Tagged: Jane Austen

Seeing Art Through Austen’s Eyes

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s work is an article from the NY Times discussing her ventures into art. Here is an extract: Now, precisely 200 years later, an ambitious online exhibition called “What Jane Saw” will allow modern-day Janeiacs to wander through a meticulous reconstruction of the exhibition and put themselves, if not quite in […]

Criticism of ‘Jane Austen, Game Theorist’

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s work is an article from Slate, in which Adelle Waldman gives her amusing criticism of a recent book that discusses Austen’s insight into human behavior. Here is an extract: Austen, it seems, has something to tell us. And not only us English majors. Mathematicians. Game theorists. Serious thinkers. Even […]

Jane Austen: ‘Persuasion’ vs ‘Emma’

In view of CC202′s intellectual dabbling in Jane Austen’s works, the Core presents an article that argues Emma is in certain ways better than Persuasion. Here is an extract: Published posthumously, it [Persuasion] has an almost skeletal feel, like an outline in which only the most salient points about each character are noted, as if […]

What did YOU read on spring break?

Prof. Hamill took this photo on the beach in St. John, Virgin Islands, during her vacation there last week.

Ron Rosenbaum on the Jane Austen ‘hype’

Relating to CC202′s study of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, the Core offers an article by Ron Rosenbaum, titled Is Jane Austen Overhyped?- Evaluating her literary merit amid the Anniversary reverence. The subject it deals with is important, and relevant to all classics- how much good does exaggerated celebration their anniversaries really do? Here is a […]

Paula Byrne: ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and politics

The class of CC202 delves into Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Here the Core presents an article looks at that work from another perspective- politics. Here is an excerpt: The Victorians fostered the idea of Austen as the retiring spinster who confined her novels to the small canvas of village life. In more recent times she […]

Analects of the Core: Austen on the joy of reading

Relating to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, which is studied this semester by CC 202, is today’s analect: I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I […]