How Does Maggie Rogers Do It?

By Avery Serven

“Cut my hair so I could rock back and forth without thinking of you” might just be one of the most empowering musical lines to come our way. The phrase comes off the song “Alaska” from Maggie Rogers’s debut album, Heard It In A Past Life, which was released on January 18, 2019.

The 24-year-old singer-songwriter has been well-known in the alternative genre since the release of her first EP, Now That the Light Is Fading, in 2017. This EP captures Rogers while she is still a student at NYU, grappling to find her own voice in the sellout world of music. Songs like “Color Song” and “On + Off” show a style of music that is inspired by both folk and pop, with ethereal sounds highlighting her powerful voice.

Heard It In A Past Life moves away from this to signify a new stage in her life. Rogers deviates from her folk/indie roots to produce a record that sounds more like something from Haim or Sylvan Esso. The record seamlessly blends various themes together, such as maturity, heartbreak, and uncertainty. This allows for a personal connection between Rogers and her listeners. The result of this personal connection are songs that can only be described as being “uniquely Rogers.”

An echoing beat calls the listener to the dance floor, establishing Rogers’s distinctive sound in the first track off the album, “Give a Little.” Rogers’s raspy, yet strong, voice admits: “If I was who I was before / Then I’d be waiting at your door / But I cannot confess I am the same.” The upbeat background music, combined with Rogers’s melodic excitement about pursuing a new love, sets a tone for the album that is both nostalgic and hopeful for the future.

Rogers continues to show that she is not afraid of change in “Overnight,” a song about making peace with the fact that people change. “Overnight” is a great example of Rogers’s effortless key changes, which appear in almost all of her songs, giving her a distinctive and genuine sound. The song marks a time of transition in Rogers’s life, with her lyrics emphasizing an acceptance of the unknown.

Rogers’s music is so impressive that the listener should feel honored just to take part in it. This can be felt in “Say It,” a sultry tune about denying your romantic feelings for someone. The song manages to capture the tricky feeling of falling in love despite knowing that it may not be a good idea. A synthesizer beat with a futuristic sound, combined with Rogers’s silky voice sailing through the lyrics, gives the listener the privilege of feeling this emotion at Rogers’s level.

Maggie Rogers is a truly original artist, with both her voice and her words carrying beauty and honesty. She is no longer a young undergrad trying to find her path amidst a whirlwind of emotions. Rogers is mature and reflective now, honing a signature musical style that reveals that she has not necessarily moved past that whirlwind, but rather has come to embrace it.

WMN EMPWRMNT: PHANESIA LAURE PHEREL

By: Melissa Hurtado

Q: What does woman empowerment mean to you?

A: Women empowerment for me includes the liberation of the various intersections of gender from trans gender and nonbinary individuals to the roles of that race and financial strains placed on us.

Q: What does being a woman mean to you?

A: Being a woman is holding all the power in the world but not being sure how to use it.

Q: What do you bring to the table when it comes to women empowerment?

A: I bring to the table a passion to see the world be a better place.

Turquoise

By: Eleni Constantinou

My favorite color is turquoise. I realize this as I allow my feet to dangle off the side of a high cliff overlooking the Mediterranean Sea in Paphos, Cyprus, where the goddess Aphrodite was supposedly born out of the seafoam.

My mind flashes back to a few summers ago, when I had my first camp counselor experience at Agios Nikolaos Tis Stegis Camp in the Troodos Mountains of Cyprus. I remember seeing my cabin for the first time—a group of twelve middle school aged girls, their faces resembling Cyprus’ long history of colonization. I take a moment to reflect how even though these girls may have Venetian, Assyrian, and/or Phoenician ancestry, we all identify as Greek Cypriots. We are all unique patches of that turquoise Mediterranean Sea.

