Test Kitchen: Hamantaschen Cookie

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

Greetings blog readers! I’m not Jewish but this week at the Test Kitchen we learned about a Hebrew holiday that is coming up called Purim.  Essentially it’s a silly holiday equivalent to Halloween and one of the delicious traditions is Hamantaschen cookies!  They are shaped like a three-cornered-hat after one that a character from the story, Haman, wore.

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For this recipe, we decided to make two versions of the cookie: one traditional full-blown cookie, and one Sargent Choice-d cookie.  This is for a few reasons.  First of all, Karen has a fantastic recipe for these treats that she makes with her family, and she wanted to share it with all of us.  We also didn’t know how the SC version would do, as baked goods are a little tricky to get to conform to our principles.  In the end, both versions were delicious and we ended up with a ton of yummy cookies.

Some modifications and tips and tricks for when you try out this recipe: add a little orange zest to the dough.  It gives lightness to traditional sugar cookie dough, and makes them really special.  Also when pinching the corners of the “hat” together, make sure you do it pretty tight to make sure the filling doesn’t spill out when cooking.  The dough should also be pretty dry to reduce spreading when cooking.  The recipe called for a strawberry filling, but we also experimented with blueberry and poppy seed filling (the poppy seed was divine, it tastes like honey!).

So readers, enjoy these cookies on Purim or whenever you need a sweet treat.  I know I will be!

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

“Fit For Success”

By Margo Wilson, Journalism Student, Sargent Choice Student Ambassador

Recently Rachel Reynolds, one of our Dietitians at Sargent Choice Nutrition Center, was featured in a BUTV news piece that aired on BUTV 10 and Good Morning BU. Rachel was interviewed by Melissa Adan, who put together the video story. The clip, titled “Fit For Success” was a short piece on how many people make fitness goals in the new year but have trouble keeping them. Reynolds gave some advice on how to keep up with health goals and what kinds of foods to eat to feel more full and provide maximum nutrition for your body

You can watch the video below for further advice on making your fitness goals last throughout the year.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Creating a New Vegan Sargent Choice Offering – BBQ ‘Meatball’ Sub

Corcoran Downey, BU Dietetic Intern

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As the Sargent Choice Dietetic Intern in my food service rotation I was challenged with the task of creating a new Sargent Choice menu item that could be incorporated into the regular cycle menus of the dining halls on Boston University’s Campus. At first I wasn’t quite sure even where to begin. After looking through the cycle menu at Marciano Commons Dining Hall I realized that the offerings at the Vegan station were more limited than other stations. The menu including a large array of Asian inspired dishes, including stir-fry’s, quite a few salads, and a few Mexican inspired dishes. I became inspired to challenge myself, a non-vegan, to create a vegan entre that would bring a little variety to the cycle menu. I enjoy cooking and enjoy trying out new foods so I was up for the challenge!

I begin by thinking about something that I would like to cook for myself; lately I have been enjoying cooking with lentils and the flavors of basic curries. My initial idea was to use eggplant, which isn’t frequently served, and stuff a small Japanese Eggplant with the curried lentil and vegetable mixture. The size of the Japanese eggplants would be perfect for serving while making for a great presentation! However, I was quickly made aware of the current price for a case of Japanese Eggplants and it was way over my budget! Back to the drawing board I went. I began to shift my thinking towards finding a menu item that would not only bring diversity to the Vegan station, but also appeal to all students, vegan, vegetarian, and those without dietary preferences or restrictions. I couldn’t get the idea of BBQ out of my mind; I mean come on, who doesn’t love some good BBQ? So from here I set out to find a way to bring a BBQ menu item to the vegan station. I still wanted to use lentils in my dish given that the vegan cycle menu offerings use primarily tofu and seitan as the main protein source. A lentil oat burger is already offered on the cycle menu, so I didn’t want to just make a lentil based burger, I wanted to go further outside of the box. I took my next idea and ran with it, I would create a BBQ lentil based ‘meatball’ and serve it on a sub roll with coleslaw and a roasted vegetable based side salad!

