Tagged: Thoreau

Exciting new game ‘Walden’

The Core is delighted to share that game designer Tracy Fullerton is developing a new game, Walden. Thoreau’s Walden is one of the key texts in CC202′s study of Enlightenment and Modernity, and the game simulates the experiment in living made by Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond in 1845-47. Ms. Fullerton was kind enough to […]

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on walls built of ruins

The walls that fence our fields, as well as modern Rome, and not less the Parthenon itself, are all built of ruins. – Henry David Thoreau

Photos from Core at Walden

Core took a trip to Walden Pond this past Saturday, April 30th. After stopping for lunch at the famous Concord Cheese Shop, the group took a walk around the pond and pondered Thoreau’s literary and philosophical legacy. It was a fine spring day for it. L-R: Nora Spalholz, Julia Sinitsky, Sarah Schneider, Cara Papakyrikos, Prof. […]

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on the body of the world

Here lies the body of this world, Whose soul alas to hell is hurled. This golden youth long since was past, Its silver manhood went as fast, An iron age drew on at last; ‘Tis vain its character to tell, The several fates which it befell, What year it died, when ’twill arise, We only […]

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on new-born wisdom

I have always been regretting that I was not as wise as the day I was born. – Henry David Thoreau, from “Where I Lived and What I Lived For” in Walden, which book students will be reading this spring in CC202: From the Enlightenment to Modernity.

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on confidence and success

I learned this, at least, by my experiment; that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. – Henry David Thoreau, from the Conclusion to Walden, which book students will be reading this […]

Analects of the Core: Thoreau on being rich

A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone. – Henry David Thoreau, in “Where I Lived and What I Lived For” from Walden, which book students will be reading this spring in CC202: From the Enlightenment to Modernity.