Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Interests: Ancient Philosophy, Moral and Political Philosophy, Eighteenth-Century Philosophy,  Philosophy and Literature, Metaphilosophy.

Before coming to Boston University in 1991, Charles Griswold taught at Howard University. He has held visiting appointments at the Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (2004) and Yale University (1996, as Olmsted Visiting Professor). His teaching and research address various themes, figures, and historical periods.

Griswold is author of a number of books and articles (for further details, please see below). His Forgiveness: a Philosophical Exploration was published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press in paperback and hardback. “Author meets critics” panels on the book were held at a 2008 meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division (the exchange is published in Philosophia 38 (2010), and is on-line here), and at a 2oo8 meeting of the American Catholic Philosophical Association (the exchange has been published in the 2008 ACPA Proceedings and is on-line here; see under “free content”). A conference occasioned by the book took place at the University of Oslo in April of 2008. The results, edited by C. Fricke, were published by Routledge in 2011 under the title The Ethics of Forgiveness (see here). For an exchange in Tikkun (March/April, 2008) about the book see here; for a review in the TLS (12.14.07) see here; for a review in the Times Higher Education book section (May 8, 2008), see here; and for a review in the Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (6.19.08), see here. For relevant discussions with the author on various radio shows, see below.

Griswold is co-editor, with David Konstan, of Ancient Forgiveness: Classical, Judaic, and Christian (Cambridge University Press, 2012). This book is a collection of essays by leading scholars on the nature and scope of classical (both Greek and Roman) as well as early Christian and Judaic conceptions of forgiveness (related notions such as mercy, clemency, pardon, excuse, and the like are also discussed).

He is currently writing about Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Smith. Work in progress includes:
- “Narcissisme, amour de soi et critique sociale: Narcisse de Rousseau et sa Préface,” trans. C. Litwin. Forthcoming in Philosophie de Rousseau, ed. B. Bernadi, B. Bachofen, A. Charrak et F. Guénard (Paris: Garnier Classiques).
- “Liberty and Compulsory Civil Religion in Rousseau’s Social Contract,” accepted 12.12.13 for publication by the Journal of the History of Philosophy (conditional acceptance 9.4.13).
- “Exchange and Self-Falsification: J.-J. Rousseau and A. Smith in Dialogue.” (Draft paper, tentative title.) Being presented in various venues, including as a 2013 Marshall Lecture at Boston College.
- “Genealogical Narrative as Critique: Rousseau’s Second Discourse.” (Draft paper, tentative title.) Being presented in various venues, including at the 2013 Workshop on Late Modern Philosophy at Boston University.

Publications (books):

Other publications (partial list):