Coming up with a recipe for my idea proved a little more challenging than I expected; many hour were spent on the internet searching through recipes of vegan ‘meatballs’, ‘meatloaves’, and burgers. I finally settled on two recipes, one that used only lentils and one that used lentils and tofu. The first recipe called for chia seeds as the binder; however chia seeds aren’t a realistic egg replacer for a large-scale dining hall production. Nonetheless, I wanted to mention this because chia seeds could work fantastically as an egg replacer for those of you cooking vegan meals at home!  I spent a good deal of time looking up vegan egg replacers and found a few sources that suggested silken or other tofu. This information pushed me towards the second recipe! With a few slight tweaks I was able to ‘finalize’ the recipe for a test meal!

The preparation on the day of my test meal, as well as the production, went very smoothly. The ‘meatballs’ came together well, as did the coleslaw and the side salad. As I was simmering the ‘meatballs’ in the BBQ sauce over medium heat I began to realize that one or two of my ‘meatballs’ had crumbled as I was stirring; from then on I was very careful to ensure that I didn’t lose anymore! This however did get me thinking that the recipe needed a little tweaking, I had to find a way to get the ‘meatballs’ to hold together better, especially for a large scale lunch service where a server cannot be super careful while stirring a large pot of ‘meatballs’! I was able to successfully make four BBQ ‘meatball’ sandwiches to be tested by myself, Executive Chef Adam Pagan, Jennifer Culbert, RD and Lisa Ferreira, RD. I was a little nervous going into the tasting, would my idea turn out well, would they enjoy the meal, or had something gone terribly wrong? I was so relieved when everyone loved the sandwiches! As a group we did bring up the need for a little more binding and a little more moisture to help the ‘meatballs’ hold up better. Adam and I were able to come up with an easy solution of pureeing half of the cooked lentils with a little bit of vegetable stock in a blender, this would act as more of a binding agent while bringing some moisture to the ‘meatballs’! For those of you making these at home, if you are okay with a more crumbly ‘meatball’, or are only making a few so being careful while mixing in the BBQ sauce isn’t an issue, than this step could easily be left out; however to the sake of a large scale service and providing BU students with the highest quality product we decided to alter the recipe to include pureeing ½ of the cooked lentils, which worked fantastically!

The BBQ lentil ‘meatballs’ were served on a small whole wheat sub roll and topped with Carolina-style vinegar based coleslaw to add crunch and contrasting flavors. A side salad of roasted vegetables and black beans tossed in cilantro lime vinaigrette rounded out the meal!

 

BBQ ‘Meatball’ Sub
Serves: 8
Ingredients:

  • ½ cup yellow onion, finely diced
  •  ½ cup red bell pepper, finely diced
  • 2 ¼ tsp brown sugar
  • 1 cup brown lentils, dry
  • 2 Tbsp low sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 package tofu, extra firm, drained
  • 2 ¼ tsp low sodium soy sauce
  • 1 cup whole grain cornmeal
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • ¾ tsp chili powder
  • ¾ tsp cumin
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup BBQ sauce
  • 8 100% whole wheat sub rolls

Directions:

  1. Cook the lentils by bringing 2 cups of water and lentils to a boil in a pot over high heat, reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 20-25 minutes. Drain any remaining water.
  2. Divide the lentils in half; set half aside and puree the other half with the vegetable broth then set aside.
  3. While lentils cook, chop your pepper and onion into a small dice.
  4. Add olive oil to a pan over medium-high heat and cook the chopped onions and peppers for several minutes until the vegetables begin to soften. Then add the brown sugar to caramelize the mixture.
  5. Place the tofu in a large bowl, and use a potato masher to squish the tofu into a fine consistency – you could also use a hand mixer here or your hands alone!
  6. Add the soy sauce to the tofu and stir to coat.
  7. Add the whole and pureed lentils to the tofu; continue to mash the mixture, breaking up some of the whole lentils.
  8. Add the cooked onion and pepper mixture, whole grain cornmeal, turmeric, chili powder, and cumin to the lentil and tofu mixture, combine well.
  9. Form the mixture into round balls; your ‘meatballs’ should be about an inch in diameter
  10. Form 32 ‘meatballs’, 4 per serving and place on a sheet pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray.
  11. Place the ‘meatballs’ in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. This can be done a head and place in the refrigerator over night as well.
  12. Preheat oven to 425*F and bake the ‘meatballs’ for 20-25 minutes until the outsides are browned.
  13. Remove the ‘meatballs’ from the oven and place in a large pot, over with BBQ sauce and simmer over medium-low heat.
  14. Place 4 ‘meatballs’ on each whole-wheat sub roll with coleslaw. To complete the meal serve this sandwich alongside a side salad.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Resource Review: NY Times(dot)com

