Resource Review: NY Times(dot)com

by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

Whenever Laura Judd, MS, RD, CSSD makes a recommendation about a resource for recipes we listen! Laura used to work full time at the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center and was the creator of the ever so popular Healthy Cooking on a Budget course.Laura recommended we take a look at NY Times as a recipe resource for us to include here on this blog.

After doing a lot of exploring on the site, I recommend using this NY Times link for recipes only, because there are a lot of other links to nutritional information that are interesting, but it can be very overwhelming to take it all in at once. The recipes section is pretty straightforward—just scroll down a bit and look at the left side of the screen to get the full list of recipe options. You can also click the drop down options to find something you’re interested in.

They organize their recipes by what type of ingredient you want to center the recipe around (e.g. kale, quinoa, oils, etc.). I really love their selection because they feature recipes for more common ingredients like mushrooms and pasta to more imaginative ingredients like polenta and okra. Each section gives a brief introduction and a list of recipes featuring the selected ingredient.

I looked over three of the most interesting recipes to look over to give you guys a good idea of what they have to offer.

Here’s something pretty and creative to blow your mind:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

Can you tell what it is? It’s a Beet, Rice, and Goat Cheese Burger that I found under the “Beets” category.

I’ll let you look over the whole recipe on your own by clicking the image, but I will say that, other than for its pretty color, I like this recipe because you can make them up to 3 days before you want to eat it. Which is perfect for college students because you can make a batch on a Sunday and eat them over the next couple of days when you don’t have time in the evening to make a full meal.

Here’s the next one that got my attention:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

I Found this one in the “Buckwheat” category. Hot and Sour Soba Salad! Say that 5 times fast.

I like this recipe because as the writer, Martha Shulman (not related to me) says, “I find any combination of noodles and hot-and-sour dressing fairly addictive.” Much like the Beet Burgers, you can cook the noodles up to 3 days ahead as well, so all you have to do the day of is add the dressing. Click the image to find the recipe.

The last recipe I want to feature is this here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

Skillet Collards and Winter Squash with Barely. I chose this one because it’s winter, so why not feature a winter squash?

I give props to this recipe because it uses collard greens which are way underrated in mainstream recipes. Collards are a good way to load up on minerals and nutrients which your body will thank you for.

Keep in mind that all of the recipes on this site may not be Sargent Choice, but with a few simple ingredient swaps most of them could be. Click here to see what makes a recipe Sargent Choice.

 

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