This moment of reflecting upon the mixing of genotypes in Cyprus is contrasted as my mind reels back at the memory of ninth grade French class. My French teacher would continuously dock points off of my exams because even though I answered correctly, I was somehow not good enough. Growing up in Easton, Massachusetts, I was often the darkest skinned student in my class. Some people thought I was Indian, and others guessed Egyptian. I tried explaining to my French teacher that my favorite color was turquoise, that I was just one example of what a Cypriot looked like. I desperately assured her that my mother was pale with green eyes, that Cyprus was actually a White European country, that my olive skin tone was not a threat. But my dark curls and brown eyes did not fool her prejudice.

I then remember my first camp counselor experience again. Irene stuck out. Her mother was Philippino and her father was Cypriot. Her mother left her at a young age. I remember comforting Irene as she cried herself to sleep every night. Every morning, I assured her that she is loved, and that her nightmares would not come true. When Irene felt inadequate to include herself in the company of her peers, I told and retold Irene why my favorite color is turquoise. We are all drops of life in the Mediterranean Sea. No matter our specific shade of turquoise, we are all made of two hydrogens bonded to one oxygen.

I learned everything I taught Irene from my first-hand experiences. When I was in second grade, a boy named Jacob started pretending to sneeze when he came near me, claiming that he was “allergic to Black people.” I sat there stunned and confused, because prior to this experience, I thought I was White. I wish I knew that in a few more years, I would discover that my favorite color is actually turquoise instead of naïve red.

Before my first camp counselor experience ended, Irene entrusted me with a heavy secret. This young twelve-year-old girl has endured years of bullying for the most ridiculous, blood-boiling reasons. Irene has constantly been told by her fellow classmates that she is dirty, an outsider, someone who was not—and will never be—good enough. A few months prior, Irene attempted to commit suicide, but stopped herself when she realized the substantial physical pain caused by stabbing herself in the hand with a sharp kitchen knife. It was in that moment that she considered the emotional pain her grandmother would have to endure seeing her beloved grandchild dead. I have not talked to Irene since that summer, but I hope she remembers why my favorite color is turquoise.

As my mind focuses back to my present task of writing my honors thesis, I take a more analytical approach to my Cypriot identity and heritage. For centuries, populations have interacted and mixed, creating one Cyprus filled with diversity, yet unity.

Confronting the Flaws One Facebook Message at a Time

By: Marie Cantor

Modern media presents many realistic women. Film and television production companies finally understand the significant value of creating three dimensional female characters. Now, the flaws of the female character are central to their behavior, which is quite different from the past where women were depicted either as perfect, or as victims. I like to think that society takes note to these slight changes, and that we are beginning to accept women for their flaws. Women are humans–just like everyone else–and are just as flawed as a B-grade horror film.

On December 19, 2018 I confronted my middle school bully. By 

Me in elementary. Done for an art project in the 8th grade
Me in elementary. Done for an art project in the 8th grade

“confront,” I mean a lengthy message via Facebook, and by “bully,” I mean a girl that loudly insulted me in class that one time in 8th grade English class. This is not the most conventional bully story. We will call the “bully” Susan.

Let me set the scene for you– I am 13 years old, wearing an ill-fitting t-shirt and low waist jeans. I am in an English class that smells as if every adolescent drowned themselves in expired axe body spray. When I stood up, Susan shouted an insult referring to my appearance. Looking back, I can almost justify the remark since I took fashion advice from early 2000s magazines, although it was 2012.

The class grew silent. All eyes were on me. I felt like a street performing monkey who just failed at the trick. From what I remember, I laughed awkwardly in order for it to seem like I was in on the joke.

This might seem insignificant, however this moment stuck with me. Over the years, I grew more curious as to why she did this. We were never enemies, friends, or even frenemies. We barely knew each other. Of course, I could blame the awkward years for fueling her with anger, and she needed an outlet, but I desired an answer.

So, just as any normal person would do, I found her on Facebook and decided to send a message. I attempted to write the best message a person could write in this situation—unaccusatory and understanding. I had immediate senders regret, but there was no turning back.

