Tag Archives: internships

Winners of this year’s Distinguished Alumni Award offer advice for success

By Nikita Sampath
MS Broadcast Journalism ’16
BU College of Communication

If you walked around BU’s campus this past week, you probably noticed the numerous events being hosted for BU Alumni, faculty, staff and students. BU was smart in planning these events at a time when new grads were settling in and most likely thinking about where their degree might take them. These events were designed to provide networking opportunities, teach and inspire; after attending COM’s Distinguished Alumni Awards, I can personally say, BU’s mission was accomplished.

2014 Distinguished Alumni from L-R: Cleveland O’Neal III (COM ’78), Cynthia Cordes (COM ’01), Will Lautzenheiser (CAS ’96, COM ’07) and Bill Simmons (COM ’93). Photo, Katherine Taylor. — with Cleveland O’Neal, Cynthia Phillips Cordes, William Lautzenheiser and Bill Simmons at Boston University College of Communication (BU COM).

At the event, celebrated on Thursday at the School of Management, COM students and faculty were actively interacting with the alumni over tasty hors d’oeuvres and drinks. This year, COM honoured four of its alumni- – Cleveland O’Neal III, Cynthia Cordes, Bill Simmons and Will Lautzenheiser. Each of them had accomplished something from which we learned.

Cleveland O’Neal (COM ‘78), the first African American to produce a show on CBS, started out as an actor. While working on the CBS series, he built his own Emmy-nominated entertainment company, Connection III, from ground up. “Work hard” was his advice to students.
One step at a time.

Cynthia Cordes (COM ‘01) went from studying Journalism at COM to studying Law at Notre Dame. This year she featured on a national list of Top 250 Women in Litigation selected by Benchmark Litigation. She began her career with the U.S Department of of Justice where she led a task force on human trafficking. Now a partner at Husch Blackwell, she continues her anti-human trafficking efforts through the company’s Human Trafficking Legal Clinic, the first of its kind in the United States.
Be passionate about your work.

Bill Simmons (COM ‘97) is a name most American sports fans identify. He graduated with a degree in print journalism from COM but foresaw the potential of the internet even when his dad tried persuading him to stick to traditional print media. His blog The Sports Guy caught the attention of ESPN who hired him in 2001. Since then, he’s gone on to become the editor-in-chief of Grantland.com.
Trust your instincts.

Will Lautzenheiser (COM ‘07) was a student like one of us; he was fascinated by the Charles River and wanted to make a film about it. However, three years ago he lost his arms and legs to a deadly bacteria. At the event on Thursday, we watched his short documentary, Stumped, in which he featured and wrote. It tells the story of how he got used to his prosthetic legs and how he is now a stand-up, or sit-down comedian as he calls himself.
Life will give you lemons.

This BU alumni event was indeed a great way to begin the semester. It reminded us that hard work is the only way to success, and that we must make the most of networking opportunities.
Stay focused. Stay Inspired.

Founder, Owner & CEO of LA entertainment company honored by BU

By Iris Moore
MS Broadcast Journalism ’15
BU College of Communication

At Boston University’s College of Communication (COM), the beginning of a new semester also means the start to another year filled with exciting events for faculty and staff. Yes, it is important to get your schedule right and books bought, but it’s also important you are made aware of the once-a-year, beneficial networking events happening right now.

This Thursday, September 18th at 5:30 p.m., the College of Communication (COM) is hosting the 2014 Distinguished Alumni Awards at the School of Management. The event, which is free and open to the public, will honor some of COM’s most accomplished alumni. Previous alumni recipients who have attended the event include: – Co-Host of Market Place Morning Report and American Public Media, Jeremy C. Hobson (‘04) – White House Photographer, Peter J. Souza (’76), – Bravo’s Executive Vice President of Development & Talent, Andy Cohen (’90). The list goes on. If you have time, check it out here.

