Education

PhD, Theology
Boston University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences,
Division of Religious and Theological Studies, 2012 (expected).

Doctoral Examinations: Core Texts and Motifs of the World Religions; Theory and Method in Religious Studies; Ancient and Medieval Theology (-1600 CE); Modern Theology (1600-1914); Contemporary Theology (1914-present).

Dissertation: “Reason turned into Sense: John Smith on Spiritual Sensation

Committee:  Ray L. Hart (Boston University), Garth W. Green (McGill University), Douglas Hedley (Cambridge University), Boyd T. Coolman (Boston College)

Smith drew on the tradition of Christian speculation on the soul’s spiritual senses and emulated its major figures (e.g., Origen) by combining Neo-Platonic philosophy with an allegiance to centuries of Christian theory and practice. Three central exegetical chapters demonstrate the role played by spiritual sense for (1) theological method and epistemology, (2) spiritual practice, and (3) apologetic defense of religion against modern skeptics in Smith’s Select Discourses (1660). A summary conclusion then brings these three components together to recapitulate the unifying force of Smith’s conception of spiritual sense. It is by means of spiritual sense that the whole of Smith’s philosophical and theological vision coalesces into a single rational account of the world, the human self, and the Divine.

Additional Graduate Studies

Cambridge University, Faculty of Divinity, Visiting Student, 2008 & 2009. Dissertation research at Emmanuel and Queens’ Colleges under the supervision of Sarah Coakley.

Harvard Divinity School, Summer Language Program, Theological German, 2005.

STM, Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics
Boston University School of Theology, May 2003
Qualifying Examination: Theology of Religion(s) & Comparative Theology
Advisor: John H. Berthrong

MA, Theology
Bangor Theological Seminary, May 2001
Thesis: “The Centrality of the Doctrine of Creation in the Theological Anthropology of Paul Tillich and Paramahansa Yogananda”
Advisor: Oscar E. Remick

BA, Psychology
University of Maine, May 1999