Monday
July 29

Hijab in Christianity

By kdupre

In Christianity, women’s veils are considered obligatory. “If the purpose of hijab is to cover the body, it’s a common practice before Islam, and even before the advent of the religion of Christ, and its effects remain in Europe itself,” says Christian scholar Georgi Zidan. “Christianity not only did not change the Jewish religion’s rules on women’s hijab and continued its strict laws, but, in some cases, extended the step, and raised the need for hijab with greater emphasis, because in the Jewish Shari’a, Family and marriage were considered sacred, and even in Will Durant’s Civilization History, it was stated that “wedding at the age of 20 was compulsory, but from day to day When Christian celibacy, is considered sacred, no doubt will remain for the loss of stimulation and excitement, this school, women to observe complete coverage and avoid cosmetic, called for tighter. “

In this regard, we take a look at the “Gospel”: “… and also give women their clothing, which is not merely goldsmiths and pearls, but dressed in costumes, but not May women argue for religious rigor … ” (Gospel, Paul’s Epistle to Timonus, Second Bottom, Col. 9-15). We also read about women’s dignity and faith: “And so women must be dignified, not indifferent, but alert and in every respect » (Gospel, Prophet Paul the prophet to Timonus, the third volume, verse 11.)

Hijab in the Jewish religion

The propagation of hijab between women of the Jewish people is not something anyone can deny or doubt. Historians have not only spoken about the tradition of hijab among Jewish women, but also to their many extremists and rigors in this regard. In the Book of Hijab in Islam, “although the coverage was not customary in Arabic and Islam was created, it was most prevalent in non-Arab nations.”

In Iran, and among Jews and nations that followed the Jewish thought, the veil was far more severe than what Islam demanded. Among these nations, the faces  (faces and palms) were also covered. Even in some countries, it was not about wearing a woman’s look or a woman’s face, but a way of hiding a woman, making it a harsh habit.

In the Torah, the tent and burqa that women wear with their faces and faces are explicitly mentioned, which indicates the quality of women’s clothing.

Will Durant writes about hijab in Judaism: “If a woman were defying the Jewish law, for example, she would go to the public without a headscarf, or spoke in general, or spoke to anyone with men (non-husband) Or her voice was so loud that, as she spoke in her own house, her neighbors heard and the man was entitled to divorce her without paying a dowry. “

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