Category: Friday Fun

The Onion: Tenth circle added to Dante’s Hell

The Onion rarely fails to deliver… this time it is their excellent twist on Dante’s Inferno which has caught the Core’s attention. All those who remember CC102′s Dantean struggles will appreciate this. Here is an extract: CITY OF DIS, NETHER HELL–After nearly four years of construction at an estimated cost of 750 million souls, Corpadverticus, […]

Have you ever lied about reading a book?

Even the most erudite and cultured Core students and faculty have at some point in their lives been placed in a sticky situation where lying about having read a book is the easiest way out. A useful post from The Guardian gives us a study of the top ten books that people have pretended to […]

Montaigne: The First Blogger

Relating to CC201′s recent study of Montaigne, Shaun Kenney discusses the idea of the 16th century French essayist as being a proto-blogger. Even though his writings came centuries before blogging and the internet, let alone the idea of a computer, it’s easy to see Montaigne’s essays being published through a popular blog on WordPress or […]

See the new Core T-shirts!

For more information on our T-shirts, visit the Core office in CAS 119!

Book the Size of a Ladybug Contains Genesis I

The University of Iowa library contains over 4,000 books that can fit into one’s palm. One book, however, has come to the attention of The Atlantic. This pea-sized volume measures a mere 0.138 inches square and 0.04 inches thick, so tiny it cannot be read with the naked eye. Recently library staff put the miniature […]

Core Banquet: Invitations!

To all Core scholars: You are invited to next week’s Core Banquet; we’re very much looking forward to the occasion. We would like to invite you to submit your shout-outs and photos, so that they can be inserted into the slide show that will be playing throughout the evening. Any photos (of Core friends, classes, […]

Trojan Women Performances!

Among the greatest of all antiwar dramas, Trojan Women meditates on the moments of individual choice that separate death and life, despair and hope, future and past. In a contemporary adaptation by Jocelyn Clarke, characters such as Odysseus who were formerly seen but not heard appear, and live original music underscores the timeless tale. Acclaimed […]

‘How To Pronounce It’ by Alan S.C. Ross

On a lighter note, let us explore pronunciation. In his article for The Spectator, Mark Mason discusses the strange but interesting book, How To Pronounce It, written by Alan S.C. Ross in 1970. Here is a sample: It took me quite a while to be sure that the book isn’t a spoof after all. ‘Gone’, we’re told, […]

Lowell House Opera’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The official event description, for April 3rd, 5th, and 6th: With this year’s production, Lowell House Opera joins the worldwide festivities celebrating the centennial year of Benjamin Britten, one of the most influential composers of the 20th century and greatest composers in British music history. A master of modern opera, Britten skillfully captures the magical […]

The Economist on Enjambment

The Core presents an article from The Economist, which discusses enjambment’s popularity and origins. Here is an extract: In “The Force of Poetry”, Christopher Ricks, formerly the Oxford Professor of Poetry who is now at Boston University, writes elegantly of the way enjambment can make language seem elastic: Lineation in verse creates units which may […]