by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

Whenever Laura Judd, MS, RD, CSSD makes a recommendation about a resource for recipes we listen! Laura used to work full time at the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center and was the creator of the ever so popular Healthy Cooking on a Budget course.Laura recommended we take a look at NY Times as a recipe resource for us to include here on this blog.

After doing a lot of exploring on the site, I recommend using this NY Times link for recipes only, because there are a lot of other links to nutritional information that are interesting, but it can be very overwhelming to take it all in at once. The recipes section is pretty straightforward—just scroll down a bit and look at the left side of the screen to get the full list of recipe options. You can also click the drop down options to find something you’re interested in.

They organize their recipes by what type of ingredient you want to center the recipe around (e.g. kale, quinoa, oils, etc.). I really love their selection because they feature recipes for more common ingredients like mushrooms and pasta to more imaginative ingredients like polenta and okra. Each section gives a brief introduction and a list of recipes featuring the selected ingredient.

I looked over three of the most interesting recipes to look over to give you guys a good idea of what they have to offer.

Here’s something pretty and creative to blow your mind:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/28/health/nutrition/beet-rice-and-goat-cheese-burgers.html?ref=beets

Can you tell what it is? It’s a Beet, Rice, and Goat Cheese Burger that I found under the “Beets” category.

I’ll let you look over the whole recipe on your own by clicking the image, but I will say that, other than for its pretty color, I like this recipe because you can make them up to 3 days before you want to eat it. Which is perfect for college students because you can make a batch on a Sunday and eat them over the next couple of days when you don’t have time in the evening to make a full meal.

Here’s the next one that got my attention:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/health/nutrition/29recipehealth.html?ref=buckwheat

I Found this one in the “Buckwheat” category. Hot and Sour Soba Salad! Say that 5 times fast.

I like this recipe because as the writer, Martha Shulman (not related to me) says, “I find any combination of noodles and hot-and-sour dressing fairly addictive.” Much like the Beet Burgers, you can cook the noodles up to 3 days ahead as well, so all you have to do the day of is add the dressing. Click the image to find the recipe.

The last recipe I want to feature is this here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/health/nutrition/skillet-collards-and-winter-squash-with-barley-recipes-for-health.html?ref=wintersquash

Skillet Collards and Winter Squash with Barely. I chose this one because it’s winter, so why not feature a winter squash?

I give props to this recipe because it uses collard greens which are way underrated in mainstream recipes. Collards are a good way to load up on minerals and nutrients which your body will thank you for.

Keep in mind that all of the recipes on this site may not be Sargent Choice, but with a few simple ingredient swaps most of them could be. Click here to see what makes a recipe Sargent Choice.

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

 

Smart Shopping Tips

Gina Petracca is a first year graduate student at Boston University in Sargent College’s DPD/MS+DI program.

Smart ShoppingLet’s face it: grocery stores are overwhelming. There is an exorbitant amount of food and an endless number of options. Where do you even begin? And how are you supposed to make healthy decisions with so many treats taunting you at every turn? To start, here are some basic tips to help keep your shopping experience quick and healthy.

Navigate the perimeter. The majority of the food that you actually need is located on the perimeter of the store. Sure, you need to go down a few aisles to get things like canned goods, pasta, rice, bread, cereal, and coffee; but there is no need to snake through the aisles. The “snaking” method exposes you to tons of products that you do not actually need, but that look appealing/necessary. Foods that are in their “whole” or original state (ex: produce, meat) are on the perimeter and just so happen to require refrigeration. Foods that are processed are in the aisles. Stick to the perimeter instead.

