The Future of the Book, part 1

What is the future of the book? In the Core Curriculum, we treasure the experience of opening a text and transporting ourselves into a long-lost world and savoring the words of thinkers whose ideas are as alive today as they were hundreds of years ago.

How much of this experience depends on the artifact of a printed book?

How does this experience change if we read the book on a screen instead of holding the physical book in or hands? For that matter, how will academic life and the life of the mind change as technology advances?

We considered questions like these last year at the one-day conference on The Future of the Book, sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Core Curriculum.

What do you think? We would like to hear your response to these important questions.

The Core Blog will be consider the “future of the book” in posts throughout the coming year. To get things started, here’s the cover of a recent issue of The New Yorker, in which a reader plugs himself into his laptop and neglects his library shelves. The books show reactions that range from consternation to outright distress.

The New Yorker