Category: Art

Weekly Round-Up, 12-2-16

Happy December, scholars! Take a break from perishing under the weight of final papers and take a look at this week’s round-up of links. Our Natural Science scholars will be interested to know that archaeologists recently discovered a 7,300-year-old human fingerprint, the oldest in the region, on a shard of pottery. Dan Chiasson, reviewer and […]

From The Chicago Maroon: Read it and Weep

(“Read it and Weep” might not have been the best entry into one’s column). As all of you probably know, our world has experienced a tragedy recently, and some of us are still finding it difficult to recover from the sounding of the death-knell: Bob Dylan has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature: Literature? […]

From the American Library Association: Parthenon Made Out of Banned Literature

Documenta 14 is a series of art exhibitions, hosted every five years to commemorate the values of democracy and freedom of expression–hard-won, but too easily taken for granted. Behind the exhibit is Marta Minujin, who sought inspiration for the exhibit from one of her earlier works. In 1983, after the dissolution of dictatorship in Argentina, […]

How Homer Matters

“The core of what is valuable about those epics is that they are intensely human. … It is an absolutely down-the-barrel look at the realities of who we are.” In his lecture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, author Adam Nicholson argues the importance of Homer thousands of years after he wrote the Iliad and […]

From History: 10 Literary Classics That Have Been Banned

It seems like a rite of passage for any book aspiring to achieve classic status that it must endurea period of resistance fromthe culture in which it first appears, and from which it is conceived. Midwifing is the author’s own genius, which itself resists a clean conception and, finding flaws, exposing the eccentricities of the […]

Friday Weekly Round-Up, 10-21-16

Presenting the inaugural weekly round-up of links! In this newest addition to the Core blog, we gather the latest in Core-related news, events, and insights from around the Internet. Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016. Prof. Christopher Ricks, Dylan expert as well as Core professor, must be thrilled. Satan in a jumpsuit: […]

From the Times Literary Supplement: Dylan’s voice, music, and words

A visionary trinity. ProfesSir Christopher Ricks is one of the most energetic octogenarians we have on the literary scene. Age has clearly not impaired his hearing, which has been and remains so keenly attune to the sounds and subtleties of (among others) Milton and Tennyson, that it has served as an aid for our own. […]

At The End, A Beginning: A playlist to accompany the books of Genesis and Exodus

In case you need any help resonating with the gravitas of these texts….. 1. Bob Marley’s “Exodus” Marley’s lyrics like “We’re the generation…trod through great tribulation” in this classic reggae hit lend millennial readers of the Hebrew Bible some additional encouragement in a time of much political upheaval in the United States.   2. Berliner […]

“That’s Gilgamesh’d Up”: Recreating the Music of Ancient Sumer

We know what you’re thinking. Gilgamesh… sung? No, it’s not the newest historical musical, hoping to capitalize on the hysteria for history-themed performances catalyzed by Hamilton. We’re talked here aboutthe opening lines of the Epic of Gilgamesh performed by musician Peter Pringle. The piece is not only played on a Sumerian lute called a “gish-gu-di” […]

From Vox: Trumps grab ‘em by the p***y line anticipated by 600 years

That “Canterbury” contains “Cant-“, and that “cant” shares a precarious assonance with another word, suggests that one of our most literate bards and bawds, Chaucer, might have anticipated Trump’s latest perversion. This possibility was recently illuminated by Constance Grady at Vox. Or, less likely, Trump might have been paying tribute in his comment to some […]