Tagged: Homer

Ian Mckellen reading The Odyssey

Ian Mckellen’s voice is excellent. The Odyssey is excellent. Ian Mckellen’s voice reading the Odyssey is even better! This is essentially Mckellen impersonating Homer himself. Are there any other exciting audiobooks of Core texts you have stumbled upon? Let us know!

Odysseus to Telemachus

Welcome back after the break! In relation to CC101′s study of The Odyssey is a poem by celebrated Russian poet laureate Joseph Brodsky, titled Odysseus to Telemachus: My dear Telemachus, The Trojan War is over now; I don’t recall who won it. The Greeks, no doubt, for only they would leave so many dead so far […]

When a Picture Captures a Thousand Words

Art can make or break a book. Look at book covers: the stately classics with only a stately name or a picture that looks older than your great grandma, non-fiction collections with their suave patters, biographies with pictures that tell you exactly the type of light the unsuspecting subject will be cast under. And of […]

Professor Hamill on the Timelessness of Homer’s Trojan War

  Relating to CC101′s study of Greek tragedy, Core humanities Professor Hamill published an article earlier this month for the Theatre Commons’ HowlRound on the Trojan War on Boston’s stages and it’s relation to our understanding of modern warfare. She writes: Homer’s epic, the Iliad, has become the standard-bearer for the theater’s understanding of war […]

Margaret Atwood’s “The Penelopiad” at BU

The Core would like to bring to students’ attention an excellent performance which they can attend- on Sunday February 24, the CFA Department of Theatre will present Margaret Atwood’s “The Penelopiad,” a play about the women in Homer’s Odyssey. The performance will take place at 2 PM, at the Boston Center for the Arts. It […]

Dana Gioa on Epic

No epic survived the welter of history unless both its language and story were unforgettable. From a plot posterity demands both immediate pleasure and enduring moral significance. An epic narrative must vividly and unforgettably embody the central values of a civilization — be they military valor or spiritual redemption. Only a few poets at a […]

Six Quotes: Esposito on Homer

“Isn’t it amazing that the first major work of western civilization — Gilgamesh — depicts the destruction of a human city?” “Menelaus is about to kill Helen, but (smart lady), she bares her breast to him, and he throws his sword down. Some things never change.” “Calypso’s name means concealment and while Odysseus is with […]

Analects of the Core: Homer on the gods’ attention to Telemakhos

“Reason and heart will give you words, Telemakhos; and a spirit will counsel others. I should say the gods were never indifferent to your life.” – Homer, from The Odyssey Book III, lines 31-33. Translation by Robert Fitzgerald.

On Misreading Homer and Finding the Divine in Coffee

Next month’s issue of the New York Review of Books features Gary Wills’ biting condemnation of the effort of Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly to reconcile modern nihilism in their new book All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age.  The problem is not that the book is […]