Posts by: zakbos

Esposito introducing Bible lecture with Elie Wiesel

This past Tuesday, September 9th, Prof. Michael Zank of the Department of Religion lectured to students in the first-year Humanities about the Hebrew Bible. His talk was introduced with some very moving comments by Prof. Stephen Esposito (Classics), the course coordinator. Prof. Esposito has agreed to let us republish his introduction here on the Core […]

Community news: Javadov, Tabatabai, Gossen, Hamill

As you know, Core is more than a set of classes—it is also a community, whose members are the students, faculty, and alumni that have all shared experiences in and outside of those classrooms. One of the things that happens in a community is that people stay in touch. In keeping with this, we’re going […]

BU in Athens: the Philhellenes’ Summer Trip, 2014

{ A guest post from Prof. James Uden of the Department of Classics; cross-posted from the Classics departmental homepage. } Do Athenians ever sleep? No doubt many of the BU students who spent a month in Athens this summer were already accustomed to staying up late, but the Greeks really showed them how to make […]

Joseph Luzzi on Dante, and why some books stay and others go

Students just entering the first-year Humanities haven’t yet encountered the Divine Comedy of Dante in the Core classroom… but for sure, they won’t forget it. Many Core alumni report that their exploration of Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso in seminar with their Core classmates was a formative part of their undergraduate experience. Accordingly, we keep our […]

From the Core Journal: “The Analects of Prof. Nelson”

These “Analects of Professor Nelson” were recorded during class discussion by Core student Matthew Spencer, and published in The Journal of the Core Curriculum, Vol. IX, Spring 2000: The Professor said of Rousseau’s Confessions, “Boy, it’s so nitty, and it’s so gritty!” Only then did Matthew understand. When Matthew thought he really understood Rousseau, the Professor said, […]

Yet More Core Books

The Core recently did a survey of syllabi in programs at other schools offering courses that are like Core in method and structure: primary texts, organized chronologically, giving students a working knowledge of the foundational works and ideas of our shared cultural heritage. While many of the books we saw on those other syllabi were […]

David Green on Core and the canon

Prompted by Dean Sapiro’s lecture on Mary Wollstonecraft to question why there are so few women authors in the Core Humanities, Prof. David Green had his CC 202 students this week  momentarily put aside Pride and Prejudice and the question of whether happiness in marriage is a matter of chance to consider the criteria for […]

A Picture of Human Knowledge

On Friday of the week before Spring Break, Prof. Green was speaking with his classes about the importance of “human knowledge.” What brought that topic to mind? Well, on his way to work, walking down Beacon Street through Coolidge Corner, he’d seen the book pictured above propped up by some unknown person, against a lamp […]

Core on the Metro

This photo (courtesy Prof. Hamill) shows the Core expedition to NYC in December 2013 to see a puppet-show performance of Plato’s Republic. Which is the kind of thing Core people do for fun. Core.

Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Sung

In anticipation of the lecture on Shakespeare’s sonnets by Prof. Ricks next week in CC 201, here are performances of the Bard’s fourteeners, set to music.   No. 29 (Rufus Wainwright)