Tagged: CC202

What’s great about Goethe?

That Goethe is being read as part of CC202 speaks to his profound impact on literature. A writer whose works mimicked his life (or perhaps the opposite), Goethe felt a longing, a hiraeth perhaps, for something truehe wanted experience for experiences sake. Yet, can it be recounted when Goethe was last mentioned outside of the […]

Borges! Studied for the first time in CC202

For the first time, CC202 is studying Jorge Luis Borges, and his story The Immortal. Here is a short excerpt from the introduction of our edition, with an epigraph by Francis Bacon: A recent article of interest discusses a stolen first edition of Borges’ first poems. It was supposedly returned to Argentina’s National Library, but there […]

Voltaire & the Republic of Letters

CC202 has just moved on from Candide. Voltaire strikes even the casual reader as a captivating persona, with wit and intelligence. However, Voltaire’s role in the “Republic of Letters” is certainly worth a mention. To escape arrest, Voltaire lived at Cirey for fifteen years. He wrote a steady stream of letters to stay connected with his friends in […]

Exciting new game ‘Walden’

The Core is delighted to share that game designer Tracy Fullerton is developing a new game, Walden. Thoreau’s Walden is one of the key texts in CC202’s study of Enlightenment and Modernity, and the game simulates the experiment in living made by Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond in 1845-47. Ms. Fullerton was kind enough to […]

How to think of the Web

From Prof. Jon Westling‘s syllabus for his discussion section of CC 202 in Spring 2004 The Internet [like fire, money, science, water, and other elemental entities] can be a helpful servant, but it is a bad master. In the disciplines of the humanities and the social sciences, unlike in some scientific disciplines, it is not customary […]

Seeing Art Through Austen’s Eyes

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s work is an article from the NY Times discussing her ventures into art. Here is an extract: Now, precisely 200 years later, an ambitious online exhibition called “What Jane Saw” will allow modern-day Janeiacs to wander through a meticulous reconstruction of the exhibition and put themselves, if not quite in […]

William Blake’s ‘The Tyger’

Relating to CC202’s study of Blake’s work, here is an image from ‘The Tyger’      

The Nietzsche Family Circus

Relating to CC202’s upcoming study of Nietzsche at the end of this semester is this amusing but informative site: bit.ly/10QJV0h Enjoy!

Nabokov & His Literature Class

In his article titled ‘An A from Nabokov’, Edward Jay Epstein recounts his experience from Lit 311 at Cornell University, where he studied many of the works that the Core explores in CC202. Here is an extract: The professor was Vladimir Nabokov, an émigré from tsarist Russia. About six feet tall and balding, he stood, with […]

What did YOU read on spring break?

Prof. Hamill took this photo on the beach in St. John, Virgin Islands, during her vacation there last week.