A couple days pass and I get a response:

Hey love, even though I may not remember, I still want to apologize. That was very rude of me, and I can only imagine how bad my comment made you feel; I am very sorry. I hope you know that you were beautiful and talented, and all that you always believe in yourself and strive for your full potential.

***

That was not the reaction I wanted.

Frankly, I expected too much from the situation. I cannot deny that the message was kind, but it also was safe–safe in the way where the apology seemed disingenuous. I realize that Susan’s message responded to my irrelevant drama from 8 years ago, so I should not be surprised that I did not receive a satisfying answer.

I may never receive my why and that’s perfectly fine; she does not owe me any explanation for something that at the end of the day, did not affect me emotionally.

I think what struck me was the overwhelming positive support. There was no question of my morals; just blind compliments. These are compliments are nice when you see them on a poster in a classroom, but receiving such comments from someone who does not know me feels strange instead of genuine.

The compliments feel strange since I am not a perfect individual who has undeniable talent and beauty. I, the bullied, was also a bully. I had my fair share of rude behavior. And in result of my past, I was also confronted by someone who I used to terrorize 10 years ago. Fortunately, we were able to talk, move past it, and build a strong friendship.

One slogan employed by many feminists is, “Babes Supporting Babes.” To most people, this slogan refers to blind compliments, such as what Susan sent me, which are nice to read, however thPicture1is support is only surface-level. Support does not mean constant reassurance of our beauty and talent. Support is accepting the flaws that are found within us, and grabbing them at the throat. We must embrace our flaws and tread through the constant moments that give the urge to message a bully at 3am. A “babe” supports another “babe” by challenging one another to overcome the challenges that society brings us.

Women are taken advantage of when they are seen as perfect. Women should be seen as flawed individuals who have to prove themselves just as much as the next person. For decades, the image of the “flawless women” was an accuse to see her as inferior. “The
flawless must be dumb.” I want to be challenged and judged on my flaws because I find that to be empowering. We get enough of the superficial from the posters in corny teenage magazines. It’s time for true support.

 

The Missing Ballot – Why Asian American Women Don’t Vote

By: Hanna Xue

Image Description: Clara Chan Lee and Emma Tom Leung become 1st Asian American women to register to vote in 1911. Image via Smithsonian APA
Image Description: Clara Chan Lee and Emma Tom Leung become 1st Asian American women to register to vote in 1911. Image via Smithsonian APA

Since gaining the right to vote 100 years ago, American women have become as politically active as, if not more than, their male counterparts. In the last few decades, women’s voter turnout has slowly but surely matched and then exceed the turnout rate for men – women have comprised a majority of the electorate since 1964[1]. This pattern is reflected in the voting habits of all racial groups – Black, White, and Latina women consistently outvote men in their respective groups – except for one – Asian Americans. Asian American women and men have voted at similar rates for the last two decades[2]. At a first glance, this may indicate parity in the political behavior of Asian men and women. One might assume that if they show up to the polls at roughly the same rate, then they likely possess the same resources and attitudes towards political activity. However, a more comprehensive analysis of factors related to voting reveals that this is hardly the case. So why do Asian American women, who comprise half of the fastest growing minority population in the United States, show up to the polls so slowly? Well, the answer may have something to do with a phenomenon called immigrant socialization.

