Tagged: poetry

When Humanities and Natural Sciences Meet

It can be strange to think sometimes of the humanities and sciences meeting. A poetic stanza has very little to do with a mathematical equation one would think; not Edna St. Vincent Millay. In this poem, “Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare”, the Father of Geometry can see what poets, those so attuned to […]

e.e. cummings, the fearless

It seems impossible, sometimes, to delight in the new and exciting. Look at early critics’ and the general public’s reaction to most of modernism for instance. Scorned, scandalized, generally rejected (thank god enough liked it to keep it preserved). And the new can be exhausting in whole other ways. Most of us moved towns even […]

Progressing through Poetry

The late 19th and early 20th century gave birth to some of our world’s favorite poets and poetry, something that could be written off as simple proximity, but we at Core believe what makes these writers so important was not only the still resonating effects of political and societal changes they commented on but also […]

Visiting Writers Series: Joseph Campana

The News Report covered Joseph Campana’s campus visit on Friday September 27th as part of the creative writing program’s Visiting Writers Series. Joseph is a Renaissance poet, scholar and critic, and has been a Core instructor!               Joseph Campana is the author of “The Pain of Reformation: Spenser, Vulnerability, and […]

Tabatabai On the Father of Persian Verse

Core lecturer Sassan Tabatabai has released his 2008 book, Father of Songs, as the newly titled Father of Persian Verse. It is an in depth look at the poet Abu ‘Abdollâh’ Jafar ibn Mohammad Rudaki: Abu ‘Abdollâh’ Jafar ibn Mohammad Rudaki (c. 880 CE-941 CE) was a poet to the Samanid court which ruled much […]

Interview: Stuart Kendall On His New Gilgamesh Translation

  Relating to CC101′s study of the Epic of Gilgamesh is an interview by Biblioklept with Stuart Kendall, a former Core professor whose latest translation is a telling of Gilgamesh that casts the ancient epic poem in modernist poetry. Here is a sample from the interview: Biblioklept: Why Gilgamesh? Stuart Kendall: Gilgamesh is the oldest extended tale that […]

Annual Poetry Reading: Poetry’s Distant Voice

The Core presents a “set of two poems, which are the same poem” as phrased by Zachary Bos, one of the respected speakers at the Annual Poetry Reading this year on April 16th. The theme of the reading was “Poetry’s Distant Voice”, and here is Zachary Bos’ contribution: From The Book of Hours I, 36 MacDiarmid, […]

Boston: Forever Changed

Former US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, who teaches here at BU, shares his reaction to the Boston Marathon bombings: Out of town, watching the horror on a screen, in a familiar place on a familiar occasion, I thought first of my daughter, who works at Mass. General, and my daughter-in-law, who was in Copley Square […]

‘In The Waiting Room’ by Laura Sims

In her post for Poetry Foundation, Laura Sims discusses the strange inspiration that waiting rooms can bring, and how they can be “conducive to poetry”. Here is an extract: The speaker of Elizabeth Bishop’s ‘In the Waiting Room’ has a famously crucial moment in a doctor’s office, too. She looks around at all the adults, all the human beings […]

The Economist on Enjambment

The Core presents an article from The Economist, which discusses enjambment’s popularity and origins. Here is an extract: In “The Force of Poetry”, Christopher Ricks, formerly the Oxford Professor of Poetry who is now at Boston University, writes elegantly of the way enjambment can make language seem elastic: Lineation in verse creates units which may […]