Tagged: books

Core Readers Series #1

Alumnus Michelle Kwock occupies a summer afternoon reading What’s Wrong With Democracy by Core Humanities lecturer, and chair of the Classics department, Prof. Jay Samons. Would you care to be a featured Core Reader here on the Core blog? Just send us a photo, by attachment to core@bu.edu, showing you reading a Core or Core-related […]

Notes from the May EnCore Book Club

An emphatic discussion was held last week Wednesday the 9th at the EnCore Book Club meeting. Professor Loren J. Samons kindly attended our discussion of his book What’s Wrong With Democracy? From Athenian Practice to American Worship (University of California Press, 2004). We discussed ancient and contemporary politics, the business of government, and the interconnectedness of social, economic, and other issues. To learn more, read on!

Introducing: The Second Shift

CC 204 students will be happy to see a new addition to this year’s Core Curriculum in the form of a new text. The Second Shift, a short treatise on the evolution of women in the workforce and its anthropological significance in modern society. Author Arlie Hochschild discusses how even though women have steadily integrated into the workforce, they […]

Calliope Project’s Core Book Raffle

Are you a first-year student planning to take CC102 in the spring? Do you want to get all of your books for just $2? If you answered yes, you should know about The Calliope Project’s Core Book raffle! We will be selling $2 tickets this week outside of Core lectures, and in the Core office […]

From Scroll to Screen

From scrolls, to the codex, to e-books, like the Amazon Kindle, the format of the book is changing in our new technological age.  A recent New York Times article describes this ever-changing phenomenon and what we should expect to sacrifice in giving up the good-ole paperback. In the classical world, the scroll was the book […]

New Books in the Core Library!

Prof. Stephanie Nelson has acquired a few books for the Core library. Students and alumni are invited to stop by and check them out: The Invention of Dionysus: an essay on the Birth of Tragedy by James I. Porter Applaus Fur Venus: Die 100 schonsten liebesgedichte der Antike by Niklas Holzberg Generic Enrichment in Virgil […]

The Examined Life is Rarely Worth Living?

The Economist summarizes a new book by James Miller,  Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche, wherein he explores the troubled lives of some of the world’s most famous philosophers.  He proposes that the pursuit of philosophical questions, wrought with uncertainty and self-questioning, has led to similarly unfortunately troubled lives: If one wanted to compile a […]

Professor Abigail Gillman publishes “Viennese Jewish Modernism”

In her recently published new book, Viennese Jewish Modernism, Professor Abigail Gillman — associate professor of Hebrew and German, and instructor in the Core Humanities — takes a novel approach to exploring Jewish Modernism that goes beyond identity as Jewish or non-Jewish. Instead, Prof. Gillman focuses on the works of Sigmund Freud, Hugo Von Hofmannsthal, […]

Michel Houellebecq invokes de Tocqueville

Not long ago, I read de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. I am certain that if you took, on the one hand, an old-order Romantic and, on the other hand, what de Tocqueville predicts will happen to literature with the development of democracy—taking the common man as its subject, having a strong interest in the future, […]

Join us for the EnCore Book Club on October 7, 2010

An invitation from the steering committee members of EnCore, the Association of Core Alumni: Another academic year is upon us, and a new cohort of Boston University freshmen has just begun the amazing journey that is the Core Curriculum. How exciting for them(!), and how exciting for us as we reflect on the beginnings of […]