway, it’s okay. Make sure you have a happy place that you can go to if times get stressful. For me, I knew that my happy place was on my pond at home around the evening, even if I didn’t want to admit it. Good ol’ Mother Nature is rare around here, and home is always there to welcome me.

Whether your home is far or close, it is important that you take time for yourself. It is easy to be caught in the fast-paced schoolwork, clubs, and work that flies your way every week. Especially as the holidays roll through, or school gets tough, your home can be an escape. If Boston is your true home, But, maybe you have a fluffy little puppy (like me) that you can snuggle with. Other than the rats and bunnies, there aren’t many furry creatures to pet around campus.

Call your parents! Your family is probably aching without their sweet little darling. They would love an update, and it’s important to get advice from the people who know you best. Getting out of the bubble takes effort, but when you do, you can clear your mind.

The point is, I am not a tough macaron all the time. I go home sometimes so that I can enjoy Boston in the way it deserves. After all, it is an amazing city. For me, if I have to find some nature on the spot, I’ll go to the Arboretum, or the Charles River. Remember to find what you like in the city, and get outside the bubble once in a while. Now, I’m a tough cookie… who also likes to hug her mom once in a while.

Frank: Satire @ BU

I’m a journalism student and as such I’ve written my fair share of articles. From op-eds to features, to listicles to reviews, I’ve written all different kinds of pieces. This semester, though, I started writing something a bit funnier– I started satire.

During the summer, I applied to join The Bunion, Boston University’s satire news publication. Now satire has always been a thing that interested me, I’ve been a fan of The Onion for a long time and about a year ago I found out about The Hard Times and Hard Drive, who make fun of punk music and video game scenes respectively. I was bit by the satire bug last year and when I saw The Bunion was looking for staff writers, I submitted my application almost immediately. I say almost immediately because there was a very important part of the application I was having a hard time with: the article submission.

I had to write an article to finish my application. Luckily, I zeroed in on what I was gonna write about pretty quickly. At the beginning of the summer, I got a notification on Facebook about a post somebody made on the Official Boston University Class of 2020 group. I hadn’t checked the Class of 2020 Facebook group since my Freshman year, so I clicked on the notification and browsed the group to see what my fellow rising juniors were up to. As I found out, the group had become a wasteland. Nobody had posted anything on the group in a long time, I guess like me a lot of people had forgotten about it. Essentially the Facebook group was now a ghost town, people were still in the group but nobody posted anything. I thought this might be something funny to write about so I took it and ran with it.

Choosing a topic to write about was easy, the hard part was actually writing it. At first I wrote the article with the idea of the Facebook group being a literal ghost town, a remnant from the Wild Wild West, and there was a sheriff of sorts that would protect the group from any new posts. I worked on it for a couple of days until I finally gave up on making it work. The whole cowboy-sheriff thing proved to be too complicated, since I realized I knew absolutely nothing about cowboys. I scrapped the whole thing. I settled on just writing down my raw thoughts and put a sort of journalistic spin on it. That was easier, but it really wasn’t funny. It kinda just read as a rant that didn’t really go anywhere, but I guess the editors liked it enough to have me join the team.

I got a chance to rework the article a couple weeks ago. After going to writer meetings, talking to fellow Bunion Staff Writers, and getting to write pieces of satire on other topics, I finally got what it took to make my first article work. The first thing I did was pretty much erase most of it. A lot of what I wrote down just didn’t work, or only I found funny. I then made my target more specific and I gave it actual jokes. I basically reworked the whole thing.

It felt nice working on my first article again; it was almost as if I had come full circle. In the short time I’ve been with The Bunion, I’ve really learned a lot. If you’re interested in reading my articles and other articles made by even funnier people, check them out over at thebunionpaper.com

P.S. Here’s a link to my reworked first article: https://thebunionpaper.com/student-makes-post-on-bu-facebook-group-as-if-anybody-is-gonna-look-at-it