This year, you may get the opportunity to network with the BU COM alum who was the first African American to produce a CBS Schoolbreak Special. Yup, that’s right, Cleveland O’Neal III (COM ’78) is one of the four COM alums being honored at this year’s Distinguished Alumni Awards for his impressive accomplishments in the entertainment industry.

hollywoodreporter.com

O’Neal began his career at a young age when he was a child actor at the Cleveland Playhouse in Ohio, which is one of the League of Resident Theaters. During his undergraduate studies at Boston University’s College of Communication, O’Neal began planning what would become his privately held company Connection III Entertainment Corp.— producer of the weekly TV series “Made in Hollywood,” “Made in Hollywood: Teen Edition and “Live, Life and Win!”

As Founder, President, and CEO of the company, O’Neal has brought diversity across a variety of media platforms, including music, television and motion pictures. Connection III has received two Emmy nominations and was the recipient of the “Arts and Entertainment Company of the Year” Award from Los Angeles Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa.

Watch O’Neal’s interview with TVWeek reporter Andrew Krukowski to learn more about his TV series franchise, “Made in Hollywood”, that has a gross average audience of 5.2 million viewers.

So, make sure you join the BU COM community on Thursday night as we raise our glasses and toast Cleveland O’Neal III for his impressive career in the entertainment industry (yes, that’s right, an open bar and heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served). Go here to find out more or sign up for the event.

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Spotlight Abroad: Angela Milinazzo

By: Angela Milinazzo

Having been before, I was already enamored with London, its culture, and its people – both those who are proudly self-proclaimed Brits and those who, like me, have fortuitously found themselves welcomed into the diverse and dynamic city. When presented with the opportunity to return to London, I didn’t even give it a second thought.

Throw in the fact that I would be completing my master’s degree here and it was a done deal. A few weeks into the program and I have no doubt that this was the best decision for finishing my master’s education with Boston University.

“A few weeks into the program and I have no doubt that this was the best decision for finishing my master’s education with Boston University.”

Located just minutes away from Kensington Gardens, I live in the London borough of South Kensington with my fellow COMrades in BU’s Crofton building. I share a bedroom and on-suite bathroom with my roommate, Katie, and share a kitchen with six other COM students. We frequently congregate in the kitchen, where we, most obviously, share meals, but also share plans as we all are excited to explore both London and the other European cities close by.

Of course, we’re not just in London for the ample travel opportunities or the frequent adventures exploring London’s streets. A quick 15-minute walk takes us to Harrington Gardens, where I, along with the other 21 students attending the London program, go to class.

For the first half of the summer, I’m taking two classes, Global Marketing Communication and International Mass Media and Political Systems, which take place four hours per day Monday through Thursday.

After a weeklong summer break at the end of those courses, I start my internship with Purple PR, a fashion/beauty/lifestyle public relations agency, and work on a final project to help close out the master’s program. The second half of the summer will test not just our independence, but also our ability to adapt and integrate into London’s work culture. As we grow more confident and knowledgeable about both London and working/thinking from a global perspective, we will also be able to apply what we’ve learned through our final professional project. This gives us the opportunity to work with Tobe Berkovitz and Otto Lerbinger, two BU professors working with us here in London, to come up with a project that will effectively synthesize our work from previous semesters with our experience in London.

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Though the summer seems endless, I know that I, as well as my classmates, are very much aware that our time in London is fleeting and precious. Many of us already have trips booked for future weekends in places like Paris, Edinburgh, and Galway. Others are working through their lists of must-see spots around London, such as the National Galleries, Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, and Westminster Abbey. We’re all trying to make the most not only out of our invaluable experiences inside the classroom, but outside of it as well – an exciting and apt way to end our academic careers at Boston University.

*Angela is a graduate student in the Public Relations program participating in BU’s London Study Abroad Program. For more information on the program, click here

My Summer Internship

This time last year I was still settling into Boston. Classes started in September and I finally felt like I was getting into the groove of grad school. And had you asked me what I was planning to do over the summer – my answer undoubtedly would’ve been BU’s London program.