#1 Make a list#1 Make a list and stick to it: we’ve all heard it before—make a shopping list if you want to save money, blah blah blah. But seriously, it works; and even more so when you actually stick to the list. When you go shopping unprepared (especially in a large grocery store like Stop & Shop, Whole Foods, or even the Trader Joes in Coolidge Corner) you may feel overwhelmed by all the options and start throwing anything that looks slightly useful/appetizing into your basket. However, if you go into a grocery store with some sort of plan (no matter what the size of the grocery store), you are equipping yourself with purpose and direction. There is less risk of feeling overwhelmed when you are focused on checking off each item from your list.

#2 30 Minutes
#2 Get in and out in 30 minutes: after you have been in a grocery store for 30 minutes, for every additional minute you spend there, you will spend roughly one additional dollar. What does that mean? For example: if you are in the grocery store for 37 minutes, you will spend $7 more than you meant to spend. Think about it—the longer you’re in the store, you start to become hungry, and those end-of-aisle displays start looking really good. Do not linger in the grocery store. Get in, get out, and get on with your life.

#3 Everything is Real Estate#3 Everything is real estate: items on the end-of-aisle displays are not there because they are the best deal, the healthiest choice, or the tastiest selection. Those items are placed at the end of the aisle because some company paid to have that item placed there. Do not be fooled into thinking that the grocery store has your best interests in mind when they put up displays or stock their shelves. There is a meticulous method to the location of every single item on a shelf or in an aisle: companies pay for product placement. Let’s take the cereal aisle as an example: all the colorful cereal boxes (with cartoons and drawings) are located at kids’ eye level, whereas cereal boxes claiming weight loss miracles are located at adults’ eye level. Coincidence? Of course not! Companies pay to have their products placed where their target audience will see the product and therefore be more inclined to buy the product. Think about why you’re buying a product—is it because you actually need it, or because it was conveniently placed in front of you and now you think that you need it.

#4 Never Shop Hungry#4 Never shop hungry: you know how it works—you go into the store starving and all of a sudden you must have that bag of chips, box of cookies, pint of ice cream, and every other snack food. Prevent these impulse purchases instigated by your grumbling tummy. Make sure you eat something—anything—before you go grocery shopping. And if you absolutely don’t have time to eat a snack before you enter the store? Then go into the grocery store, grab a banana, apple, bag of carrots, or granola bar, buy it, then eat it as you shop. Your stomach will stop making noises and you will be able to focus on the foods you actually need to buy—not the foods your stomach momentarily craves.

Shopping smartly takes practice. Start with small changes—like making a list for the first time or making a bag of trail mix to eat before you go into the store. Eventually you’ll be able to walk into a store and fill your basket with delicious, nutritious, and intentional choices. It is important to make healthy choices about the food you eat, but those healthy decisions don’t start in the kitchen—they start when you are in a grocery store shopping for food.

(Original images courtesy of creative commons, recreated and edited by Megan Smith)

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Dim Sum

By Stephanie Smith, Nutrition student with Journalism focus

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

This week’s test kitchen was dedicated to Asian cuisine and culture: Dim Sum was on the menu. To be honest, I wasn’t all to familiar with what Dim Sum really was, before the test kitchen. I had gone to a restaurant in Chinatown for Dim Sum one time and really enjoyed it. The waiters and waitresses pushed carts around the crowded restaurant and as they passed by you would pick which dishes you wanted. It was an interesting experience, but I didn’t understand what Dim Sum really meant.

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When I was told we’d be making Dim Sum, I was pretty confused.

 

To me Dim Sum was more of an experience than a meal–one where people wheeled carts around for you to choose the food you wanted. Were we going to be making several different Chinese dishes all in one night?

I quickly realized that Dim Sum is actually a style of Cantonese food prepared as small plates or finger food-type dishes. That sure cleared things up. So we were gonna be making a small dish at the test kitchen. We’d be making pot stickers.

