Tagged: shakespeare

Christopher Marlowe and the Mythology of Shakespeare

Gary Taylor, lead general editor of The New Oxford Shakespeare, departs from the usual collections of Shakespeare’s plays. For the first time, the three Henry VI plays add the name of Elizabethan tragedian and “bad boy of the English Renaissance,” Christopher Marlowe, as co-author alongside the Bard. But that’s not all–fourteen other plays from the […]

From The Weekly Standard: What We Know of Shakespeare from His (Known) Portraits

Blake Seitz at The Weekly Standard reviews Portraits of Shakespeare by Katherine Duncan-Jones, an absorbing study, we are told, by an author who flouts the rule that tells us we cannot judge a book by its cover. Or if we cannot judge Hamlet from its cover, we can at least make a judgment about its […]

From Education Week: Teaching Shakespeare with 21st Century Technology

As much as it helps to attend lectures, heed instruction, and explore themes we have not discovered ourselves but of whose salience we are assured nonetheless, the most enjoyment that Shakespeare has to offer can only be tapped through self-struggle. A kind in which the self not only struggles to develop with the help of […]

Hamlet in a Jordanian refugee camp

Prof. Hamill (who lectured last week in CC 201 on Hamlet, as it happens) brings to our attention this photo essay from The Guardian: Photojournalist Sarah Lee travelled to Jordan with the Globe Theatres touring Hamlet production. Aiming to visit every country in the world to commemorate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeares birth, and the […]

Was Shakespeare a scientist?

  A recent article by Dan Falk of The Telegraph puts forth this important question by highlighting that:  The genius from Stratford-upon-Avon has worn many hats over the years, with imaginative scholars casting him as a closet Catholic, a mainstream Protestant, an ardent capitalist, a Marxist, a misogynist, a feminist, a homosexual, a legal clerk […]

Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Sung

In anticipation of the lecture on Shakespeare’s sonnets by Prof. Ricks next week in CC 201, here are performances of the Bard’s fourteeners, set to music.   No. 29 (Rufus Wainwright)

The Calliope Project Presents: Hamlet Asylum

“…Not to be.” Hamlet, his father now only a memory, makes a final, solemn decision. His life cut short in its prime, because he could not face a new reality. “Who’s there?” Ophelia, a young girl caught off guard in the middle of the night, is pulled into the darkness. Thrown into a terrible nightmare, […]

David Gilmour: Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18

Core classes often explore Shakespeare’s work, and the video above illustrates the inspiration musicians can draw from it. For an article discussing Gilmour’s interpretation, visit bit.ly/XhVBrD

Lowell House Opera’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The official event description, for April 3rd, 5th, and 6th: With this year’s production, Lowell House Opera joins the worldwide festivities celebrating the centennial year of Benjamin Britten, one of the most influential composers of the 20th century and greatest composers in British music history. A master of modern opera, Britten skillfully captures the magical […]

Marginal Note #1: Sassan Tabatabai’s notes on Shakespeare’s King Lear

Core students, faculty, and alumni are invited to contribute to “Marginalia.” This will be a series of images showing how readers relate to their books via underscoring, scribbles, and other forms of mark-up. This first entry in the series comes from Prof. Sassan Tabatabai’s personal copy of King Lear. Click on the image for a […]