Tagged: Montaigne

Montaigne on Film

A Youtube channel named Montaigne On Film has caught our attention! Their videos take an abstract approach to Montaigne’s ideas, which are studied in CC201 this semester. Check them out below: How our emotions discharge against false objects when lacking real ones Our emotions get carried away beyond us On sadness

Salvador Dali: Illustrations of Montaigne’s Essays, Alice in Wonderland and the Zodiac

When we think of great artists, unless we are expert scholars of them, we tend to think of their most popular masterpiece(s). The name Van Gogh brings to mind Starry Night, while Da Vinci makes one immediately think of the Mona Lisa. For Salvador Dali it may very well be The Persistance of Memory, or […]

Montaigne: The First Blogger

Relating to CC201′s recent study of Montaigne, Shaun Kenney discusses the idea of the 16th century French essayist as being a proto-blogger. Even though his writings came centuries before blogging and the internet, let alone the idea of a computer, it’s easy to see Montaigne’s essays being published through a popular blog on WordPress or […]

Montaigne: What do I know?

Relating to CC201′s study of Montaigne is an article by Liam Julian of The Weekly Standard, discussing the Essays. Here is an extract: Begun in 1572, the Essays is Montaigne’s 20-year examination of his own life, and not the product of that examination, either, but the examination itself. It contains more than a hundred essays and some […]

The Essay as Reality Television

Adam Kirsch discusses whether or not essays are “extinct” as a form of writing, and references Michel e Montaigne, whose work is studied in CC201. Here is a sample: The essay, traditionally, was defined by its freedom and its empiricism—qualities that it inherited from its modern inventor, Montaigne. “What do I know?” Montaigne asked, and […]

Montaigne On Modern Living and Fulfillment

American Interest Online offers a book review with commentary on How to Live: A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell.  The review offers first insight into the peculiarities of Montaigne’s approach to his writings, and then on happiness itself, providing humanities scholars a cohesive argument on […]