Tagged: Art

Reviewing the Old Testament

Ridley Scott is known for creating epic films. Gladiator, Blade Runner, Alien. His films leave the viewers exhausted after dragging them through hours of emotional barbed wire. Try watching Rutger Hauer’s death without feeling empty inside. You, like him, will die, and everything will be lost. It’s very sad. Thank goodness Scott’s new project won’t […]

When a Picture Captures a Thousand Words

Art can make or break a book. Look at book covers: the stately classics with only a stately name or a picture that looks older than your great grandma, non-fiction collections with their suave patters, biographies with pictures that tell you exactly the type of light the unsuspecting subject will be cast under. And of […]

Exciting new game ‘Walden’

The Core is delighted to share that game designer Tracy Fullerton is developing a new game, Walden. Thoreau’s Walden is one of the key texts in CC202′s study of Enlightenment and Modernity, and the game simulates the experiment in living made by Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond in 1845-47. Ms. Fullerton was kind enough to […]

Upcoming MFA Courses & Lectures

Throughout the next couple of months, the MFA will be hosting numerous intriguing lectures related to the Museum’s special exhibitions and timely art topics. Here is the description from their site: Speakers include artists and art experts from around the world. Or expand your art horizons with one-day to ten-session offerings designed to complement the […]

Boston’s Role In Contemporary Art

On Boston’s role in the instigation of a new thinking about contemporary art, is an intriguing post by Christopher Shea for the Boston Globe. Here is an extract: New York’s dominance in producing art can’t be denied—there was no Boston Jackson Pollock, and there were significant delays before modern art hit Boston gallery walls. But Boston […]

Seeing Art Through Austen’s Eyes

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s work is an article from the NY Times discussing her ventures into art. Here is an extract: Now, precisely 200 years later, an ambitious online exhibition called “What Jane Saw” will allow modern-day Janeiacs to wander through a meticulous reconstruction of the exhibition and put themselves, if not quite in […]

Salvador Dali Show on View at Hillel

Relating to the Core’s study of the Old and New Testaments, is a fascinating series of lithographs from later in Salvador Dali’s career, titled Aliyah: The Rebirth of Israel, depicting the history of the Jewish people’s return to Israel. Here is an extract from BU Today’s article on the topic: While 250 copies of the Aliyahlithographs were […]

Salvador Dali: Dante’s Purgatorio

Relating to CC102′s study of Dante’s Divine Comedy are illustrations made by Salvador Dali for Purgatorio. Here is a sample: For the full set of images, visit bit.ly/16MKCYi. To view Dali’s illustrations for Inferno, visit bit.ly/10jHp1E, and for Paradiso, visit bit.ly/17vAa9P.

WPA Literature-Related Poster #1

The Core would like to share an interesting source of literature-related art: The Federal Art Project, the visual arts arm of the WPA program from August 29, 1935 until June 30, 1943. The FAP commissioned unemployed artists, including Jackson Pollack, to create public service posters, murals and paintings. The paintings depict various programs and projects sponsored […]

The Future of the Bolshoi Ballet

The Core presents an article from The Atlantic discussing the Bolshoi ballet and its changing state. Here is an extract: History and lingering popular sentiments tether the institution to the state more than any other cultural venue, even if ideologically speaking, neither is much use to the other. Though Putin’s own insistence on machismo makes clear […]