Tagged: CC102

Daodejing & bright vs. dark

This semester, CC102 has delved into the Daodejing and all the wonderful concepts it illuminates. Andrew Klufas, a student in Professor Nelson’s class, sent in an video of interest: What’s The Brightest Thing in the Universe? It’s creator, Vsauce, makes popular and informative videos on Youtube. Here, we see how Core Science meets Core Humanities: There is […]

The Graduate Student Classics Department Conference

Alright guys, it’s time to get excited about death. Now death is a natural part of life, a part that can overcome even the greatest but can leave the weakest stronger than ever imagined. Gilgamesh taught us that if nothing else. But for those of us who didn’t learn enough from our discussion section, have no […]

The Onion: Tenth circle added to Dante’s Hell

The Onion rarely fails to deliver… this time it is their excellent twist on Dante’s Inferno which has caught the Core’s attention. All those who remember CC102′s Dantean struggles will appreciate this. Here is an extract: CITY OF DIS, NETHER HELL–After nearly four years of construction at an estimated cost of 750 million souls, Corpadverticus, […]

Oscar Wilde’s review of the Zhuangzi

Relating to CC102′s study of Confucius, and Prof. Wiebke Denecke’s lecture on Confucian China, is the Zhuangzi, a compilation of wisdom teachings much like the Dao De Jing. After scrupulous analysis of Herbert A. Giles’s 1889 translation, Oscar Wilde comes to the following conclusion in his review: It is clear that Chuang Tzu is a very dangerous […]

Above the Door

The sign pictured below was posted, by unknown parties, outside the entrance to the CC102 Final Exam in May 2013.

Salvador Dali: Dante’s Purgatorio

Relating to CC102′s study of Dante’s Divine Comedy are illustrations made by Salvador Dali for Purgatorio. Here is a sample: For the full set of images, visit bit.ly/16MKCYi. To view Dali’s illustrations for Inferno, visit bit.ly/10jHp1E, and for Paradiso, visit bit.ly/17vAa9P.

Salvador Dali: Dante’s Inferno

Relating to CC102′s study of Dante’s Divine Comedy are illustrations made by Salvador Dali for Inferno. Here is a sample: For the full set of images, visit bit.ly/14TfLgu. To view Dali’s illustrations for Purgatorio, visit bit.ly/17H3fQT, and for Paradiso, visit bit.ly/17vAa9P.

Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There!

The Core Curriculum offers CC102-related intellectual stickers advocating what Buddha would say to Arjuna: Everyone interested can email core@bu.edu or Tweet to Prof. Eckel @taoofcore, to request their own sticker and the Core will mail it to them!

Applying Confucian Ethics to International Relations

In view of CC102′s study of the Analects of Confucius, the Core presents an interesting discussion of Confucian ethics when applied to international relations. Here is a sample: Chinese ethics is a deontological system that has a continuity spanning a range from personal to public concerns, without differentiation. A good society, a good state, and […]

Spring 2013 Core Mentoring for First-Year Students

What will Nate and Gayle, the Core Mentors, be doing this semester? For students in CC102, they will be holding periodic reviews on books that have proven to be particularly challenging for students in the past. These reviews are entirely optional but highly encouraged. They will provide students with another chance to review the material […]