Category: Curriculum

Applying Confucian Ethics to International Relations

In view of CC102′s study of the Analects of Confucius, the Core presents an interesting discussion of Confucian ethics when applied to international relations. Here is a sample: Chinese ethics is a deontological system that has a continuity spanning a range from personal to public concerns, without differentiation. A good society, a good state, and […]

CC204: Living Wage Calculator

This spring, the class of CC204 has been looking at inequality in terms of race, gender, social class and financial standing. “Poverty in America” has provided a very useful tool to investigate inequality in terms wages across the United States, the Living Wage Calculator: http://bit.ly/Ykr2NZ Simply enter your home town and find out how much money […]

Ron Rosenbaum on the Jane Austen ‘hype’

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the Core offers an article by Ron Rosenbaum, titled Is Jane Austen Overhyped?- Evaluating her literary merit amid the Anniversary reverence. The subject it deals with is important, and relevant to all classics- how much good does exaggerated celebration their anniversaries really do? Here is a […]

Adam and Dog

The Core is delighted to share with students this Oscar-nominated short animated film by Minkyu Lee, named Adam and Dog. It is a compelling take on the creation story of The Book of Genesis (studied in CC101) from the point of view of a playful dog, which comes into contact with the first man in […]

Analects of the Core: Ferry on storms

In view of the coming storm tomorrow, the Core would like to remind everyone to remain calm and intellectual. To aid this process, here is a sample from David Ferry’s Epic of Gilgamesh (studied in CC101), on the relevant topic of storms: “In the early hours of the next morning dawning there was the noise of […]

Twists on John Keats

The Core presents a poem by Dan Beachy-Quick titled The Cricket and The Grasshopper, named after the poem by Romantic poet John Keats, whose work is studied in the CC202 Core class. Here is the Dan B-Q poem: The senseless leaf   in the fevered hand Grows hot, near blood-heat, but never grows Green. Weeks ago the […]

The Saxophone and ‘The Odyssey’

Relating to the study of The Odyssey by CC101 every fall, here is an interesting fact: great saxophonist Chris Potter draws inspiration from the Greek epic for his music. In the article discussing the matter, Potter is quoted as saying: I read it [the Odyssey] in high school and thought it was cool but didn’t […]

CC106: The Sound of Music

Today, February 5th, Biology Professor Jelle Atema (Doctorandus, University of Utrecht (Netherlands); PhD, University of Michigan), held a lecture titled “The sound of music: frog calls and the design of music halls“, for the Core class CC106. CC106 is designed to round out students’ exploration of the natural sciences by focusing on the science of life. The professors […]

Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass

Relating to CC202′s study of Walt Whitman’s work, here is an extract of the article by Claire Kelley on the poet’s whereabouts while he was writing in 1855: “Whitman-iacs” like NYU Professor Karen Karbiener have paid their respects to the ghost of Walt Whitman by visiting the unassuming white house that stands one story taller than […]

John Keats: “This Living Hand”

Some spring semesters, CC202 studies the works of John Keats. Here is an interesting untitled fragment the Romantic poet scribbled in a margin: This living hand, now warm and capable Of earnest grasping, would, if it were cold And in the icy silence of the tomb, So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights […]