Category: Art

From History: 10 Literary Classics That Have Been Banned

It seems like a rite of passage for any book aspiring to achieve classic status that it must endurea period of resistance fromthe culture in which it first appears, and from which it is conceived. Midwifing is the author’s own genius, which itself resists a clean conception and, finding flaws, exposing the eccentricities of the […]

Friday Weekly Round-Up, 10-21-16

Presenting the inaugural weekly round-up of links! In this newest addition to the Core blog, we gather the latest in Core-related news, events, and insights from around the Internet. Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016. Prof. Christopher Ricks, Dylan expert as well as Core professor, must be thrilled. Satan in a jumpsuit: […]

From the Times Literary Supplement: Dylan’s voice, music, and words

A visionary trinity. ProfesSir Christopher Ricks is one of the most energetic octogenarians we have on the literary scene. Age has clearly not impaired his hearing, which has been and remains so keenly attune to the sounds and subtleties of (among others) Milton and Tennyson, that it has served as an aid for our own. […]

At The End, A Beginning: A playlist to accompany the books of Genesis and Exodus

In case you need any help resonating with the gravitas of these texts….. 1. Bob Marley’s “Exodus” Marley’s lyrics like “We’re the generation…trod through great tribulation” in this classic reggae hit lend millennial readers of the Hebrew Bible some additional encouragement in a time of much political upheaval in the United States.   2. Berliner […]

“That’s Gilgamesh’d Up”: Recreating the Music of Ancient Sumer

We know what you’re thinking. Gilgamesh… sung? No, it’s not the newest historical musical, hoping to capitalize on the hysteria for history-themed performances catalyzed by Hamilton. We’re talked here aboutthe opening lines of the Epic of Gilgamesh performed by musician Peter Pringle. The piece is not only played on a Sumerian lute called a “gish-gu-di” […]

From Vox: Trumps grab ‘em by the p***y line anticipated by 600 years

That “Canterbury” contains “Cant-“, and that “cant” shares a precarious assonance with another word, suggests that one of our most literate bards and bawds, Chaucer, might have anticipated Trump’s latest perversion. This possibility was recently illuminated by Constance Grady at Vox. Or, less likely, Trump might have been paying tribute in his comment to some […]

From The New York Times: Can You Read a Book the Wrong Way?

Some people are so religiously devoted to a method of reading that we may properly call them Methodists. Others feel the text should be all things to all men, which is good politics but bad for criticism. For if every interpretation is welcomed open-armed, then little room is left for pressing one reading against any […]

Another video game takes on the classics

Guest post by Core House RA, Brianna Randolph (CAS ’17) When you take Core, you scrutinize every line in the works of Emily Dickinson, Homer, and Nietzsche, as you analyze and critique their viewpoints on life. After that kind training, it’s only natural that you when leave Core, you notice more. All sorts of details outside the worlds […]

The Aeneid: Whose side are you on?

Are you #TeamDido or #TeamAeneas? Here at the office, we’re split on the question of who to root for. Prof. David Green — an ardent supporter of Team Aeneas — sympathizes with Dido’s plight, but recognizes the importance of duty over impious furor. However! Cat Dossett (CAS ’18) thinks that Dido doesn’t need Prof. Green’s sympathy. […]

Priceless statues now open to the public

Since the 1960s, anaristocratic, Italian familyhas kept hundredsof ancient Greek and Roman statues hiddenfrom the public eye.After many failed attempts in opening a private museum, the Torlonia family finally started negotiations with the Italian government. Now about 60-90 pieces will start traveling the worldin places such as the rest of Europe and America. The familyowns […]