Tagged: Analects

Analects of the Core: Emerson on manners and early Greek art

There are men whose manners have the same essential splendor as the simple and awful sculpture on the friezes of the Parthenon, and the remains of the earliest Greek art. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Analects of the Core: Mercouri on the Parthenon Marbles

In view of Prof. Fred Kleiner’s lecture this Tuesday on the art and politics of the Greek Acropolis, this week’s analects all concern the Athenian Parthenon. You must understand what the Parthenon Marbles mean to us. They are our pride. They are our sacrifices. They are our noblest symbol of excellence. They are a tribute […]

Analects of the Core: Homer on the gods’ attention to Telemakhos

“Reason and heart will give you words, Telemakhos; and a spirit will counsel others. I should say the gods were never indifferent to your life.” – Homer, from The Odyssey Book III, lines 31-33. Translation by Robert Fitzgerald.

Analects of the Core: Adams on perspective

This is rather as if you imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, ‘This is an interesting world I find myself in – an interesting hole I find myself in – fits me rather neatly, doesn’t it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!’ […]

Analects of the Core: Confucius on the force of words

Without knowing the force of words, it is impossible to know men. – Confucius, Analects (Book 20, Chapter 3)

Analects of the Core: Cervantes on reaching the unreachable

One man scorned and covered with scars still strove with his last ounce of courage to reach the unreachable stars; and the world was better for this. – Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

Analects of the Core: Feynman on uncertainty in science

I would now like to turn to a third value that science has. It is a little more indirect, but not much. The scientist has a lot of experience with ignorance and doubt and uncertainty, and this experience is of very great importance, I think. When a scientist doesn’t know the answer to a problem, […]

Analects of the Core: Darwin on sympathy

The more efficient causes of progress seem to consist of a good education during youth whilst the brain is impressible, and of a high standard of excellence, inculcated by the ablest and best men, embodied in the laws, customs and traditions of the nation, and enforced by public opinion. It should, however, be borne in […]

Analects of the Core: Homer on the father figure

Friend, let me put it in the plainest way. My mother says I am his son; I know not surely.  Who has known his own engendering? I wish at least I had some happy man as father, growing old in his house– but unknown death and silence are the fate of him that, since you […]

Analects of the Core: The Old Testament on dust

For dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return. – Genesis 3:19