Category: Uncategorized

Famous Winters and Famous Symphonies

As February continues to barrage us with snow and ice, cold winds and cloudy skies, it can seem to many of us, especially those from warmer climes, that winter will never end, the snow will never melt, the days will never grow longer. At such a time, it can be nice to get a little […]

Beethoven’s 9th Symphony

Today students in CC202 will be treated with a lecture on Beethoven by the Boston Conservatory’s Professor Elizabeth Seitz. Here are two excellent performances of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony: Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Abbado conduting the Berlin Philharmonic All are welcome to come to the lecture in CAS B12 at 12:30 pm today to enjoy […]

The Advantages of a BU ID

A Boston University student ID has always had the power to get you in to the MFA for free, but just this semester, you can go the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum as well! Now that’s good enough of an incentive for most of us, but for the few unconvinced, here’s a brief article that might […]

I Bet You Thought Neil DeGrasse Tyson Was the World’s Richest Astrophysicist

I like my progressive/arena/opera rock the way I like my education: Far-reaching in the realms of content and style, influenced by timeless masters of the past, and damn groovy. I write of the latter in reference to an integral part of the CC105 curriculum; that is, learning to bump to Professor Alan Marscher’s sweet, sweet […]

Call Me Burroughs: A Life

In the 1930′s, William S. Burroughs spent a good four years in our beautiful city of Boston. Bookforum recently reviewed Barry Miles’ biography of the author, titled Call Me Burroughs: A Life. Here is an extract: William S. Burroughs lived the kind of life few contemporary American novelists seek to emulate. A roll call of his sins: He […]

Blood Making Its Comeback

Few people were as obsessed with blood as the Ancient Romans. Their main form of entertainment, for instance, involved the violent, dramatic deaths of gladiators, and of course their empire was filled with the blood of enemies. These days, it’s a bit less acceptable to force people to fight for the death so you can […]

Listening to Poetry

Listening to a poem can change everything. As you’ve read before on the Core Blog, James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake seems much less incomprehensible when Joyce is reading it. But what about poetry, so focused on the language and word play, frequently taking at least three readings to understand fully? Yeah, listening to those read can […]

Frank Hurley: Color Photographs of the Antarctic in 1915

Color photography has been around far longer than often assumed. Attempts had been made as early as the 1840s and in the mid 19th century several techniques were developed, although no affordable methods were readily available until the mid 20th century. One early technique was the Paget process, most memorably used by Australian photographer James […]

Fun Fact for Saturday

All of us at the Core office have our little thing that is just sooooo annoying we can’t even stand it. For some of us, it’s the inherent sexism behind a guy holding a door open for a girl; for some it’s using who instead of whom, and for some it’s someone not having read […]

Political Vonnegut

Good morning, scholars! How’re you feeling? Has the second round of midterms got you down? Finals seeming close? Excited to go home for Thanksgiving? We are. You’re doing well? Haven’t given up yet we see. Good. Let’s talk about war. To be more specific, Kurt Vonnegut’s short yet humorous, in the sick way only Vonnegut […]