Tagged: article

“Using Sophocles to Treat PTSD”

Prof. Esposito has written to us here at the Core blog to let us know about an extensive and interesting article from the most recent Harper’s Magazine, entitled “Using Sophocles to Treat PTSD”. He writes: I thought you might be interested in it especially since it’s about the performances of Sophocles’ Ajax, Philoctetes, and Women […]

Times Higher Education – “Creative Writing”

The Core presents an interesting feature from Times Higher Education, in which they offer their insight on what the causes, and possible consequences, of the rise of “creative writing” may be. Here is a sample: Despite the speed and apparent smoothness with which creative writing has become incorporated into English departments, or (especially in the US) as a […]

A Review of Eric Hobsbawm’s Posthumous Essays

In his article for the Guardian, Richard Evans discusses the late Eric Hobsbawm’s posthumous collection of essays, and how they reflect the changes in the historian’s views over time. Here is an extract: What Hobsbawm’s Marxism also did, however, was to turn him from a lifelong optimist – while it was still possible for some to think, […]

Core Professor Atema: Nerval’s Lobster

The Core presents an article by Mark Dery, in which he discusses Gérard de Nerval and his infamous “pet” lobster. Dery starts off by quoting Nerval himself: “Why should a lobster be any more ridiculous than a dog? Or a cat, or a gazelle, or a lion, or any other animal that one chooses to take […]

Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass

Relating to CC202′s study of Walt Whitman’s work, here is an extract of the article by Claire Kelley on the poet’s whereabouts while he was writing in 1855: “Whitman-iacs” like NYU Professor Karen Karbiener have paid their respects to the ghost of Walt Whitman by visiting the unassuming white house that stands one story taller than […]

Paula Byrne: ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and politics

The class of CC202 delves into Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Here the Core presents an article looks at that work from another perspective- politics. Here is an excerpt: The Victorians fostered the idea of Austen as the retiring spinster who confined her novels to the small canvas of village life. In more recent times she […]