Tagged: CC201

Vermeer & his photo-realism

Related to CC201′s study of Rembrandt is the mysterious work of Johannes Vermeer, another painter of the Dutch Golden Age. His photo-realism has been a topic of debate – how did he achieve it? Vanity Fair offers some recent speculation. Here is a sample: Despite occasional speculation over the years that an optical device somehow enabled […]

Machiavelli’s notion of truth

Earlier this week we discussed Machiavelli’s potent shock-value. Now, Arts & Letter Daily has linked us to The New Criterion‘s post on Machiavelli’s philosophical musings of truth. The claim is that they are just as important as his political work. ALDaily writes: “I depart from the orders of others.” With that, Machiavelli reconceived both politics and philosophy. […]

Machiavelli: still shocks 5 centuries later

CC201 has started off the semester by dabbling, among other things, in Machiavelli’s The Prince. Many were acquainted with the work from their high school years, and many were not - all admit it remains potent and relevant today. This post for The National Interest highlights the way in which The Prince still shocks today. A sample: […]

Montaigne on Film

A Youtube channel named Montaigne On Film has caught our attention! Their videos take an abstract approach to Montaigne’s ideas, which are studied in CC201 this semester. Check them out below: How our emotions discharge against false objects when lacking real ones Our emotions get carried away beyond us On sadness

Montaigne: The First Blogger

Relating to CC201′s recent study of Montaigne, Shaun Kenney discusses the idea of the 16th century French essayist as being a proto-blogger. Even though his writings came centuries before blogging and the internet, let alone the idea of a computer, it’s easy to see Montaigne’s essays being published through a popular blog on WordPress or […]

Montaigne: What do I know?

Relating to CC201′s study of Montaigne is an article by Liam Julian of The Weekly Standard, discussing the Essays. Here is an extract: Begun in 1572, the Essays is Montaigne’s 20-year examination of his own life, and not the product of that examination, either, but the examination itself. It contains more than a hundred essays and some […]

What Machiavelli Knew

Relating to CC201′s study of Niccolo Machiavelli’s the Prince, is an article discussing his ideas on whether law can supplant politics. Here is an extract: One of the peculiarities of political thought at the present time is that it is fundamentally hostile to politics. Bismarck may have opined that laws are like sausages – it’s best […]

One Of Us: Discussing Descartes & Animal Consciousness

Relating to CC201′s study of The Renaissance is the essay ‘One Of Us’ by John Jeremiah Sullivan on animal consciousness, in which he discusses Descartes’ views on the topic. Here is an extract: Descartes’ term for them [animals] was automata—windup toys, like the Renaissance protorobots he’d seen as a boy in the gardens at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, “hydraulic statues” that […]

Six Degrees of Francis Bacon

This project reassembles the Early Modern social network, interweaving many of the personalities studied in CC201: bit.ly/15YyGnM

The Essay as Reality Television

Adam Kirsch discusses whether or not essays are “extinct” as a form of writing, and references Michel e Montaigne, whose work is studied in CC201. Here is a sample: The essay, traditionally, was defined by its freedom and its empiricism—qualities that it inherited from its modern inventor, Montaigne. “What do I know?” Montaigne asked, and […]