Tag Archives: Boston

Boston bucket list for grad students

By Ali Parisi
MS Public Relations ’16
BU College of Communication

It’s no secret that grad school is a pricey venture.  But here’s the thing about going to grad school in Boston: you’re in Boston.  And this sports-crazed, historical goldmine is full of numerous adventures that aren’t as expensive as you may think.

If you’re fortunate enough to have a car (or rather, unfortunate enough to have to worry about parking in the city), apple picking is a must-try.  I have to admit, apple picking was foreign to me when I was back home on the West Coast.  But after venturing out to Parlee Farms in Tyngsboro, Mass. (50 minute drive), I felt fully prepared for New England fall.  Pumpkins, flowers and over 20 kinds of apples are just some of the treats you can grab at Parlee, not to mention homemade pumpkin butter and fresh apple cider donuts that are to die for.  Oh, and did I mention there’s no entrance fee? Just don’t forget cash to buy yourself some delicious treats.

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However, if you don’t feel like sticking around and exploring the city we live before venturing out into the suburbs, hop on a Hubway bike and see Boston on your own terms. Unlike pricey guided tours, Hubway allows you to rent a bicycle from over 100 stations sprinkled throughout the city.  Any ride under 30 minutes is free, and a 24-hour pass is only $6.  Worried about Boston’s infamously scary drivers?  Stick to the Charles River Reservation Bike loop to avoid the honking and see the river.  And be sure to take advantage of the Hubway bikes soon, before Mother Nature gives Boston the cold shoulder.

Maybe you need a break from studying, and biking just isn’t your thing.  No worries. Just head to Samuel Adams Brewery in Jamaica Plain (from BU: 20 minutes by car or 50 by train) to taste their OctoberFest.  The brewery holds free tours year-round.  For another beer option, check out the Harpoon Brewery (from BU: 15 minutes by car or 55 by train) where you can get a $5 beer tasting.

Aside from all these wonderful options, there is one place you simply must visit while living in Boston: the one and only Fenway Park.  Even if you aren’t able to catch a game, tours are offered daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Student tickets are just $12, and since Fenway is practically on BU’s campus (at just a 5 minute walk from the bookstore), there is really no excuse not to.

Need more ideas? Check out this article for more inexpensive ways to explore Boston: http://www.boston.com/travel/things-around-boston-for-under/k7CCC0L1GXcfsnPvVDvMiM/gallery.html

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A lot going on at this year’s Sustainability Festival at BU

By Michelle Marino
MS Journalism ’16
BU College of Communication

“I’m just a fancy trash man”, says Adam Mitchell of Save That Stuff, a sustainable waste and recycling service based in Charlestown, Massachusetts. Taken at face value, this might seem an eccentric statement, but at BU’s Sustainability Festival, Mitchell was in good company.

Adam Mitchell, Major Account Representative & Partner of Save That Stuff, delves into the composting process at last Thursday's BU Sustainability Festival.

Adam Mitchell, Major Account Representative & Partner of Save That Stuff, delves into the composting process at last Thursday’s BU Sustainability Festival.

The event, which took place last Thursday, was presented by Sustainability@BU in conjunction with BU’s Bike Safety and Dining Services organizations.  Located at Marsh Plaza, the area was filled with tables, tented booths, students and staff. A generally placid walk past Marsh Chapel was thoroughly reinvented into a vibrant and lively festival, zeroed in on promoting university sustainability. Even our boys in blue, the Boston Police Department, were compelled to make an appearance.

There was something for everyone at the Festival, from bike tune-up’s to local meal kits, oyster shell recycling to fresh farm berries. But let’s just pretend for a minute you needed a bit more of an incentive to attend such an event. Not a problem – the promise of chicken fingers at the Raisin’ Cane’s booth, the thrill of the spin at the bike-inspired prize wheel, or seeing a fleet of Boston PD officers with bikes in tow had you covered. I’m also a sucker for a free water bottle, which were handed out in abundance from Sustainability@BU.

Surprisingly, the largest line of all seemed to be concentrated at the LED challenge station in the middle of the event. In exchange for an incandescent or compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) bulb, you received a free LED bulb in replacement. This is part of a series of ongoing “Join the Challenge” initiatives put on by Sustainability@BU in partnership with an organization called Carbonrally. Each month a different sustainability challenge is highlighted, and Carbonrally provides the platform to keep track of your challenges and progress.

Bike and pedestrian safety was a major component of the event, as was the farmers market and representation of 18 clubs comprising the BU Environmental Coalition. Members of groups such as BU Beekeeping, BU Energy Club and the BU Vegetarian Society were all present. In a discussion with a member of the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center, I learned about BU’s balanced “Sargent Choice” meals, the option to take a one-credit nutrition class, as well as cooking classes and one hour of free counseling available at the Center.

