Healthy Cooking on a Budget Covers: Food Safety

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

Did the class Healthy Cooking on a Budget fill up before you got a chance to register? Well have no fears! I’m here to give you the inside scoop along with a delicious SCNC recipe!

The SCNC recognizes that eating well on a budget, especially a student’s budget, can be quite challenging. Each week Lauren Ferraro MS, RD teaches BU students how to stretch their dollar and get proper nutrition at the same time.

Screenshot 2014-02-20 13.45.23

In addition to teaching students more about nutrition and how to prepare foods, one of the most important topics covered in Healthy Cooking on a Budget is food safety. While cooking, Lauren discussed the importance of proper meat handling.

Follow these tips to keep your food safe and stomach happy.

How should I defrost frozen meat?
Never thaw meat by leaving it on the counter or submerging it in water. Thaw meat in the microwave or in the refrigerator to avoid bacterial growth.

What is the safest way to store meat?
Place meat on the bottom of your refrigerator. Meat juices can look through packaging and contaminate food products down below.

How should I avoid cross contamination in my kitchen?
Designate different cutting boards for meat and vegetables. Also, disinfect the entire counter top or table you are working on.  Microscopic amounts of meat juices can escape or splatter during preparation without your knowledge.

Important Numbers to Remember

40- Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees F or less to inhibit bacterial growth and slow food spoilage.

165- Heat leftovers to 165 degrees F before consumption. If you do not remember when you made your leftovers, THROW THEM AWAY!

2- Do not let perishable foods and meat sit out for more than 2 hours before refrigeration.

20- Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap under warm water before, after and during cooking.

Adapted from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=10948 – .ULL2uo5EDRo

 

Tweet

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Winter Curry

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

2014-02-12 20.52.56

 Greetings and hello from the Test Kitchen blog readers!  This week we continued our cultural theme, and brought you a taste of India.  It was truly exciting at the TK, as we not only were cooking an Indian dish but we also had a presenter to talk about the Occupational Therapy summer trip to India that the OT students can take.  While she discussed the history and culture of India, a few of us got busy and cooked this delicious Winter Curry recipe.

Now when you look at this recipe, don’t be intimidated.  The reason it looks so long is because we opted not to use a “curry spice” blend that you can buy in stores and instead we blended up our own!  The result was a complex and flavorful curry, but if you don’t have all of the spices in your cabinet then using a jar of “curry” spice should be alright.

2014-02-12 20.29.57

2014-02-12 21.37.25

Since we bought all the spices (which can be quite pricey actually) we decided to use some cost saving measures elsewhere.  We used all frozen vegetables! Not only was this super convenient (raise your hand if you like peeling and dicing a butternut squash…) it was just as nutritious as using fresh vegetables.  Yes, you heard me right: frozen vegetables are just as good for you as fresh!  Because the veggies were so cold we ended up cooking it a little longer than the recipe called for, but besides that there was no difference in the recipe.  I encourage all of you to try this fun recipe next time you want to cook something a little exotic.

2014-02-12 21.25.15

 

Sargent Choice Winter Curry
Recipe adapted from Moosewood Restaurants Favorites
Yield: 8 servings

 Ingredients
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
2 cups chopped onion
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon peeled and grated fresh ginger
2 teaspoons ground cumin seeds
2 teaspoons ground coriander seeds
½ teaspoons ground cardamom seeds
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground fennel seeds
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes or ¼ teaspoon cayenne
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
5 cups peeled and cubed butternut squash, ¾ -inch pieces
6 cups cauliflower florets
1 cup water
1 cup unsweetened light coconut milk
1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
1 to 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 cups frozen green peas

Serve the curry over brown rice, with a dollop of plain non-fat Greek yogurt on top. 

