Posts by: CAS Core Curriculum

100+ books, free to those that want ‘em!

Core people read books, contend with books, collect books, re-read books, and are basically book people. If you’re reading this — as a student, alumnus, staff member, or friend of the Core — youvery likely are a book person, too. To that end, we invite you to peruse the list of books below. If you […]

Have It Your Way: Cheeseburgers and Moral Responsility

Here at the Core, we spend a great deal of time examining a wide range of perspectives on morality, returning semester after semester to examine questions such as “how do we define right and wrong?” and even “do right and wrong really exist?” As we explore these ethical questions through the lenses of science, literature, […]

Postcards to the Core: From Utah, July 2015

Our latest postcard comes from former Core office staffer, and Core alumna, Suzyn-Elayne Soler, now a member of the Admissions team for the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College at Florida Atlantic University. She was in in Salt Lake City, Utah, last week, traveling and meeting prospective students. Her report: Greetings from Salt Lake! Visited the […]

Recommended reading: “How to Build a Universe”

If you’ve been driving yourself batty, scouring Amazon and the shelves of your local bookstores in search of a copy of Building Universes…for Dummies, we know why you’ve been unsuccessful: that particular book does not exist. However, if you’re dead-set on building your own universe, look no further than Daniel Hudon’s “How to Build a […]

The Quest for Wu-Wei

As the core office is situated on a college campus, we have, ever so often, heard variations of this unfortunate conversation: Timmy: “How’d you do on the paper, Josh?” Josh: “I did alright. You?” Timmy: “Oh you know, just a 98. I’m surprised though. I started the book yesterday, watched TV until 1am. Wrote it […]

What We Lose if We Lose the Canon

The ease of publishing one’s writing online, in conjunction with the pleasure reading of popular fiction, may have changed our perception of the literary canon, says Arthur Krystal of The Chronicle Review. He fears a loss of appreciation for its greatness as new artists turn out works that will never have the same resonance as, say, a Shakespearean sonnet or a Homerian epic.

Tenth Circle Added to Rapidly Growing Hell

To current and former Core students, Dante’s Inferno brings to mind images of a nine-tiered Hell filled with sinners of various sorts. CC102 students, studious as they are, know the nine circles and their inhabitants like the back of their hands. Reporting by the Onion, though, indicates that Dante’s descriptions are out-of-date: recent years have […]

Raskolnikov: “SCREW EVERYTHING”

Look, we’re readers in the Core. We’re readers of big books, huge ones, even. But there’s a certain point when the book goes on too long. We’ve all been there: Crime and Punishment. Perhaps you’re thinking, “maybe I should read that canonical novel!” I’m going to stop you right there. Emphasis mine. Luckily, this is […]

Who was Homer, really?

Homer is known to CC 101 students as the author of the Odyssey, but surprisingly enough, not much more is known about his life story. A recent article published in the National Geographic suggests that Homer wasn’t a person, but a tradition.

Uber reviews for Charon, boatman of Hades

The taxi service Uber is taking Boston by force. With its mixed reviews in the media, riders wonder about their drivers as well as what services are offered outside Beantown. Lucky for us at the Core office, Professor Hamill left a copy of the New Yorker open to an article providing Uber  reviews for Charon, […]