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I also spoke with MassBike, a coalition advocating “Better Bicycling for Massachusetts,” partnering with numerous stakeholders to educate schools and other groups about biking safety. My favorite part of the event came in at the food (shocker). The farmers market boasted an abundance of different offerings and produce, the most impressive of which I found to be Ward’s Berry Farm out of Sharon. Apples, carrots, squash, cauliflower, raspberries and cherry tomatoes all on display in the middle of an urban campus reminded me we’re not all that far from locally sourced food.

The event had a solid turnout, and I learned a few things about sustainability as well as the countless related organizations BU offers. I’m pleased the farmers market will continue to run throughout September and October as well, on Thursdays at the GSU Plaza from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. To find out more about Sustainability@BU, follow them on Facebook at: BUsustainability, or on Twitter: @sustainableBU.

BU COM celebrates its 100th Anniversary with COM Talks

By Gina Kim
MS Journalism ’16
BU College of Communication

It’s been a great past week for Boston University’s College of Communication (COM). With the celebration of the program’s 100th anniversary, COM hosted a number events that honored its alumni, students, staff and faculty. This weekend, I had the opportunity to attend COM Talks, an event not too different from the ever so influential TED Talks, which have been making such a huge difference in people’s lives. These talks reach millions nationwide, informing them of ideas worth sharing, ranging from “Why a good book is a secret door,” to the controversies of gender violence. At BU, we’ve developed our own, unique style of a Talk event but with the same idea in mind: connecting and communicating the ideas worth sharing.

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At the event, COM featured a superstar panel of experts in their respective fields of mass communication and journalism. Each speaker shared their personal experiences, what their roles in this industry mean to them and how every story we report leaves a mark everywhere and affects the way society functions. Each speaker reminded us of what roles we take on as both the reader and the reporter.  As each speaker shared his/her message, one message remained consistent: Storytelling is the heart of what COM does and it gives every individual an opportunity to connect with audiences. This event brought the best alumni and faculty to demonstrate the craft of true storytelling.

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This is a candid photo that my friend and fellow blogger Keiko Talley took while I was waiting in line to meet the Senior Vice President of HBO, Jay Roewe, a BU alumnus and producer of many major hit shows such as “The Newsroom” and the show that’s taken the entire world by force, “Game of Thrones”. Needless to say, I was absolutely stoked. Not to mention, absolutely star struck. I don’t usually get too fangirly but, GAME OF THRONES?! Come ON!

He was just one of the few amazing people we got to meet and listen at COM Talks. It was definitely a panel of rock stars in the industry; from New York Times best-selling authors, to legal prosecutors, to those who worked for Good Morning America and my very own Media Law professor Dick Lehr, whose investigative reporting on the case of Whitey Bulger for the Boston Globe got turned into a Hollywood movie starring Johnny Depp, Sienna Miller, and Benedict Cumberbatch. This group of superb individuals that came to speak at the event were so impressive, and they all reiterated the same message reminding us why we chose journalism, and what we can do to utilize it as an important facet of society.

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At the end of the event, we were given a small card that forced us to go up to any of these speakers and ask them the questions printed on the card. I had to go up to an alumni and ask what their favorite course was at COM. That part was easy…I was already given something to ask. However, being forced to jump out of my comfort zone and overcome my shyness to reach out to these amazing people was another story. I felt like I wasn’t worthy of being in their presence, but I mustered up all the courage possible and did it. In turn, I had the privilege of meeting with our first COM Talk speaker Travis Roy (COM ’00), author of “Eleven Seconds” and former hockey player for the BU Terriers.

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Besides speaking with Mr. Jay Roewe, meeting with Travis Roy was definitely a personal highlight of the event.  His speech stood out to me for so many reasons. He came to BU in the fall of 1995 with a hockey scholarship, but a few weeks later on October 20th,  his life changed forever. Roy suffered an injury that left him a quadriplegic. On Saturday, Roy said it was at that challenging time in his life when he realized that as often as we may choose our challenges, other times, the challenges choose us. It isn’t about how much gets taken away from us, but rather, how we choose to respond and find what drives us forward, despite our obstacles. The core of Roy’s personal story was definitely emotional; as much as he kept pointing out the simplicity of his message, it was definitely the most profound.

IMG_2475What COM Talks helped me realize that every day we are here, we get more and more inspired and motivated. Whether we find the inspiration in our classes, the lectures or even the events that are put together for students, they all push us forward. Not only are there a lot of impressive individuals at COM worth getting to know, but there is also such a large pool of successful alumni always willing to help current students out. The event reminded me why I’m here, and the endless opportunities that await all of us even long after we leave.