Immigrant socialization refers to the process by which immigrants learn to reconcile their original cultural identity with the host culture in which they find themselves[3]. Adaptation can be facilitated with increased length of residence and can result in a higher sense of social belonging, which is critical to political participation. A 2018 study by the Journal on Race, Ethnicity, and Politics reports that social belonging precedes political engagement in the sense that an individual must feel integrated into a country before becoming involved in the political system[4]. It should be noted that nearly three quarters of the Asian American population is comprised of immigrants, and Asian Americans are poised to become the largest immigrant community in America by 2055[5]. Thus, immigrant socialization factors affect a majority of the Asian population, and therefore a majority of current or future voters. Moreover, a survey on the identity choices of Asian Americans shows that female Asian Americans are significantly less likely to form a U.S. based identity in comparison to their male counterparts[6]. In other words, Asian American women are more likely than men to self-identify as “Asian” or as part of their specific ethnic group (e.g. Chinese, Indian) than as “Asian American” or “ethnic American” (e.g. Chinese American, Indian American). This subtle preference in word choice could indicate a less salient sense of American identity among Asian American women which, as stated previously, could hamper involvement in the political process. Asian immigrant women may have more trouble forging an American identity than men because, in addition to all of the usual obstacles immigrants face when moving to a new country, women have the additional trouble of confronting sexism. Upon arriving in the United States, many Asian immigrants, regardless of gender, have to adapt to a new linguistic, cultural, and geographic environment to develop that sense of belonging, but unlike Asian immigrant men, women must also navigate a completely new set of sexist and patriarchal oppressions. This unique experience of adaptation means that immigrant Asian women may participate in politics at a completely different rate and with different means than their male counterparts[7]. Even if Asian American women possess the same resources and skills as men, this added layer of gender oppression may make it more difficult for them to adapt an American cultural identity, and therefore participate in politics. This observation holds when ethnicity and education level are accounted for; foreign born Asian women are still less likely to vote than foreign born Asian men that possess an equal level of education[8]. Immigrant socialization is a process that most Asian Americans must go through, but existing systems of oppression create more obstacles for Asian American women to overcome. As a result, their rate of political participation is compromised.

There are a host of other factors that might contribute to the generally low voter turnout rates among Asian American women, however, one cannot deny the impact that poor levels of immigrant socialization have on the group’s voting habits. Existing social, economic, and cultural factors intersect in unique ways to make the process of immigrant socialization, and therefore political participation, even more difficult for Asian women than men. Low voter turnout for Asian American women is not necessarily a result of personal apathy towards politics. Rather, they are the result of systematic barriers to their participation.

[1]“Gender Differences in Voter Turnout,” Center for American Women in Politics, accessed January 9, 2019, http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/resources/genderdiff.pdf.

[2]“Gender Differences,” Center for American Women in Politics, January 9, 2019.

[3]Qingwen Dong, Dean Phillip Gundlach, and John C. Phillips. “The Impact of Bicultural Identity on Immigrant Socialization through Television Viewing in the United States,” Intercultural Communication Studies, 15, no. 2 (2006): 63, https://web.uri.edu/iaics/files/06-Qingwen-Dong-Dean-Phillip-Gundlach-John-C.-Phillips.pdf.

[4]Natalie Masuoka, Hahrie Han, Vivien Leung, and Bang Quan Zheng. “Understanding the Asian American Vote in the 2016 Election,” Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, 3, no. 1 (2018): 190, doi: 10.1017/rep.2017.34.

[5]Gustavo Lopez, Neil G. Ruiz, and Eileen Patten, “Key facts about Asian Americans,” September 8, 2017.

[6]Pei‐te Lien, M. Margaret Conway, and Janelle Wong. “The Contours and Sources of Ethnic Identity Choices Among Asian Americans,” Social Science Quarterly, 84, no. 2 (2003): 471, doi: 10.1111/1540-6237.8402015.

[7]Nadia E. Brown. “Political Participation of Women of Color: An Intersectional Analysis,” Journal of Women, Politics & Policy, 35, no. 4 (2014): 317, doi: 10.1080/1554477X.2014.955406.

[8]Christian Dyogi Phillips and Taeku Lee, “Superficial Equality,” 381.

WMN EMPWRMNT: MARINA GATINHO

By: Melissa Hurtado

Q: What does woman empowerment mean to you?

A: Women supporting other women. Encouraging each other. Lifting each other up. Pure kindness and positivity. It should never be about rising above men. Nor should it be about demeaning those who think differently. Anybody can partake in this movement for as long as they respect those principles.

 

Q: What does being a woman mean to you?