Pot stickers, or dumplings as they are often referred to as, originated in China and have since been adopted by many Asian cuisines, each made with different ingredients and different preparation methods. Pot stickers are usually stuffed with a meat filling, or often times with vegetables. At the test kitchen, we decided to go for vegetarian pot stickers, to be sure that everybody was able to enjoy the dish.

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There are also different preparation methods used to make pot stickers: boiling, steaming, or frying. We steamed the pot stickers using traditional steamer baskets over a pot of boiling water.

Karen and many of the test kitchen veterans had made this recipe before, so they knew it was going to taste great. But they also had quite a few recommendations on ways to make changes and fix things.

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We changed a lot to this recipe, making it even simpler to make and easier to find and buy ingredients. Our first initial change was to make them without the rice. Karen and students agreed that the rice was just not necessary. As far as the other ingredients, we added only the vegetables and sesame oil. We combined the spinach, mushrooms, water chestnuts, ginger, garlic, and oil. We left out the cornstarch and eggs, though we were a bit weary about how everything would stay together without them, but we gave it a shot. And they turned out great!

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Karen also had some leftover frozen butternut squash from last week’s test kitchen, so we used that too and added some butternut squash to a few of the pot stickers. Those were a hit, too!

All in all, everyone loved the pot stickers and they were so simple to make since we reduced the number of ingredients. They were light and had a great balance of texture between the water chestnuts and the spinach and mushroom.

Pot stickers are traditionally dipped in soy sauce, which is what we did. But we did find that if you don’t dip into soy sauce, they lacked flavor and could have used a pinch of salt. It’s important to remember that soy sauce is high in sodium, so you wouldn’t need to add any additional salt if you were planning on dipping in soy sauce.

 

Sargent Choice Spinach Pot Stickers
Yield: 30 pot stickers
Ingredients
1 cup boiling water
1 (8 ounce) package dried shitake mushrooms
½ cup cooked brown, long-grain rice
1/3 cup finely chopped canned water chestnuts
1 tablespoon minced peeled gingerroot
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 (10 ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed, drained, and squeezed dry
1 garlic clove
Optional: ½ cup cooked brown, long-grain rice; 1 tablespoon cornstarch; 1 egg white

30 wonton wrappers
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 cup water, divided

Directions
1. Combine boiling water and mushrooms in a bowl; cover and let stand 30 minutes. Drain; discard stems, and mince caps.
2. Combine mushroom caps, water chestnuts, cornstarch, gingerroot, sesame oil, spinach, egg white, and garlic. Stir well.
3. Spoon 1 tablespoon of filling mixture into center of each wrapper.
4. Moisten edges of wrapper with water, and bring 2 opposite corners to center and seal. Bring other two corners to center and seal. Pinch 4 edges together firmly to seal. Place pot stickers on a large baking sheet sprinkled with cornstarch. Cover loosely with a towel to keep them from drying out.

Nutrition Facts:
Per pot sticker

Calories: 60; Fat: 1 g; Saturated Fat: 0 g; Protein: 2 g; Carbohydrate: 11 g; Fiber: 1 g

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Healthy Cooking on a Budget Covers: Food Safety

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

Did the class Healthy Cooking on a Budget fill up before you got a chance to register? Well have no fears! I’m here to give you the inside scoop along with a delicious SCNC recipe!

The SCNC recognizes that eating well on a budget, especially a student’s budget, can be quite challenging. Each week Lauren Ferraro MS, RD teaches BU students how to stretch their dollar and get proper nutrition at the same time.

Screenshot 2014-02-20 13.45.23

In addition to teaching students more about nutrition and how to prepare foods, one of the most important topics covered in Healthy Cooking on a Budget is food safety. While cooking, Lauren discussed the importance of proper meat handling.

Follow these tips to keep your food safe and stomach happy.

How should I defrost frozen meat?
Never thaw meat by leaving it on the counter or submerging it in water. Thaw meat in the microwave or in the refrigerator to avoid bacterial growth.

What is the safest way to store meat?
Place meat on the bottom of your refrigerator. Meat juices can look through packaging and contaminate food products down below.

