Posts by: CAS Core Curriculum

Pericles and the Perils of Perception

Pericles’ famous funeral oration honoring fallen soldiers in The Pelopponesian War is an ode to Athens. He proclaims the glories of the state in great depth and detail, and calls on the families of the dead to remain steadfast in their patriotism. One of the Athenian virtues he praises is that of the informed democratic […]

War and Peace in the Bhagavad Gita

Wendy Doniger’s War and Peace in the Bhagavad Gita is possibly best described as a biography of the Bhagavad Gita. She explores the book’s history and the somewhat contradictory way an epic call to battle has come to be something of a pacifist icon. The Gita incorporates into its seven hundred verses many different sorts of insights, which […]

“The Meaning of Human Existence”

  Biologist Edward O. Wilson has spent his life studying evolutionary biology, writing books, and winning Pulitzer prizes, among other things. He is still going strong at 85 years old, and recently published “The Meaning of Human Existence,” a book intended to explain and convince the general public of the scientific theory of evolution. Drawing […]

“The Intelligent Plant”

Vegetarianism and veganism have been on the rise in recent years, and adherents often cite consideration of animal rights as a motivation. But what if they heard that plants can also feel pain? It is already well-known that plants respond to external stimuli such as sunlight, air quality, and other basic factors, but a mysterious […]

Wander with Odysseus: The Odyssey as an Alternate Reality Game

What if instead of simply reading about Odysseus’s journey, you could experience it with him? John Fallon, an innovative middle school teacher, had the idea to craft an alternate reality game (ARG) to help build enthusiasm for classics like the Odyssey  in his seventh-grade class. Rather than merely reading about the adventures of Odysseus in […]

Upcoming MFA Events

Wine, Poets, and Performers in Ancient Greece Opens September 16th ~ Gallery 215 A-C In mid-September, our reimagined Greek galleries open. Both the art and the literature of ancient Greece are the foundations of Western civilization. As these galleries demonstrate through innovative displays and interactives illuminating ancient works, Greek poetry and drama can be closely […]

Postcards to the Core

Howdy “ya’ll”! ONE WEEK and I’ll be back in Boston. I hope all of you are doing well and I can’t wait to see you all! Winona Geia sas, Core office! Greetings from Greece! We went here on Sunday! Watched Prof. Samons “frolick” gleefully. Thank you for the opportunity. With love, The BU Phillhellenes 2014 […]

The Core You Could Be Studying

Look at divisional now back to me now back at divisional now back to me Sadly, some people think divisional is “better” than Core but if you do take the Core you become an intellectual champion like me Look down back up Where are you? You’re in the Paradiso with a man well versed in […]

The Assyrian Dictionary: Completed After 90 Years

Pertaining to CC101’s study of Gilgamesh and ancient Mesopotamia, is this article on the completed Assyrian tongue. As a dead language that has not been spoken for two millennia, the project was started in 1921 and took 90 years to complete. Dr. Irving Finkel, a contributor to the project, describes it as “a heroic and […]

Montaigne: What do I know?

Relating to CC201′s study of Montaigne is an article by Liam Julian of The Weekly Standard, discussing the Essays. Here is an extract: Begun in 1572, the Essays is Montaigne’s 20-year examination of his own life, and not the product of that examination, either, but the examination itself. It contains more than a hundred essays and some […]