Directions

  1. In a large pot on medium heat, warm the oil.  Add the mustard seeds and when they begin to pop, add the onions, garlic, salt, and ginger and stir well. Cover and cook on low heat for 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the spices and continue to cook, covered, until the onions are very soft, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add the squash and stir well. Cover and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add the cauliflower and stir well. Stir in the water and coconut milk and bring to a boil.
  5. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered for about 10 minutes.
  6. Add the tomatoes and simmer until the vegetables are tender. Add peas; cook al dente.
  • Tip: Indian Curry powder is a blend of 5 spices: mustard seed, coriander, cumin, turmeric, and red chili powder. The additional spices listed above will add to the complexity of the dish, but a couple can be eliminated if you don’t have all of them on hand
Nutrition per serving
Calories 370
Fat 14 g
Saturated Fat 3.5 g
Protein 14 g
Carbohydrate 48 g
Fiber 8 g
Sodium 380 mg

Tweet

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

 

Come si dice “cookies?” Biscotti!

Test Kitchen Post by Stephanie Smith

This week’s Test Kitchen was dedicated to Italy. Being Italian and having about six years of high school Italian language classes under my belt–meaning I know how to say hello and goodbye—I was pretty excited to make biscotti this week! I’ve never made biscotti myself, but I’ve always drooled over the fresh-baked varieties that would show up on our holiday dessert tables baked by all of the women in my family.

Screenshot 2014-02-12 20.48.41

The first biscotti is said to come from the Tuscan town of Prato, during the eighteenth century. Boy, am I glad they’ve lasted long enough to still be part of the Italian culture! Though biscotti were originally unique to Italy, the recipe has since spread throughout Europe, and the cookie has been adapted to take on the flavors from many different European areas.

Screenshot 2014-02-12 20.49.24

Anytime I come to the test kitchen and there’s a dessert to be served, I get so excited—nothing’s better than a healthy dessert! This biscotti recipe was adapted from King Arthur Flour (who knew a legendary British leader would know a thing or two about biscotti!). This recipe is for mini biscotti, which means that not only should you yield about 66 biscotti out of one batch, but it also means that you can eat about four biscotti costing you only 160 calories.

Interestingly enough, the word “biscotti” actually translates to “twice baked.” And you guessed it: these cookies are twice baked, which gives them their hard and crunchy texture. So, you may want to save this recipe for a day when you’ve got a little extra time to tend to the oven, since the total time preparing and baking is about 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Screenshot 2014-02-12 20.49.04

 

One thing we noticed while baking was that the yield didn’t quite reach 66 per
batch. We doubled the batch, hoping for about 120, but we probably only got
about 90 mini biscotti. Keep in mind that the number of cookies you get out of your batch all depends on how you cut them.

Overall, this recipe got a big thumbs up! We all enjoyed ‘em, polished the plate
clean, and everybody went to grab a bag to bring home. I can’t wait to make these
at home to impress my family soon!

P.S. The title of this post translates to: “How do you say “cookies?” A nice phrase to know for the next time you’re in Italy looking for the sweets.

Screenshot 2014-02-12 20.49.37

Ingredients:

6 tablespoons butter
2/3 cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 large eggs
1 ¾ cups white whole wheat flour
½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats*
½ cup chopped nuts (optional)
3 tablespoons cinnamon-sugar for dusting (1/4 cup sugar mixed with 1 T cinnamon)
*for smoother texture, can pulverize oats in food processor if desired

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Lightly grease (or line with parchment) a large cookie sheet.
2. In a medium-sized bowl, beat together the butter, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, and vanilla until smooth.
3. Add the eggs and beat until the mixture is well combined. It may look a bit coagulated, but that’s okay.
4. Add the flour and oats, mixing to combine.
5. Stir in nuts if using.
6. Divide the dough into four equal pieces, placing them on the prepared baking sheet.
7. Shape each piece into a rough log about 10” to 11” long, placing the logs crosswise on the sheet, and spacing them about 2”       apart. Using damp hands, flatten and smooth the logs until they’re about ¾” thick, and about 1 ¼” wide.
8. Spritz the top of each log with water, and sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar.
9. Bake the logs for 23 to 25 minutes, until they’re beginning to brown around the bottom edges.
10. Remove them from the oven, and allow them to cool right on the pan for about 10 minutes. Spritz  with water, sprinkle with more cinnamon-sugar, and let them cool for another 15 to 20 minutes. While the logs are cooling, reduce the oven temperature to 325˚F.
11. Cut the logs crosswise into ½” to ¾” slices, using a sharp chef’s knife.
12. Place the biscotti back on the baking sheet, spacing them close together without touching.
13. Bake the biscotti for 25 minutes, until their cut edges are a light golden brown. Remove them from the oven, and cool on the pan.