  • “The Nature and Ethics of Vengeful Anger,” Nomos LIII: “Passions and Emotions,” ed. J. Fleming (NYU Press, 2013), pp. 77-124. (pdf)
  • Review of T. Brudholm’s Resentment’s Virtue: Jean Améry and the Refusal to Forgive, N. Smith’s I was Wrong: the Meanings of Apologies, and L. Radzik’s Making Amends: Atonement in Morality, Law, and Politics; all for the Times Literary Supplement (TLS), Jan. 7, 2011, p. 28. (pdf)
  • “Socrates’ Political Philosophy,” in The Cambridge Companion to Socrates, ed. D. Morrison (Cambridge University Press, 2011), pp. 333-354. (pdf)
  • “Smith and Rousseau in Dialogue: Sympathy, Pitié, Spectatorship and Narrative.” In The Philosophy of Adam Smith: Essays Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of The Theory of Moral Sentiments, ed. V. Brown and S. Fleischacker, vol. 5 of The Adam Smith Review (Routledge, 2010), pp. 59-84. (pdf)
  • “Reading and Writing Plato,” Philosophy and Literature 32 (2008): 205-216. Article review of R. Blondell, The Play of Character in Plato’s Dialogues; K. Corrigan and E. Glazov-Corrigan, Plato’s Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in the Symposium; D. Hyland, Questioning Platonism: Continental Interpretations of Plato; D. Nails, The People of Plato: a Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics. (pdf)
  • “Longing for the Best: Plato on Reconciliation with Imperfection,” Arion 11 (2003): 101-136.
  • “Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry,” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (first published 12/03, substantive revision 1/30/2012), Edward N. Zalta (ed.). On-line here.
  • “Philosophers in the Agora,” Perspectives on Political Science 32 (2003): 203-206. Commentary on M. Lilla’s The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics, with a reply by Lilla.
  • “Comments on Kahn,” in New Perspectives on Plato, Modern and Ancient, ed. J. Annas and C. Rowe (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2002), pp. 129-144. (This commentary on C. Kahn’s “On Platonic Chronology,” included in the same volume, is a discussion of the case for any organization of Plato’s works according to (presumed) dates of their composition.)
  • “Irony in the Platonic Dialogues,” Philosophy and Literature 26 (2002): 84-106. (pdf)
  • “Relying on Your Own Voice: An Unsettled Rivalry of Moral Ideals in Plato’s Protagoras,” Review of Metaphysics 53 (1999): 283-307. (pdf)
  • “E Pluribus Unum? On the Platonic ‘Corpus’,” Ancient Philosophy 19 (1999): 361-397. An exchange about this article between the author and Charles Kahn is published in Ancient Philosophy 20 (2000): 189-197.
  • Review of J. Gray’s Enlightenment’s Wake: Politics and Culture at the Close of the Modern Age, Political Theory 27 (1999): 274-281.
  • “Platonic Liberalism: Self-Perfection as a Foundation of Political Theory,” in Plato and Platonism, ed. J.M. van Ophuijsen (Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 1999), pp. 102-134. Slightly different version published in French as “Le Libéralisme Platonicien: de la Perfection Individuelle comme Fondement d’une Théorie Politique,” in vol. 2 of Contre Platon, ed. M. Dixsaut (Paris: Vrin, 1995), pp. 155-195 (trans. by M. and J. Dixsaut).
  • “Religion and Community: Adam Smith on the Virtues of Liberty,” Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1997): 395-419.
  • “Adam Smith on Friendship and Love,” with D. Den Uyl, Review of Metaphysics 49 (1996): 609-637.
  • “Happiness, Tranquillity, and Philosophy,” Critical Review 10 (1996): 1-32. (pdf)
  • “The Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Washington Mall: Philosophical Thoughts on Political Iconography,” Critical Inquiry 12 (1986): 688-719. (pdf) Reprinted in Critical Issues in Public Art: Content, Context, and Controversy, ed. H. Senie and S. Webster (New York: Harper/Collins, 1992), pp. 71-100; and in Art and the Public Sphere, ed. W. J. T. Mitchell (University of Chicago Press, 1992), pp. 79-112.
  • “Plato’s Metaphilosophy,” in Platonic Investigations, ed. Dominic O’Meara (Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 1985): 1-33. Reprinted with some changes under the title “Plato’s Metaphilosophy: Why Plato Wrote Dialogues,” in Platonic Writings, Platonic Readings, ed. C. Griswold (New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall, 1988), pp. 143-167. (pdf) French translation, with further changes, published as “La naissance et la défense de la raison dialogique chez Platon,” in La naissance de la Raison en Grèce, ed. J.-F. Mattéi (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1990), pp. 359-89 (trans. by B. Boulad and reviewed by A. and J.-F. Mattéi). Also reprinted in Plato: Critical Assessments, ed. N. Smith, vol. 1 (New York: Routledge, 1998): 221-252.

Some occasional pieces:

  • “On Forgiveness,” in “The Stone” series of the New York Times, published on-line on Dec. 26, 2010, and archived here.
  • “Happiness and Cypher’s Choice: is Ignorance Bliss?” in The Matrix and Philosophy, vol. III of a series “Popular Culture and Philosophy,” ed. W.T. Irwin. (Open Court, 2002), pp. 126-137.
  • “Attracting Blacks to Philosophy,” American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 92.1 (1993), pp. 55-59.

In addition, Griswold has written on subjects such as the American Enlightenment, and Jefferson and the problem of slavery. He has also published in such venues as The MonistRevue de Métaphysique et de Morale, Man and World, the Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, and in various edited volumes (including The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith). His work has been translated into French, German, and Italian.

In another register: Griswold discussed the topic of forgiveness on Philosophy Talk (hosted by Stanford philosophers Ken Taylor and John Perry, 2005); it is archived here. For another conversation about forgiveness and related notions with Griswold, on Australian National Radio (2008), see here. In 2009 he appeared on “Why? Philosophical discussions about Everyday Life,” broadcast by North Dakota public radio (archived here), as well as on a show on forgiveness broadcast by Connecticut Public Radio (archived here). In 2014 he was interviewed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for a show on forgiveness in the age of the internet (archived here).

