Category: Art

From The Chronicle of Higher Education: Engineers Need the Liberal Arts, Too

STEM has its roots in the humanities. If our intellectual foundations are uprooted, then, naturally, the natural sciences and their applications are in danger of withering away. This is a strong reason for the protests that followedPresident Trump’s beginning attempts to deforest our education, which might have had in mindthe prospect of recreating America in […]

A Home in Ruin: The Work of Mohamad Hafez at the Lanoue Gallery

Last Sunday, April 2nd, a solo show opened at the Lanoue Gallery, located not far from us on Harrison Ave. Featuring artwork by Syrian artist Mohamad Hafez, currently an architect in New Haven, Connecticut, the gallery is a window into a miniature world in ruin that reflects the modern-day destruction in Syria. “He wanted to […]

W.E.B. Du Bois and the Paris Exposition

At the turn of the twentieth century, author, sociologist, and activist W.E.B. Du Bois traveled to Europe for the Paris Exposition alongside collaborators Thomas J. Calloway and Daniel Murray. There, numerous photographs, patents, books, and more would make up an exhibition entitled “The Exhibit of American Negroes,” which showcased African-American life. Among these glimpses of […]

From The Weekly Standard: What We Know of Shakespeare from His (Known) Portraits

Blake Seitz at The Weekly Standard reviews Portraits of Shakespeare by Katherine Duncan-Jones, an absorbing study, we are told, by an author who flouts the rule that tells us we cannot judge a book by its cover. Or if we cannot judge Hamlet from its cover, we can at least make a judgment about its […]

TEDTalks: Elizabeth Lev, Michelangelo, and the Great Theater of Life

What is the unheard story of the Sistine Chapel? Art historian Elizabeth Lev intends to tell us, taking us on a tour through Michelangelo’s series of frescos and what she considers “the great theater of life.” Against the backdrop of Columbus’s voyage to the Americas, an age of exploration, Michelangelo took on the Sistine Chapel […]

Florence, Italy, Comes to Boston: Botticelli at the MFA

An exhibition entitled “Botticelli and the Search for the Divine: Florentine Painting between the Medici and the Bonfires of the Vanities” is set to tour the United States this year, and the MFA is one of the stops on its list. A collaboration between our own MFA Boston, the Muscarella Museum of Art in Virginia, […]

Theaster Gates’s “But to Be a Poor Race”

“To be a poor man is hard, but to be a poor race in a land of dollars is the very bottom of hardships.” – W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903) At Regen Projects in Los Angeles, a powerful art show is taking place. Along stark white walls are data rendered into painted […]

Rembrandt: Style and Observation

In a lecture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, curator of the Department of European Paintings Walter Liedtke takes a look at the life and works of the 17th-century Dutch artist Rembrandt. Over the course of the lecture, we can see the influence of the Old Masters in the artist’s work […]

Weekly Round-Up, 12-7-2016

Hellooo, scholars! Can you believe that the last full week of classes of the semester is coming to a close? We hope your papers, projects, and exams go swimmingly. In an art show organized by the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the Swedish Embassy, the Vatican will display works by Rembrandt for the […]

Weekly Round-Up, 12-2-16

Happy December, scholars! Take a break from perishing under the weight of final papers and take a look at this week’s round-up of links. Our Natural Science scholars will be interested to know that archaeologists recently discovered a 7,300-year-old human fingerprint, the oldest in the region, on a shard of pottery. Dan Chiasson, reviewer and […]