Nutrition Facts:
Serving size: 4 biscotti
Calories: 160
Fat: 5 g
Saturated Fat: 3 g
Protein: 4 g
Carbohydrates: 24 g
Fiber: 1 g

 

Tweet

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Test Kitchen: Tapas Night

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and have board game competitions.

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 4.11.12 PM

 

Hola readers! Our latest installment of Karen Jacob’s Test Kitchen brings flavors from sunny Spain.  We made and tested three delicious tapas recipes, each with their own nutritious benefits.  For those who don’t know, tapas is a style of Spanish cuisine where many small plates are served and shared instead of one main dish per person.  This style of eating means you can get a lot of variety of food without feeling stuffed to the brim.

Our first recipe that we made was Patatas Bravas (“fierce potatoes”).  These were a cinch to make, but did take a little bit of time in the oven so plan ahead.  One thing to keep in mind is that we leave the skins on the potatoes.  This does two things: first it gives a little bit more texture to the dish, and second it means there is more nutritious bits left in the tots.  But make sure to rinse them well!

  The next dish we made was Spicy Roasted Chickpeas.  Chickpeas (also    known as garbanzo beans) are a great source of vegetarian protein and are extremely versatile.  The    masala spice isn’t for everyone though, so smell it before you decide to cook with it to make sure you  like it.

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 4.10.45 PM

  Last we reinvented the way we eat Spinach and Artichoke Dip.  By using light mayonnaise and less    cheese, the fat and sodium was cut way down but the flavor remained.  Frozen spinach and canned  artichoke hearts means this recipe is a snap to pull together.  The testers noticed that the recipe didn’t  brown as much on top as traditional S&A dip, but the flavor was still spot on.  Try this for your next  game day, or to make any party special.

 Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 4.10.55 PM

 

You’ll notice that each of the three tapas dishes we made focus on a different food group: carbohydrates (potatoes), protein (chickpeas), and vegetables (spinach and artichokes).  This is on purpose!  A well-balanced meal will have each food group represented in it, and the proportion should weigh heavily toward fruits and vegetables.  This rule also applies to snacks, so when snacking make sure to have carbs, protein, and a veggie or fruit.

So until next time readers, adios!

Recipes:

Sargent Choice Spinach Artichoke Dip      

Yield: 12 tapas servings
Ingredients:
1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach
¾ cup low-fat mayonnaise
½ cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated
1 can or jar 14-ounce artichoke hearts, rinsed, drained, and chopped
2 scallions, finely chopped
½ teaspoon Kosher salt

Directions:
1.  Preheat oven to 350˚F.
2.  Microwave the frozen spinach according to package directions. Drain all water and set aside.
3. In a medium bowl, mix together the mayonnaise and cheese. Stir in the artichoke hearts, scallions, salt, and spinach. Mix thoroughly.
4.  Spoon the mixture into a small casserole dish and bake for 25 minutes, or until hot. Serve with raw vegetables (baby carrots, celery etc.) and whole grain pita torn into bite sized pieces for dipping.

1 serving
Calories 49
Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0.5 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 5 g
Fiber 1 g

Recipe from Joy Bauer, Registered Dietitian.

