Tagged: criticism

From the Nation: Criticism in the Twilight

Nicholas Dames at The Nation reviews three books that attempt to vindicate the practice of literary criticism. One of the most salient ways in which all three have done so is by laboring howcriticism opens the sensibilities of its readers to more valuably appreciate works of art that wouldotherwise have been abstruse or mysterious. What, […]

A Review of Christian Wiman’s Spiritual Autobiography

In his review of Christian Wiman’s spiritual autobiography, My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer, Jay Parini discusses Wiman’s emphasis on the importance of faith to a critic. Here is an extract: It strikes me that criticism—systemic reflection on texts, even on life itself—has lost its urgency during the past 30 years or more, […]

Criticism of ‘Jane Austen, Game Theorist’

Relating to CC202’s study of Jane Austen’s work is an article from Slate, in which Adelle Waldman gives her amusing criticism of a recent book that discusses Austen’s insight into human behavior. Here is an extract: Austen, it seems, has something to tell us. And not only us English majors. Mathematicians. Game theorists. Serious thinkers. Even […]

On the new digital culture

Beyond the sheer mental workload, our thoughts have acquired a new orientation. Of the two mental worlds everyone inhabits, the inner and the outer, the latter increasingly rules. The more connected we are, the more we depend on the world outside ourselves to tell us how to think and live. There’s always been a conflict […]

New Books in the Core Library!

Prof. Stephanie Nelson has acquired a few books for the Core library. Students and alumni are invited to stop by and check them out: The Invention of Dionysus: an essay on the Birth of Tragedy by James I. Porter Applaus Fur Venus: Die 100 schonsten liebesgedichte der Antike by Niklas Holzberg Generic Enrichment in Virgil […]

Analects of the Core: Austen on stupid men (and some Austeniana)

Thank Heaven! I am going to-morrow where I shall find a man who has not one agreeable quality, who has neither manner nor sense to recommend him. Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing, after all. – Elizabeth Bennet, in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Volume II, Chapter iv, 151-152 (Penguin Classics edition) * […]