How should I avoid cross contamination in my kitchen?
Designate different cutting boards for meat and vegetables. Also, disinfect the entire counter top or table you are working on.  Microscopic amounts of meat juices can escape or splatter during preparation without your knowledge.

Important Numbers to Remember

40- Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees F or less to inhibit bacterial growth and slow food spoilage.

165- Heat leftovers to 165 degrees F before consumption. If you do not remember when you made your leftovers, THROW THEM AWAY!

2- Do not let perishable foods and meat sit out for more than 2 hours before refrigeration.

20- Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap under warm water before, after and during cooking.

Adapted from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=10948 – .ULL2uo5EDRo

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Winter Curry

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

2014-02-12 20.52.56

 Greetings and hello from the Test Kitchen blog readers!  This week we continued our cultural theme, and brought you a taste of India.  It was truly exciting at the TK, as we not only were cooking an Indian dish but we also had a presenter to talk about the Occupational Therapy summer trip to India that the OT students can take.  While she discussed the history and culture of India, a few of us got busy and cooked this delicious Winter Curry recipe.

Now when you look at this recipe, don’t be intimidated.  The reason it looks so long is because we opted not to use a “curry spice” blend that you can buy in stores and instead we blended up our own!  The result was a complex and flavorful curry, but if you don’t have all of the spices in your cabinet then using a jar of “curry” spice should be alright.

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Since we bought all the spices (which can be quite pricey actually) we decided to use some cost saving measures elsewhere.  We used all frozen vegetables! Not only was this super convenient (raise your hand if you like peeling and dicing a butternut squash…) it was just as nutritious as using fresh vegetables.  Yes, you heard me right: frozen vegetables are just as good for you as fresh!  Because the veggies were so cold we ended up cooking it a little longer than the recipe called for, but besides that there was no difference in the recipe.  I encourage all of you to try this fun recipe next time you want to cook something a little exotic.

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Sargent Choice Winter Curry
Recipe adapted from Moosewood Restaurants Favorites
Yield: 8 servings

 Ingredients
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
2 cups chopped onion
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon peeled and grated fresh ginger
2 teaspoons ground cumin seeds
2 teaspoons ground coriander seeds
½ teaspoons ground cardamom seeds
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground fennel seeds
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes or ¼ teaspoon cayenne
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
5 cups peeled and cubed butternut squash, ¾ -inch pieces
6 cups cauliflower florets
1 cup water
1 cup unsweetened light coconut milk
1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
1 to 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 cups frozen green peas

Serve the curry over brown rice, with a dollop of plain non-fat Greek yogurt on top. 

Directions

  1. In a large pot on medium heat, warm the oil.  Add the mustard seeds and when they begin to pop, add the onions, garlic, salt, and ginger and stir well. Cover and cook on low heat for 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the spices and continue to cook, covered, until the onions are very soft, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add the squash and stir well. Cover and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add the cauliflower and stir well. Stir in the water and coconut milk and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered for about 10 minutes.
  6. Add the tomatoes and simmer until the vegetables are tender. Add peas; cook al dente.
  • Tip: Indian Curry powder is a blend of 5 spices: mustard seed, coriander, cumin, turmeric, and red chili powder. The additional spices listed above will add to the complexity of the dish, but a couple can be eliminated if you don’t have all of them on hand
Nutrition per serving
Calories 370
Fat 14 g
Saturated Fat 3.5 g
Protein 14 g
Carbohydrate 48 g
Fiber 8 g
Sodium 380 mg

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

 

Come si dice “cookies?” Biscotti!

Test Kitchen Post by Stephanie Smith

This week’s Test Kitchen was dedicated to Italy. Being Italian and having about six years of high school Italian language classes under my belt–meaning I know how to say hello and goodbye—I was pretty excited to make biscotti this week! I’ve never made biscotti myself, but I’ve always drooled over the fresh-baked varieties that would show up on our holiday dessert tables baked by all of the women in my family.