A: Being a woman… being a woman is… I could only think of my mom. She is a woman. My mom did it all on her own with four children; not to prove that she didn’t need a man in her life to help her become as successful as she is today, but to prove to herself that she is capable of getting shit done despite being a single mom. And I guess what I’m trying to say is that… it’s okay for women to be sensitive, empathetic, nurturing, etc…those are all beautiful qualities that should always be embraced (this applies to men as well)—we can still be CEO’s or Presidents because we are just THAT worthy…what, like it’s hard? (Yes, she quoted Elle Woods).

 

Q: What do you bring to the table when it comes to women empowerment?

A: I bring compassion. Compassion, period. We’re all going through the same shit and just trying to be the best versions of ourselves. I think it’s so important for both women and men to understand that concept…and, yeah, like… have some compassion. man, and all else will flow.

Progress within Hollywood: The Top 5 Films with the Best Female Characters of 2018

By: Avery Serven

2018 was a year that will go down in history as a time for change in the film industry. The past year saw countless films that were more intersectional, original, and eye-opening than ever before. The “Time’s Up” campaign, which fights sexual harassment, assault, and inequality, exploded in 2018, bringing a number of important issues to light in Hollywood. As a result, these films were able to provide the industry with storylines, characters, and ideas that were not previously represented; the numbers from the past year speak for themselves.  

In 2018, Black Panther, a Marvel superhero movie with a predominantly Black cast, grossed over $700 million in the United States, making it the highest-grossing movie of 2018 at the domestic box office. Crazy Rich Asians, a rom-com with a predominantly Asian cast, also broke records; the film grossed over $235 million worldwide, making it the highest-grossing romantic comedy in a decade.  

The past year was clearly a pivotal moment for filmmakers. To celebrate this, I chose 5 of my favorite films, in no particular order, from 2018 that feature strong female characters. Each of these films, I believe, was able to contribute to the recent progress that has been made in Hollywood because of their positive and realistic depictions of women. Additionally, all of these movies struck a chord with me because of their candid, genuine, and nuanced approaches to filmmaking in an industry that is predominantly controlled by white men. I highly recommend you watch these films, all of which had me leaving the theater with a sense of hope for the future of female characters on screen.  

  1. Tully

Tully tells the story of Marlo (played by Charlize Theron), a suburban mother who is pregnant with her third child. After the baby is born, Marlo and her husband hire a nighttime nanny named Tully to help Marlo handle the workload that comes with having three kids. Although she is hesitant at first, Marlo soon learns to appreciate Tully and forms a special bond with her. The film, which premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, was not a huge blockbuster, but still earned Theron a Best Actress nomination at the 76th Golden Globe Awards.

Many films often glorify or glamorize the lives of young mothers, but not Tully. This film stood out to me because of its honesty in depicting what life is like for an overworked mother of three children, one of whom is on the spectrum in the movie. Tully does not try to portray Marlo as the “mom of the year,” carting her kids around to soccer games and giving into their demands. Instead, Theron plays Marlo in a more subtle way that captures both the fatigue and frustration that comes with motherhood; her character is strong, yet imperfect. The audience is not supposed to see Marlo as the ideal standard of what it means to be a mom, or even a woman, for that matter. This movie captures reality in a way that many films attempt but ultimately fail to do. I thoroughly enjoyed every moment of Tully, and I think Charlize Theron did a phenomenal job portraying a realistic female character to whom the audience can actually relate to. 

  1. Sorry to Bother You

Sorry to Bother You is an intriguing film about a telemarketer named Cassius and his girlfriend Detroit as they navigate life through an alternate reality version of Oakland, California. The film is anti-establishment and anti-capitalism, as shown in Cassius’s downward spiral after he becomes a money-hungry businessman. The movie is filmed in a unique way, using voices and visuals that are constantly changing in order to capture the different levels of reality that Cassius and Detroit live in. It was definitely different from any other film I saw in 2018, but one of the things that really stood out to me was the character Detroit, played by Tessa Thompson. 

