Tagged: books

A Picture of Human Knowledge

On Friday of the week before Spring Break, Prof. Green was speaking with his classes about the importance of “human knowledge.” What brought that topic to mind? Well, on his way to work, walking down Beacon Street through Coolidge Corner, he’d seen the book pictured above propped up by some unknown person, against a lamp […]

Dogs are not People

In a recent book, How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain, Dr. Gregory Bernes discusses his study (previously featured in a core blog post here) in which MRI brain scans of dogs were explored and showed human like emotions. However, not all dog enthusiasts have wholeheartedly accepted Bernes […]

Fun Fact for Saturday

All of us at the Core office have our little thing that is just sooooo annoying we can’t even stand it. For some of us, it’s the inherent sexism behind a guy holding a door open for a girl; for some it’s using who instead of whom, and for some it’s someone not having read […]

Have you ever lied about reading a book?

Even the most erudite and cultured Core students and faculty have at some point in their lives been placed in a sticky situation where lying about having read a book is the easiest way out. A useful post from The Guardian gives us a study of the top ten books that people have pretended to […]

Zachary Bos on Robert Bringhurst

The Administrative Coordinator of the Core, Zachary Bos, recently wrote a letter to the Boston Finneganers regarding Robert Bringhurst’s books: Dear Friends, and members of the Boston Finneganers: I have a great deal of appreciation for Robert Bringhurst’s books – his interest and valuation of languages, literatures, and the technical means these comes to us; his sense of […]

André Alexis: Why Read?

The essay discusses David Shields’ novel How Literature Saved My Life, and how its ideas truly relate to many aspects of existence. Here is an extract: One of the other things literature does is that it keeps the plates in the air, so to speak. Much thinking, in the humanities, has shifted from the answer-oriented […]

Analects of the Core: Austen on the joy of reading

Relating to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, which is studied this semester by CC 202, is today’s analect: I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I […]

Marginal Note #1: Sassan Tabatabai’s notes on Shakespeare’s King Lear

Core students, faculty, and alumni are invited to contribute to “Marginalia.” This will be a series of images showing how readers relate to their books via underscoring, scribbles, and other forms of mark-up. This first entry in the series comes from Prof. Sassan Tabatabai’s personal copy of King Lear. Click on the image for a […]

Core Readers Series #1

Alumnus Michelle Kwock occupies a summer afternoon reading What’s Wrong With Democracy by Core Humanities lecturer, and chair of the Classics department, Prof. Jay Samons. Would you care to be a featured Core Reader here on the Core blog? Just send us a photo, by attachment to core@bu.edu, showing you reading a Core or Core-related […]

Notes from the May EnCore Book Club

An emphatic discussion was held last week Wednesday the 9th at the EnCore Book Club meeting. Professor Loren J. Samons kindly attended our discussion of his book What’s Wrong With Democracy? From Athenian Practice to American Worship (University of California Press, 2004). We discussed ancient and contemporary politics, the business of government, and the interconnectedness of social, economic, and other issues. To learn more, read on!