Tagged: CC101

A Little Platonic Advertising

Summer’s in full swing, and we’ve all settled into our lazy summer habits, which include the constant struggle trying to keep warm for those of us staying in Boston. For those of you missing the Core office, don’t worry, we miss all of you too. To keep your spirits up, we found this wonderful comedic […]

Odysseus to Telemachus

Welcome back after the break! In relation to CC101′s study of The Odyssey is a poem by celebrated Russian poet laureate Joseph Brodsky, titled Odysseus to Telemachus: My dear Telemachus, The Trojan War is over now; I don’t recall who won it. The Greeks, no doubt, for only they would leave so many dead so far […]

Jay Samons & ‘What follows Democracy?’

Prof. Samons gave his famous Trireme lecture last Tuesday – a most exciting highlight of CC101 according to our alumni! Refresh your memory with some select quotes from previous years: “Triremes were built to kill. You can’t have fun on a trireme. You can’t water-ski behind one. You can’t hold an afternoon BBQ on one. […]

Does Math actually exist?

Related to Prof. Roochnik’s CC101 lecture on Plato and maths, is a post from Gizmodo titled ‘Wait a Minute: Does Math actually exist?’. Here is a sample: PBS Idea Channel tackles the subject of whether math really exists or not. It’s a legitimate question because math, unlike physics or chemistry or biology, can’t be seen or smelled […]

Professor Hamill on the Timelessness of Homer’s Trojan War

  Relating to CC101′s study of Greek tragedy, Core humanities Professor Hamill published an article earlier this month for the Theatre Commons’ HowlRound on the Trojan War on Boston’s stages and it’s relation to our understanding of modern warfare. She writes: Homer’s epic, the Iliad, has become the standard-bearer for the theater’s understanding of war […]

Language and Other Abstract Objects: Plato

Language and Other Abstract Objects was published by Rowman & Littlefield in 1981. It discusses the ideas of Plato studied in CC101. Internalization and externalization also explain why, for Plato, poetry corrupts our psyches. Given our psychology, there are two features of poetry which make it an especially potent drug. First, the music and  rhythms […]

Gilgamesh and David Ferry

In his recent work Gilgamesh: An Epic Obsession (http://bit.ly/TDl2BN), Theodore Ziolkowski takes a look at the ways in which the epic has manifested into our literature, art, music, and popular culture. The students of CC101 experienced this through David Ferry, whose translation of Gilgamesh they read this semester. David Ferry has also written: Bewilderment  (http://bit.ly/RwrwnD), which […]

Moses Parting the Red Sea

Earlier this week, Prof. Eckel lectured to the students of CC101 on the Book of Exodus. As an introduction to the topic, he showed the clip above from the 1956 feature film, The Ten Commandments.

MLK: “I have been to the mountaintop”

Prof. Eckel, during his lecture on the Book of Exodus this morning for the students of CC101, showed a clip of Martin Luther King, Jr., speaking on the night before his assassination in 1968.

Gilgamesh unveiling at Harvard

Core students may be interested in attending the installation of the “Gilgamesh” sculpture at Harvard’s Museum of Natural History this Thursday, September 13th starting at 5:30 pm. The unveiling will be accompanied by a reading from translator David Ferry. Visit http://www.geomus.fas.harvard.edu for more information regarding the event.