Detroit is both unconventional and determined, wearing distinctive outfits as part of her performance-art aesthetic and speaking out about important issues. She is an artist in the film, criticizing her boyfriend for becoming a materialistic telemarketer. Detroit stands out as a symbol of Black female power amongst a white, capitalistic society, using her art to voice her opinions about everything from race, wealth, and gender. Although she sometimes takes a backseat to the goals and wishes of Cassius, I believe that this dynamic character represents individualism, strength, and rebellion, which is refreshing to see.

  1. Crazy Rich Asians

Crazy Rich Asians broke many records at the box office this past summer, and for good reasons. It is one of the first American movies with an almost entirely Asian cast in 25 years. The film centers on Rachel, an Asian-American woman who accompanies her boyfriend, Nick, to his friend’s wedding in Singapore. The film is filled with scenes of luxury and excessiveness, making it visually appealing and entertaining to watch. Although it was quite formulaic for a rom-com, the movie was still a lot of fun and kept me on the edge of my seat. 

Let me begin by saying that the amount of female characters in this film is abundant. There are so many strong women in this movie to look at in terms of progressive female characters. Although it is a rom-com, there are more substantial storylines related to family, personal values, and loyalty that the female characters have to contend with. With this in mind, Rachel (played by Constance Wu) serves as anything but a two-dimensional leading lady who is only in it to get a man. Yes, she is dating Nick in the movie, but throughout the film, the audience learns more about her personal life, which starts to affect the decisions that she makes in her relationship. The film is a romantic comedy, but it features an ensemble cast of strong women who have their own lives and aspirations that are separate from those of their male counterparts. As far as I’m concerned, that’s pretty groundbreaking for a romance film in 2018. 

  1. Eighth Grade

Eighth Grade is definitely one of my favorites from 2018. Written and directed by comedian Bo Burnham, this film tells the story of thirteen-year-old Kayla, who is finishing her last year of middle school. It shows an honest and, at times, laughable depiction of adolescence in the 21st century. The script is clever and witty, with every one of Kayla’s encounters being both incredibly awkward and relatable; this creates a sense of uncomfortable humor that makes the movie feel like real life.

This film not only stood out to me because of its originality, but also because of the fantastic job that breakout star Elsie Fisher does in playing Kayla, a socially awkward teen that we can all relate to. Kayla is anxious, a little quirky, and doesn’t have all the answers, which was definitely something I could relate to when I was her age. Kayla is only 13 in the film, but she still comes off as mature because her character is so raw and real. In fact, Eighth Grade’s ingenuity reminded me a lot of Tully, as both films show that female characters can be complex and flawedI personally believe that we need more female characters like this on screen for young girls to look up to, and this film does a great job of doing that.

  1. Black Panther

Black Panther undoubtedly changed the landscape for action movies in 2018. Breaking multiple records at both the domestic and foreign box offices, the film became the third highest-grossing film of all time in the United States. Black Panther features an ensemble cast of predominantly Black actors and actresses, as well as an African-American director, Ryan Coogler. The film was not only a huge step for the action movie genre, but also for the film industry as a whole.

 Similar to Crazy Rich Asians, there are so many strong female characters in this movie that I had to choose three, as opposed to just one. The female characters that stand out to me are Shuri (played by Letitia Wright), Okoye (played by Danai Gurira), and Nakia (played by Lupita Nyong’o). All three of these women are badass characters in their own way. Nakia is a peacemaker, executing rescue missions and fighting for those who are oppressed. In the beginning of the film, she makes it clear to T’Challa, the King of Wakanda, that she cannot be his queen because she has to continue pursuing her humanitarian efforts in Africa. Okoye is also a strong character; she is a warrior and serves as the general of the Dora Milaje. She is loyal to T’Challa and defends him throughout the film, appearing in some pretty incredible fight scenes. Shuri is the third strong female character in Black Panther. She stands out because although she is the youngest female character in the film, she is a technical genius, designing the suits and gadgets that are used by the Wakandan army and her brother, T’Challa. At the end of the film, she saves T’Challa’s life and helps her country fight a war. I think this is evidence enough to show that each of the female characters in Black Panther is strong in their own way and fights for what they believe in. I believe that this should be the standard for female characters in action films, and I hope to continue to see progress in this genre.