But that all changed, thanks in large part to one of my professors. As the spring semester came upon us, I applied for both the London program as well as a variety of public relations agency internships for backup. When I received an interview opportunity for Weber Shandwick, one of the leading global PR agencies, I found myself between two very appealing choices. Do I go to London, an experience of a lifetime, where I’m guaranteed an internship? Or – do I risk it for a potential paid agency internship that could likely set me up with the connections I’d need for a job? As appealing as London was (and still is), I knew New York was the smarter option. Agency experience is key in working in public relations – and I had yet to have the chance to work in one.

After I took the trip back home to New York and interviewed, I contacted one of my professors, knowing he had a lot of connections in the field. He reached out to the agency and put my name out there. I was hopeful. So, I waited and waited and waited…and waited (so forth) to hear back from Weber. Finally nearly a month and a half later I heard back. I got the internship! My professor really put himself out there to push for me to get the spot, so if there’s one thing I can tell you about BU it is: take advantage of the faculty and resources you have here. We all know communication often involves not only what you know but also who you know. Career services and your own professors can be a huge help in that regard.

Do I regret not going to London? Yes and no. Yes because, well…it’s London – that chance doesn’t come around too often. No, because a) I’ve been there before and b) I was able to meet and interact with vice presidents, account executives and group supervisors at the agency. I gained that agency experience that I knew I needed, I worked on a launch campaign and I was able to set myself up as a strong candidate for a future job. My summer in New York was a success and as I continue to make connections, I know I will put up a good fight in the job search after graduating. And who knows – maybe I’ll be lucky enough to live and work in London in the future.

Summer in Boston

This is my first summer as a Bostonian, and the final season in my first year here in town. I moved here last fall, I braved the winter and its blizzards, and I sneezed my way through the spring with the help of lots of Claritin. But now it’s summertime, and Boston is a very different place this time of year.

A big part of the difference is that Boston is chock-full of students for 9 months of the year. With over 30 colleges, there are 150,000 students living in the city.  This is what makes living here so much fun during the school year. With so many people of similar age, there is something fun going on 7 nights a week.  But when school lets out at the end of May, the mass exodus turns Beantown into a much quieter city…which is great!! Without actually going anywhere, I feel like I am getting a summer vacation right here at home. There are no lines to get into bars, I never have to wait for a table at restaurants, and the train is so empty I feel like I paid for a first class ticket. What is really great about the smaller crowds, is now that classes are out I actually have time to enjoy all the fun sites the city has to offer. We have been to Charlestown to see Bunker Hill. We have gone to Fenway to see the Red Sox. We went to Maine for a weekend where we saw a moose.  There is so much to see and do in the city and the surrounding area that it’s great to have the summer to explore.

There is work to be done, however. That’s what we are here for after all.

Plenty of BU COM Grad students stay here in the summer for internships. My buddy/classmate Greg works for the Red Sox television broadcast. My friend, and PR student, Emily is interning with a local PR firm. My friend, and Journalism student, Loren is working for a travel blog as their social media guru. I was lucky enough to convince the general manager of the campus radio station, WTBU, to let me do a daily sports radio show for the summer. Two of my fellow broadcast journalism classmates and I do a show Monday-Friday from 3-5 PM. The experience has been invaluable, as I don’t know many students who are getting the opportunity to do a live radio show every day. Between the hours of practice, the interviews we are doing, and the technical skills we are learning, we are getting a crash course in how to do live radio.

I have really enjoyed my first year in Boston, and each season has shown me something that I’ve never seen before. Fall was filled with new experiences, since I was just moving here and starting classes. Winter taught me what it really means to be cold, and that college hockey is amazing. In the spring the Red Sox got off to a hot start and showed me what it’s like to live in a great baseball city. And now it’s summer, and while the heat is giving me a true appreciation for air conditioning, Boston is proving to be a great place to live year round.