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The first biscotti is said to come from the Tuscan town of Prato, during the eighteenth century. Boy, am I glad they’ve lasted long enough to still be part of the Italian culture! Though biscotti were originally unique to Italy, the recipe has since spread throughout Europe, and the cookie has been adapted to take on the flavors from many different European areas.

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Anytime I come to the test kitchen and there’s a dessert to be served, I get so excited—nothing’s better than a healthy dessert! This biscotti recipe was adapted from King Arthur Flour (who knew a legendary British leader would know a thing or two about biscotti!). This recipe is for mini biscotti, which means that not only should you yield about 66 biscotti out of one batch, but it also means that you can eat about four biscotti costing you only 160 calories.

Interestingly enough, the word “biscotti” actually translates to “twice baked.” And you guessed it: these cookies are twice baked, which gives them their hard and crunchy texture. So, you may want to save this recipe for a day when you’ve got a little extra time to tend to the oven, since the total time preparing and baking is about 1 hour and 30 minutes.

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One thing we noticed while baking was that the yield didn’t quite reach 66 per
batch. We doubled the batch, hoping for about 120, but we probably only got
about 90 mini biscotti. Keep in mind that the number of cookies you get out of your batch all depends on how you cut them.

Overall, this recipe got a big thumbs up! We all enjoyed ‘em, polished the plate
clean, and everybody went to grab a bag to bring home. I can’t wait to make these
at home to impress my family soon!

P.S. The title of this post translates to: “How do you say “cookies?” A nice phrase to know for the next time you’re in Italy looking for the sweets.

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Ingredients:

6 tablespoons butter
2/3 cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 large eggs
1 ¾ cups white whole wheat flour
½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats*
½ cup chopped nuts (optional)
3 tablespoons cinnamon-sugar for dusting (1/4 cup sugar mixed with 1 T cinnamon)
*for smoother texture, can pulverize oats in food processor if desired

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Lightly grease (or line with parchment) a large cookie sheet.
2. In a medium-sized bowl, beat together the butter, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, and vanilla until smooth.
3. Add the eggs and beat until the mixture is well combined. It may look a bit coagulated, but that’s okay.
4. Add the flour and oats, mixing to combine.
5. Stir in nuts if using.
6. Divide the dough into four equal pieces, placing them on the prepared baking sheet.
7. Shape each piece into a rough log about 10” to 11” long, placing the logs crosswise on the sheet, and spacing them about 2”       apart. Using damp hands, flatten and smooth the logs until they’re about ¾” thick, and about 1 ¼” wide.
8. Spritz the top of each log with water, and sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar.
9. Bake the logs for 23 to 25 minutes, until they’re beginning to brown around the bottom edges.
10. Remove them from the oven, and allow them to cool right on the pan for about 10 minutes. Spritz  with water, sprinkle with more cinnamon-sugar, and let them cool for another 15 to 20 minutes. While the logs are cooling, reduce the oven temperature to 325˚F.
11. Cut the logs crosswise into ½” to ¾” slices, using a sharp chef’s knife.
12. Place the biscotti back on the baking sheet, spacing them close together without touching.
13. Bake the biscotti for 25 minutes, until their cut edges are a light golden brown. Remove them from the oven, and cool on the pan.

Nutrition Facts:
Serving size: 4 biscotti
Calories: 160
Fat: 5 g
Saturated Fat: 3 g
Protein: 4 g
Carbohydrates: 24 g
Fiber: 1 g

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Test Kitchen: Tapas Night

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and have board game competitions.

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Hola readers! Our latest installment of Karen Jacob’s Test Kitchen brings flavors from sunny Spain.  We made and tested three delicious tapas recipes, each with their own nutritious benefits.  For those who don’t know, tapas is a style of Spanish cuisine where many small plates are served and shared instead of one main dish per person.  This style of eating means you can get a lot of variety of food without feeling stuffed to the brim.

Our first recipe that we made was Patatas Bravas (“fierce potatoes”).  These were a cinch to make, but did take a little bit of time in the oven so plan ahead.  One thing to keep in mind is that we leave the skins on the potatoes.  This does two things: first it gives a little bit more texture to the dish, and second it means there is more nutritious bits left in the tots.  But make sure to rinse them well!