Most of the speakers are all alumni who, at one point in their lives, were in our very shoes, trying to get the word out and deciding on their career paths. They were students just like us, hoping to make a mark on the industry someday. At the end of the day, as COM Talks reminded us, it’s about serving the public’s needs, discussing the truth, and making a difference.

 

COM Talks comes to BU

By Keiko Talley
MS Journalism ’16
BU College of Communication

When preparing for the real world, the one phrase that has been etched into my mind is “it’s all about who you know”. It’s a saying that gets old after hearing it for a while, yet it seems to be true in so many ways. One thing that I have learned is that networking is the key to a successful career. One of the perks of going to Boston University is the members or alumni of the school that can help you get a job when you’re ready. The professors are always willing to help and the alumni don’t stay away for too long, as they are always giving back to the place that gave their careers life.

This, as a graduate student starting to look for jobs, gives me hope for my future. I’ve only been here for a few weeks, but it is clear that BU prides itself on creating unique and enjoyable opportunities for students to meet new people and network with alumni and professors, in order to help jump start their career. One of those many opportunities is taking place this weekend at BU’s COM100 Celebrations and Alumni event.

Over the past couple of years, inspirational speeches such as TED Talks, have become a new phenomenon designed to disseminate powerful messages and ideas to the public. The topics of these talks vary anywhere from how to manage your stress to being a model. Interesting people with diverse backgrounds have participated, including Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, Malcolm Gladwell and Jane Goodall.

Of course BU’s College of Communication (COM) couldn’t ignore this educational trend, so they have brought the idea to COM, with COM Talks. This Saturday, September 20th, COM alums as well as current professors will prepare 6-10 minute talks on a topic relevant to their field. Speakers include Co-Host of NPR’s Here & Now, Jeremy Hobson, Co-Host of The MOMS on SiriusXM, Denise Albert, 2014 Lawyer of the Year thanks to her dedication and advocacy to fight human trafficking, Cynthia Cordes, Senior VP of HBO, Jay Roewe, motivational speaker and former BU hockey player, Travis Roy, and current professors and authors Richard Lehr and Mitchell Zuckoff.

COM Talks, which is free to the public, will be held on Saturday, September 20th from 3-6 p.m. at the College of Communication in room 101. After the talks, all are welcomed to fun and food on the lawn where you can network with amazing people in various fields doing a variety of different work. OH, AND THERE WILL BE FREE (a grad student’s favorite word) ICE CREAM!!!

So, come listen to interesting, successful people talk about their work and get some great insight on “the real world.” I mean, come on, I think homework can wait while we spend a few hours on our futures and stomachs.

Founder, Owner & CEO of LA entertainment company honored by BU

By Iris Moore
MS Broadcast Journalism ’15
BU College of Communication

At Boston University’s College of Communication (COM), the beginning of a new semester also means the start to another year filled with exciting events for faculty and staff. Yes, it is important to get your schedule right and books bought, but it’s also important you are made aware of the once-a-year, beneficial networking events happening right now.

This Thursday, September 18th at 5:30 p.m., the College of Communication (COM) is hosting the 2014 Distinguished Alumni Awards at the School of Management. The event, which is free and open to the public, will honor some of COM’s most accomplished alumni. Previous alumni recipients who have attended the event include: – Co-Host of Market Place Morning Report and American Public Media, Jeremy C. Hobson (‘04) – White House Photographer, Peter J. Souza (’76), – Bravo’s Executive Vice President of Development & Talent, Andy Cohen (’90). The list goes on. If you have time, check it out here.

This year, you may get the opportunity to network with the BU COM alum who was the first African American to produce a CBS Schoolbreak Special. Yup, that’s right, Cleveland O’Neal III (COM ’78) is one of the four COM alums being honored at this year’s Distinguished Alumni Awards for his impressive accomplishments in the entertainment industry.

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O’Neal began his career at a young age when he was a child actor at the Cleveland Playhouse in Ohio, which is one of the League of Resident Theaters. During his undergraduate studies at Boston University’s College of Communication, O’Neal began planning what would become his privately held company Connection III Entertainment Corp.— producer of the weekly TV series “Made in Hollywood,” “Made in Hollywood: Teen Edition and “Live, Life and Win!”

As Founder, President, and CEO of the company, O’Neal has brought diversity across a variety of media platforms, including music, television and motion pictures. Connection III has received two Emmy nominations and was the recipient of the “Arts and Entertainment Company of the Year” Award from Los Angeles Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa.

Watch O’Neal’s interview with TVWeek reporter Andrew Krukowski to learn more about his TV series franchise, “Made in Hollywood”, that has a gross average audience of 5.2 million viewers.

So, make sure you join the BU COM community on Thursday night as we raise our glasses and toast Cleveland O’Neal III for his impressive career in the entertainment industry (yes, that’s right, an open bar and heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served). Go here to find out more or sign up for the event.