Tagged: history

Postcards to the Core: From London, July 2016

Our latest postcard comes to CAS 119 from the North End — for you see, Prof. Stephanie Nelson had been in London, had visited the National Portrait Gallery there, but didn’t get the chance to find a post box and drop the memento postcard she bought for us into the mail before she had to […]

“… as the world rolls on toward bigger and better nobility.”

It seems folks are always fretting about the juvenile hijinks taking place on college campuses. However, going through some BU archives, we find an opinion expressed in 1931 that the immaturity was more or less over. Has this observation been borne out? You be the judge. From an editorial titled “Growing Pains”, published in a […]

What We Lose if We Lose the Canon

The ease of publishing one’s writing online, in conjunction with the pleasure reading of popular fiction, may have changed our perception of the literary canon, says Arthur Krystal of The Chronicle Review. He fears a loss of appreciation for its greatness as new artists turn out works that will never have the same resonance as, say, a Shakespearean sonnet or a Homerian epic.

What Core prof was on the radio to talk Xmas carols?

Over at SoundCloud, the good folks of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation have posted an audio interview with one of their hosts asking a certain familiar Core personality all about a certain familiar holiday song… can you guess who it was? Can you guess what song? Give up? It’s Professor Hamill! It’s “Jingle Bells”! Minds are […]

Ibn al-Haytham on Scientific Methodology

Egyptian scientist, Ibn al-Haytham (AD 950-1040), is hailed as the father of modern optics and experimental physics. Also, he’s apparently one of the first to make a statement on scientific methodology: The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them, […]

The Graduate Student Classics Department Conference

Alright guys, it’s time to get excited about death. Now death is a natural part of life, a part that can overcome even the greatest but can leave the weakest stronger than ever imagined. Gilgamesh taught us that if nothing else. But for those of us who didn’t learn enough from our discussion section, have no […]

Progressing through Poetry

The late 19th and early 20th century gave birth to some of our world’s favorite poets and poetry, something that could be written off as simple proximity, but we at Core believe what makes these writers so important was not only the still resonating effects of political and societal changes they commented on but also […]

Frank Hurley: Color Photographs of the Antarctic in 1915

Color photography has been around far longer than often assumed. Attempts had been made as early as the 1840s and in the mid 19th century several techniques were developed, although no affordable methods were readily available until the mid 20th century. One early technique was the Paget process, most memorably used by Australian photographer James […]

Historical objectivity

Per the question of objectivity vs subjectivity in the reporting of history, relevant to cc203’s lecture on Thucydides’ “History”, check out this satirical piece by the Onion, titled World War II Documentary Suffused With Anti-Nazi Undertones. (courtesy alumna Jenna Dee)

Fourth of July on the Esplanade

The Core wishes a happy Fourth of July to all students – especially those lucky enough to be there at the Esplanade for the celebration! Kara Baskin of The Boston Globe writes: July Fourth commemorates the Declaration of Independence. It is hard to feel independent when cheek-to-jowl with someone in a foam Statue of Liberty […]