 

Sources:

https://www.the-numbers.com/movie/Black-Panther#tab=box-office

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3104988/trivia?ref_=tt_ql_2

Congress: A Frat ‘House’ of White Men and White Male Interns

By: Sam Johnson

It was my first day interning on Capitol Hill, and I could not – for the life of me – stop mixing up the names of the male staffers in my office. They read off like roll call at an upper class private high school: Dan, Jake, John, Alex, Tim, the works.  

There was one female staffer in the office, and although disappointed, I was happy to know I at least wouldn’t be the only person with a vagina. I later found out that she was leaving the office in a couple of weeks.

The lack of women in the office came as a shock to me. I’m well aware of the mixed gender ratio of representatives in general, but I (naively) expected better from a small Democratic office.

Two former Capitol Hill staffers, Sara Lonardo and Elizabeth Whitney, apparently also saw the same issue. In July of 2018, they launched the Women’s Congressional Staff Foundation, which awards scholarships to women who might not otherwise be able to intern on the Hill. Both women started as interns and are hoping to get diverse women into offices.

“We’re hoping to open up that world to a broader class, a broader demographic who might take themselves out of the running for a career in public policy,” Whitney said.“As I’ve gotten further along in my career, I have just always shared this passion for helping young women through that very vulnerable time in your life, which is finishing college and starting out in your career,” Whitney said. “We’re really going to be looking for those women who are at that critical path, where this is a make or break opportunity … and they are poised for success if they have that helping hand at that moment.”

Their goal is to fund about 50 young women’s internships each year.

As you might have guessed, the average “hilltern” is not only male – he is a white male.

Picture1

Statistically, those who can afford to work for free for an extended internship tend to be white students able to lean on family finances for a few months.

Congressional interns can expect to spend an estimated $6,000 of their own money for housing, travel and food during an internship in the nation’s capital. Interns on Capitol Hill have shared horror stories on how they made it by, including skipping meals and walking miles in the rain.

The issue of diversity (or lack thereof) in DC interns – or unpaid interns in general – has been drawing criticism nationwide, specifically by those pushing for paid congressional internships. Among supporters is newcomer and democratic icon Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who has recently drawn attention for vowing to pay her interns $15 an hour.

According to Pay Our Interns, 90 percent of House offices do not currently pay their interns at all. In the Senate, about half of Republican offices pay their interns at least a stipend, while Democrats drag behind at 31 percent of offices offering some kind of compensation.

The House and Senate both recently passed spending packages appropriating money specifically for intern pay. For each member’s office, it averages to about $20,000 per year in the House and $50,000 per year in the Senate. However, most members are waiting for new guidelines on using the funds before advertising paid internships.

“I’ll eat your pussy like shrimp fried rice” – how @thefleshlightchronicles navigates fetishism in online dating

By: Hannah Xue

Image via abc.net.au
Image via abc.net.au

As a woman in a monogamous relationship, it’s been some time since I’ve found myself in the online dating scene. But even when I reflect on my short lived days a self-proclaimed Tinder queen, I can fondly recall some of the charming one liners that I used to receive:

“Ni hao ma”

“Hey ling ling”

And my personal favorite, 

“You look like my favorite kpop star before her 2nd nose job”

 Aside from being blatantly unoriginal, these pick up lines all share the quality of using my racial identity as a tool of courtship. It’s grossly offensive, and yet, an experience that many women of color can relate to.