Presentations during the Winter 2009 – Spring 2013 period in various venues including at Oxford University (conference on Adam Smith), the University of Arizona, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, the University of Chicago, Harvard University, the NIH/Georgetown/George Washington Colloquium series, the American Philosophical Association, Boston College (Fitzgibbons Lecture), Brown University, Davidson College, the University of New Hampshire, Vassar College, the University of Bristol (Rousseau Association meeting), the University of Memphis, the University of California, Davis (Sinopoli Lecture), the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France (Colloque international: Philosophie de Rousseau/Rousseau’s Philosophy), the Ohio State University (Mershon Center), and at Tel Aviv University. See also the work in progress mentioned above.

Fellowships and Grants (selected):

  • American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, 2009/10
  • Cullman Center Fellowship (New York Public Library), 2009/10 (declined)
  • Stanford Humanities Center Fellowship, 2004/05
  • National Humanities Center Fellowship, 1989/90, 2009/10 (declined)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 1986/87
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, 1984
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, Director, Seminar for
    Secondary School Teachers, 1985
  • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Fellowship, 8/1989 – 12/1990
  • American Council of Learned Societies Travel Grants, 1987, 1990
  • Earhart Foundation Fellowship Research Grants, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1999, 2010

Teaching (partial list):

  • Spring 1998: contemporary virtue ethics
  • 1999/2000 academic year, team-taught seminar with Glenn Loury, supported by a Templeton Foundation grant. Enlightenment political theory (Sem. I), and its applicability to contemporary social and political issues, especially as relating to race and poverty (Sem. II)
  • Spring 2001: moral realism
  • Spring 2002: Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature
  • Spring 2003 and Spring 2004: seminar on the problem of reconciliation with imperfection (Platonic perfectionism being the point of departure)
  • Spring 2006: sympathy, empathy, and their ethical relevance (readings from Hume, Smith, Rousseau, and contemporary work)
  • Fall 2007: graduate seminar on Rousseau (with contrasting texts from Hume and Smith, as well as relevant contemporary readings on such topics as social contract theory; narrative; and the emotions)
  • Spring 2008: undergraduate seminar on the notion of narrative and its possible usefulness in understanding the idea of the unity of one’s life. Readings from Plato and Aristotle through MacIntyre, Velleman, and Goldie.
  • Fall 2008: graduate seminar on narrative
  • Fall 2010: the emotions (undergraduate seminar)
  • Fall 2011: graduate seminar on the emotions
  • Fall 2012: undergraduate seminar on Rousseau and the Enlightenment (with discussion of Hume, Smith, and numerous contemporary sources)
  • Spring 2013: undergraduate course, “Wealth, Ethics, and Liberty.”
  • Fall 2013: undergraduate course on the emotions
  • Spring 2014: undergraduate seminar on the political problem of religion

Griswold’s graduate level teaching at Boston University has also included courses on various Platonic dialogues. With James Schmidt, he team-taught a two-semester course that focused on the Scottish Enlightenment one semester and on the French and German Enlightenments the next. His undergraduate teaching has included introductory and mid-level courses in ethics, political philosophy, and the history of modern philosophy.

In 1995, he won the Outstanding Teaching Award from the Honors Program of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Griswold’s professional service has included membership on the committees of the Stanford Humanities Center, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities evaluating applications for Fellowships. He serves on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Ancient PhilosophyTheoria, and the International Journal of the Classical Tradition and was a member of the Advisory Council of B.U.’s Institute on Race and Social Division. His service to Boston University has included chairing the philosophy department (term ending August 2007). He has recently served as a member of the University Appointments, Promotion, and Tenure (UAPT) committee (2011-13); as departmental Director of Graduate Studies; and as departmental Director of Fund Raising and Alumni Outreach.

As Department Chair at BU, Griswold helped land over two million dollars in gifts to the department (for some further information, see here). The Karbank Challenge was one part of this effort (see here). Since 1994/95 the Earhart Foundation has invited him to serve as a Sponsor of Earhart Fellows (tuition and stipend awarded by the Earhart Foundation to the sponsored graduate student).