Tagged: reading

from In Defense of Literacy

Snug within the book-bricked walls of a University, it may not seem that literacy is under threat. However, there is a great tradition of humanisticcommentators taking on the role of reminder to bid us keep in mind that literacy in its broadest conception is not just about the ability to decipher meaning out of written […]

What We Lose if We Lose the Canon

The ease of publishing one’s writing online, in conjunction with the pleasure reading of popular fiction, may have changed our perception of the literary canon, says Arthur Krystal of The Chronicle Review. He fears a loss of appreciation for its greatness as new artists turn out works that will never have the same resonance as, say, a Shakespearean sonnet or a Homerian epic.

“The Meaning of Human Existence”

  Biologist Edward O. Wilson has spent his life studying evolutionary biology, writing books, and winning Pulitzer prizes, among other things. He is still going strong at 85 years old, and recently published “The Meaning of Human Existence,” a book intended to explain and convince the general public of the scientific theory of evolution. Drawing […]

Yet More Core Books

The Core recently did a survey of syllabi in programs at other schools offering courses that are like Core in method and structure: primary texts, organized chronologically, giving students a working knowledge of the foundational works and ideas of our shared cultural heritage. While many of the books we saw on those other syllabi were […]

David Green on Core and the canon

Prompted by Dean Sapiro’s lecture on Mary Wollstonecraft to question why there are so few women authors in the Core Humanities, Prof. David Green had his CC 202 students this week  momentarily put aside Pride and Prejudice and the question of whether happiness in marriage is a matter of chance to consider the criteria for […]

Have you ever lied about reading a book?

Even the most erudite and cultured Core students and faculty have at some point in their lives been placed in a sticky situation where lying about having read a book is the easiest way out. A useful post from The Guardian gives us a study of the top ten books that people have pretended to […]

Writers’ Reasons For Reading

Here is where these great writers get their zest for reading: “Every man who knows how to read has it in his power to magnify himself, to multiply the ways in which he exists, to make his life full, significant, and interesting.” Aldous Huxley “Reading a book is like re-writing it for yourself. You bring […]

Annual Poetry Reading: Poetry’s Distant Voice

The Core presents a “set of two poems, which are the same poem” as phrased by Zachary Bos, one of the respected speakers at the Annual Poetry Reading this year on April 16th. The theme of the reading was “Poetry’s Distant Voice”, and here is Zachary Bos’ contribution: From The Book of Hours I, 36 MacDiarmid, […]

W. H. Auden’s Syllabus

In this article, Jeva Lange lets us peek into the extremely heavy reading list college students would receive from W.H. Auden for his class, Fate and the Individual in European Literature, as seen above. Compare this to all the Core reading lists combined! http://bit.ly/W8oTLj For the full article, visit http://nydn.us/13aM8q4

Valentine/Lupercalia Poetry Reading & Gallery Talk

The Core encourages students to visit the MFA and join guest lecturer Henry Augustine Tate in a poetry reading and gallery talk on the intriguing topic of Valentine’s Day, and Lupercalia, an ancient festival. The event will take place on Sunday, February 10th, from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm in the Sharf Visitor Center of […]