Category: Great Personalities

Ibn al-Haytham on Scientific Methodology

Egyptian scientist, Ibn al-Haytham (AD 950-1040), is hailed as the father of modern optics and experimental physics. Also, he’s apparently one of the first to make a statement on scientific methodology: The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them, […]

Another Facet of William Blake

Who was William Blake? Ask a CC202 student and they’ll tell you he was an English Romantic poet. They’re right but that’s not all. Blake was also a talented artist and many of his subjects will appear familiar to keen-eyed core students. We thought we’d take a moment to share a bit of this lesser […]

e.e. cummings, the fearless

It seems impossible, sometimes, to delight in the new and exciting. Look at early critics’ and the general public’s reaction to most of modernism for instance. Scorned, scandalized, generally rejected (thank god enough liked it to keep it preserved). And the new can be exhausting in whole other ways. Most of us moved towns even […]

Progressing through Poetry

The late 19th and early 20th century gave birth to some of our world’s favorite poets and poetry, something that could be written off as simple proximity, but we at Core believe what makes these writers so important was not only the still resonating effects of political and societal changes they commented on but also […]

Voltaire & the Republic of Letters

CC202 has just moved on from Candide. Voltaire strikes even the casual reader as a captivating persona, with wit and intelligence. However, Voltaire’s role in the “Republic of Letters” is certainly worth a mention. To escape arrest, Voltaire lived at Cirey for fifteen years. He wrote a steady stream of letters to stay connected with his friends in […]

Call Me Burroughs: A Life

In the 1930′s, William S. Burroughs spent a good four years in our beautiful city of Boston. Bookforum recently reviewed Barry Miles’ biography of the author, titled Call Me Burroughs: A Life. Here is an extract: William S. Burroughs lived the kind of life few contemporary American novelists seek to emulate. A roll call of his sins: He […]

Political Vonnegut

Good morning, scholars! How’re you feeling? Has the second round of midterms got you down? Finals seeming close? Excited to go home for Thanksgiving? We are. You’re doing well? Haven’t given up yet we see. Good. Let’s talk about war. To be more specific, Kurt Vonnegut’s short yet humorous, in the sick way only Vonnegut […]

Alumni Profiles: Danielle Isaacs

(Core ’07 CAS ’09) Years at Boston University: 4 years. Current location: Washington DC. Company and Title: Fine Art Specialist at Weschler’s Auctioneers and Appraisers Recent activities: Danielle writes: I completed my MA in fine and decorative art at the Sotheby’s Institute in London in 2011. I organized a sale of vintage film posters at Weschler’s from […]

Machiavelli’s notion of truth

Earlier this week we discussed Machiavelli’s potent shock-value. Now, Arts & Letter Daily has linked us to The New Criterion‘s post on Machiavelli’s philosophical musings of truth. The claim is that they are just as important as his political work. ALDaily writes: “I depart from the orders of others.” With that, Machiavelli reconceived both politics and philosophy. […]

How to think of the Web

From Prof. Jon Westling‘s syllabus for his discussion section of CC 202 in Spring 2004 The Internet [like fire, money, science, water, and other elemental entities] can be a helpful servant, but it is a bad master. In the disciplines of the humanities and the social sciences, unlike in some scientific disciplines, it is not customary […]