Weekly Round-Up, 8-26-17

Greetings, scholars! Nervous about the approaching semester? Never fear! Our Core authors will always stand beside you, forever creeping into your mind whenever you try to write papers and complete assignments for other classes. (On their behalf, we’re sorry.)

  • This week in books: More millennials in the United States visited libraries last year than any other generation, citing interests in the communal spaces as well as programming like concerts and book discussions. (And, to top it off, Boston Public Library system is highlighted in this article! Excitement!!!)
  • Did you know that Sigmund Freud escaped to Hampstead, England, on the eve the Second World War, taking up residence not far from the Hogarth Press–helmed by Virginia and Leonard Woolf–which had taken on the task of printing his works in England since 1924?
  • A team of astronomers, Professor Elizabeth Blanton of BU among them, hopes that their studies of galaxy clusters might lead to a better understanding of the properties of dark matter and dark energy. According to Rachel Paterno-Mahler, another member of the team, Galaxy clusters are really good test-beds for learning about the cosmological parameters of our universe, like how much dark energy there is and how much dark matter there is.
  • Yesterday, August 25, marked the anniversary ofFriedrich Nietzsche’s death in 1900.
  • University of Southern California confronts controversy for the spelling of Shakespear(e)’s name on the base of a recently-unveiled bronze statue of Hecuba. “Over the centuries his surname has been spelled 20 different ways. USC chose an older spelling because of the ancient feel of the statue, even though it is not the most common form.” (Nice save, USC.)

Sculptor Christopher Slatoff stands with USC First Lady Niki C. Nikias and USC President C. L. Max Nikias before a towering Hecuba. (via USC)

Sculptor Christopher Slatoff stands with USC First Lady Niki C. Nikias and USC President C. L. Max Nikias before a towering Hecuba. (via USC)

That’ll do it for this week! We hope to see you again very soon.

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