Category: Analects

Analects of the Core: Goethe on Faust’s studies

Well, that’s Philosophy I’ve read, / And Law and Medicine, and I fear / Theology, too, from A to Z; / Hard studies all, that have cost me dear. / And so I sit, poor silly man / No wiser now than when I began. [Habe nun, ach! Philosophie, / Juristerey und Medicin, / Und […]

Analects of the Core: Fry on Homer’s genius

Stephen Fry’s BBC mini-series “Fry’s Planet Word” discusses The Odyssey: “Homer’s genius was to create vivid, archetypal scenes that transcended time and place. The Sirens episode is only a few paragraphs long, yet has become embedded in our collective memory.” Check out the video:

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on walls built of ruins

The walls that fence our fields, as well as modern Rome, and not less the Parthenon itself, are all built of ruins. – Henry David Thoreau

Analects of the Core: Emerson on the Parthenon as a gem

Earth proudly wears the Parthenon as the best gem among her zone. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Analects of the Core: Pericles on mighty monuments

Mighty indeed are the marks and monuments we have left. Men of the future will wonder at us, as all men do today. – Pericles

Analects of the Core: Emerson on manners and early Greek art

There are men whose manners have the same essential splendor as the simple and awful sculpture on the friezes of the Parthenon, and the remains of the earliest Greek art. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Analects of the Core: Mercouri on the Parthenon Marbles

In view of Prof. Fred Kleiner’s lecture this Tuesday on the art and politics of the Greek Acropolis, this week’s analects all concern the Athenian Parthenon. You must understand what the Parthenon Marbles mean to us. They are our pride. They are our sacrifices. They are our noblest symbol of excellence. They are a tribute […]

Analects of the Core: Hume on science and learning

The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads through the avenues of science and learning; and whoever can either remove any obstruction in this way, or open up any new prospect, ought, so far, to be esteemed a benefactor to mankind. – David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

Analects of the Core: Locke on laws without authority

When any one, or more, shall take upon them to make laws, whom the people have not appointed to do so, they make laws without authority, which the people are not therefore bound to obey… [and] may constitute to themselves a new legislative, being in full liberty to resist the force of those, who without […]

Analects of the Core: Homer on the gods’ attention to Telemakhos

“Reason and heart will give you words, Telemakhos; and a spirit will counsel others. I should say the gods were never indifferent to your life.” – Homer, from The Odyssey Book III, lines 31-33. Translation by Robert Fitzgerald.