  The next dish we made was Spicy Roasted Chickpeas.  Chickpeas (also    known as garbanzo beans) are a great source of vegetarian protein and are extremely versatile.  The    masala spice isn’t for everyone though, so smell it before you decide to cook with it to make sure you  like it.

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  Last we reinvented the way we eat Spinach and Artichoke Dip.  By using light mayonnaise and less    cheese, the fat and sodium was cut way down but the flavor remained.  Frozen spinach and canned  artichoke hearts means this recipe is a snap to pull together.  The testers noticed that the recipe didn’t  brown as much on top as traditional S&A dip, but the flavor was still spot on.  Try this for your next  game day, or to make any party special.

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You’ll notice that each of the three tapas dishes we made focus on a different food group: carbohydrates (potatoes), protein (chickpeas), and vegetables (spinach and artichokes).  This is on purpose!  A well-balanced meal will have each food group represented in it, and the proportion should weigh heavily toward fruits and vegetables.  This rule also applies to snacks, so when snacking make sure to have carbs, protein, and a veggie or fruit.

So until next time readers, adios!

Recipes:

Sargent Choice Spinach Artichoke Dip      

Yield: 12 tapas servings
Ingredients:
1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach
¾ cup low-fat mayonnaise
½ cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated
1 can or jar 14-ounce artichoke hearts, rinsed, drained, and chopped
2 scallions, finely chopped
½ teaspoon Kosher salt

Directions:
1.  Preheat oven to 350˚F.
2.  Microwave the frozen spinach according to package directions. Drain all water and set aside.
3. In a medium bowl, mix together the mayonnaise and cheese. Stir in the artichoke hearts, scallions, salt, and spinach. Mix thoroughly.
4.  Spoon the mixture into a small casserole dish and bake for 25 minutes, or until hot. Serve with raw vegetables (baby carrots, celery etc.) and whole grain pita torn into bite sized pieces for dipping.

1 serving
Calories 49
Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0.5 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 5 g
Fiber 1 g

Recipe from Joy Bauer, Registered Dietitian.

 

Sargent Choice Patatas Bravas (“fierce potatoes”)
Yield: 12 tapas servings
Ingredients:
3 lbs red potatoes, cut into 1-inch thick wedges
6 T olive oil, divided
6 tsp. minced garlic divided
1.5 tsp hot smoked paprika, or more to taste
1.5 cups canned crushed tomatoes

 Directions:
1.  Preheat oven to 400˚
2.  Toss potatoes with 4 T oil on large baking sheet. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and pepper; cover tightly with foil and roast 20 minutes.
3. Remove foil, and continue roasting 12 minutes, or until potatoes are golden on bottom.
4.  Carefully turn potatoes, and roast 8 minutes more, or until browned.
5.  Sprinkle 2 teaspoons garlic over potatoes, and transfer to serving dish.
6.  Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 T oil in small saucepan over medium heat.  Add remaining 4 teaspoons garlic, and sauté 30 seconds, or until just fragrant.  Add paprika, sauté 10 seconds, then stir in tomatoes. Simmer 10 minutes.
7.  Spoon the sauce over the potatoes, or serve in a bowl along with toothpicks for dunking the potato wedges.

1 serving
Calories 160
Fat 7 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 21 g
Fiber 3 g

Recipe adapted from Vegetarian Times.

 

Sargent Choice Spicy Roasted Chickpeas
Yield: 8 tapas servings

Ingredients:
1 15-ounce chickpeas, canned
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp Kosher salt
2 tsp garam masala spice (or similar spice)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Pour the chickpeas into a colander and drain and rinse well under water. Pat dry.
  3. Toss the chickpeas with the olive oil and spread out on a large cookie sheet.
  4. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until brown and crispy.
  5. Turn and stir every ten minutes to prevent burning.
  6. Take out and toss to taste with salt and spices.
  7. Let cool completely before serving.
1 serving
Calories 70
Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 10 g
Fiber 3 g

 

 

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Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website