Tagged: Analects

From the Core Journal: “The Analects of Prof. Nelson”

These “Analects of Professor Nelson” were recorded during class discussion by Core student Matthew Spencer, and published in The Journal of the Core Curriculum, Vol. IX, Spring 2000: The Professor said of Rousseau’s Confessions, “Boy, it’s so nitty, and it’s so gritty!” Only then did Matthew understand. When Matthew thought he really understood Rousseau, the Professor said, […]

Analects of the Core: Tocqueville on complacent legislators

Today’s analect relates to CC203′s study of the foundation of social sciences: Propitious circumstances and good laws might succeed in drawing to the legislature of a democratic people men very superior to those who are returned by the Americans to Congress ; but nothing will ever prevent the men of slender abilities who sit there […]

Analects of the Core: Darwin on the confidence of the ignorant

Today’s analect was inspired by Core alumni Tim Martinez (Core ’07-’09, CAS ’11) with reference to the study of Evolution and Society occurring in CC203, which Tim marks as one of his favorite courses he’s taken here at BU.  Since taking it, he’s maintained a strong interest in Sociology, but has persisted in his IR […]

Analects of the Core: Montaigne on fear

The Core wishes students and faculty a very fruitful and enjoyable New Year and semester, and welcomes everyone back to the trials and tribulations of intellectual life. To boost students’ courage for the coming months, and instill some Core spirit, here is today’s analect: “A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears.”

Analects of the Core: Engels on revolution

But the anti-authoritarians demand that the authoritarian political state be abolished at one stroke, even before the social conditions that gave birth to it have been destroyed. They demand that the first act of the social revolution shall be the abolition of authority. Have these gentlemen ever seen a revolution? A revolution is certainly the […]

Analects of the Core: Hobbes on the Good

From Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan: Aristotle and other heathen philosophers define good and evil by the appetite of men; and well enough, as long as we consider them governed every one by his own law. For int eh condition of me that have no other law but their own appetites, there can be no general rule […]

Analects of the Core: Goethe on Faust’s studies

Well, that’s Philosophy I’ve read, / And Law and Medicine, and I fear / Theology, too, from A to Z; / Hard studies all, that have cost me dear. / And so I sit, poor silly man / No wiser now than when I began. [Habe nun, ach! Philosophie, / Juristerey und Medicin, / Und […]

Analects of the Core: Fry on Homer’s genius

Stephen Fry’s BBC mini-series “Fry’s Planet Word” discusses The Odyssey: “Homer’s genius was to create vivid, archetypal scenes that transcended time and place. The Sirens episode is only a few paragraphs long, yet has become embedded in our collective memory.” Check out the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6W4i6sWCbk0&t=8m22s

Analects of the Core: Emerson on the Parthenon as a gem

Earth proudly wears the Parthenon as the best gem among her zone. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Analects of the Core: Hawthorne on the burden of the past

Yesterday I went out at about twelve, and visited the British Museum; an exceedingly tiresome affair. It quite crushes a person to see so much at once; and I wandered from hall to hall with a weary and heavy heart, wishing (Heaven forgive me!) that the Elgin marbles and the frieze of the Parthenon were […]