 Fetishism in online dating isn’t a new phenomenon, but Instagram user @thefleshlightchronicles AKA Lillian has been using her unsavory encounters on Tinder to create memes, art, and reclaim WOC sexuality. She juxtaposes the racist, lewd, or just downright distasteful messages she receives from men with captions that contain some of the most incredible clapbacks I’ve ever seen on the internet. But her photos aren’t simply meant to provoke some laughs – she is serious about deconstructing the fetishized dating experiences women face.

Lillian defines fetishization as a combination of sexual prejudice and power, where individuals with greater social and bodily mobility enact fantasies of power over those with less agency. “As dominant figures in our society, White men have the power to dictate the narrative of how our lives go – what our worth is in society.” Historical traumas of war, conquest, slavery and incarceration among non-white peoples form the foundation of racism in our current society, and fetishization replicates those dynamics, albeit on a smaller scale, onto the bodies of WOC today. Sadly, the popularity and accessibility of online dating makes it easier than ever for people to assert their fetishes. The added protection of typing from behind a screen emboldens some offenders and makes them think there can be no physical consequences to their actions.

 But @thefleshlightchronicles proves that no one should assume they are safe from being held accountable for their misogyny. The series of “Ego Death” story highlights on her page publicize reactions to a post she wrote about a man named Ivan, who was well known around his college campus for exclusively dating WOC as a means of gaining faux-woke social capital and then unceremoniously ghosting them.

Images via @thefleshlightchronicles
Images via @thefleshlightchronicles

Many of the replies to the post were from other women who Ivan had used. They shared information about how he lied to and manipulated them, and they thanked Lillian for validating their experiences. And in the end, that’s all @thefleshlightchronicles was originally intended to do – create a safe space for WOC to address racial traumas and reclaim their online space.

Fast Fashion and its Environmental Effects

By: Mylene Oyarzabal

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From H&M to Zara, fast fashion is defined as inexpensive clothing rapidly created as a result of demand for contemporary trends. Targeted primarily to women between the ages of 18 to 24, these clothes are typically categorized as “trendy,” only to be of low quality and never to be seen again following the initial wave of demand. While we’re surrounded by it every day, a majority of Americans are not familiar with the consequences that surround this phenomenon. Although these items tend to be beneficial for the large companies that produce them, the amount of unused and discarded clothing that often results from this has contributed to the pollution of our planet, and is continuing at an alarming rate.      

Since the year 2000, the production of clothing is believed to have doubled in size, and has in turn damaged the state of our planet dramatically. Fast fashion has been at the forefront of this spectacle, encouraging mass market stores to appeal to what is commonly known as “seasonal collections.” Starting with Zara’s bi-weekly collection releases, many brands from Forever 21 to Wet Seal have replicated the practice: redesigning and releasing new clothes at every major location on a weekly or monthly schedule. These enormous shipments and mass productions have in turn taken a toll Picture1on natural resources affecting the environment more than ever before.

And while the amount of clothing produced may seem balanced by the continuing growth of the human population, studies have found that clothing is discarded even quicker than ever before. A majority of Americans own 60% more clothing than they did in the year 2000,Picture1 but only keep hold of them for half as long. The amount of discarded clothes tends to be baffling; on average, 5800 pounds of clothing are burned or landfilled per second. As a result, this amounts to around 182 billion pounds of clothing a year, with the United States alone contributing 26 billion pounds to this obscene number. Taking over 200 years to decompose, our actions are causing clothes to pile up for an indeterminate amount in these landfills and are causing great damage.

The question that we must ask ourselves is how do we resolve this growing issue? An important component to preventing the curse of fast fashion lies in simple inaction. Maintaining our clothes for longer periods of time and refraining from purchasing “hip” new clothing not only saves money, but also helps save the environment. Donating clothing, instead of simply throwing it away, allows clothes to remain in use for longer periods of time and directly maintains them out of landfills. Conscious thinking on our part is essential to breaking the cycle of pollutant clothing, and is becoming a necessity in our consumer-run world.

 

feminist thought and action at boston university