 

Sargent Choice Patatas Bravas (“fierce potatoes”)
Yield: 12 tapas servings
Ingredients:
3 lbs red potatoes, cut into 1-inch thick wedges
6 T olive oil, divided
6 tsp. minced garlic divided
1.5 tsp hot smoked paprika, or more to taste
1.5 cups canned crushed tomatoes

 Directions:
1.  Preheat oven to 400˚
2.  Toss potatoes with 4 T oil on large baking sheet. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and pepper; cover tightly with foil and roast 20 minutes.
3. Remove foil, and continue roasting 12 minutes, or until potatoes are golden on bottom.
4.  Carefully turn potatoes, and roast 8 minutes more, or until browned.
5.  Sprinkle 2 teaspoons garlic over potatoes, and transfer to serving dish.
6.  Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 T oil in small saucepan over medium heat.  Add remaining 4 teaspoons garlic, and sauté 30 seconds, or until just fragrant.  Add paprika, sauté 10 seconds, then stir in tomatoes. Simmer 10 minutes.
7.  Spoon the sauce over the potatoes, or serve in a bowl along with toothpicks for dunking the potato wedges.

1 serving
Calories 160
Fat 7 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 21 g
Fiber 3 g

Recipe adapted from Vegetarian Times.

 

Sargent Choice Spicy Roasted Chickpeas
Yield: 8 tapas servings

Ingredients:
1 15-ounce chickpeas, canned
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp Kosher salt
2 tsp garam masala spice (or similar spice)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Pour the chickpeas into a colander and drain and rinse well under water. Pat dry.
  3. Toss the chickpeas with the olive oil and spread out on a large cookie sheet.
  4. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until brown and crispy.
  5. Turn and stir every ten minutes to prevent burning.
  6. Take out and toss to taste with salt and spices.
  7. Let cool completely before serving.
1 serving
Calories 70
Fat 2 g
Saturated Fat 0 g
Protein 3 g
Carbohydrates 10 g
Fiber 3 g

 

 

Tweet

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

This cake is bananas…B-A-N-A-N-A-S!

Test Kitchen Date: January 22, 2014

By: Stephanie Smith

Last week was my first time ever attending the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen after being at BU for three and half years. I remember the first time I met Karen Jacobs during freshmen year and heard about her test kitchen, I wanted to attend so badly. But life caught up with me (mostly the workload that I certainly wasn’t prepared for) and I never dipped my toes in the test kitchen’s waters.

So last week, when I was told that I would be going to my first test kitchen and making a banana cake, I was thrilled and so excited to see what all the fuss was about when people spoke of Karen Jacobs and her test kitchen.

I was immediately greeted by fellow classmates that were just as excited as I was, to be surrounded by friendly faces ready to bake. I met people from different colleges throughout BU, people coming from all over the country, and even some students who were in the U.S. for the first time. After a few minutes of chatting and getting to know one another with a cup of tea in hand, everyone got to work.

Since we were quadrupling the recipe (to feed all of our hungry bellies, and the security guards downstairs) there were many hands on deck–cracking eggs, mashing bananas, measuring ingredients, beating mixtures, and mixing the batter until their arms felt like jell-o.

IMG_5285

The recipe turned out to be a hit! One that would get people coming back for seconds, thirds, and maybe even a fourth time. Around the Apples-to-Apples table, where we played while waiting for the cake to bake, thumbs shot up into the air with approval, as everyone’s first bite was delicious.

IMG_5290

 You may be thinking, but how was the recipe so different than a banana bread? Well, it was definitely different! It was in fact, “cakier,” as one might assume by the title. The cakes were topped with a low-fat cream cheese frosting that added the perfect amount of sweetness. This too made the dessert seem more like a cake than a bread.

bananacake

We did make one slight change to the second batch of two cakes. We decided to add an extra cup of mashed bananas, after having had already mashed a few extras. Those cakes were much more moist and preferred by many, including myself! So, if you’re feeling up to a little extra arm workout to mash an extra banana or two, go for it!

We would definitely advise you to keep an eye on the time in the oven. After baking for the recommended 25 minutes, most of the cakes needed a bit more time in the oven to continue to cook through and firm up. But, it does depend on the taste that you’re looking for. Some people enjoyed the cakes that were a little gooier! Just be sure to stick a toothpick in the center of the cake to test whether or not they are done to your liking and take them out of the oven whenever you feel like the texture is perfect for you!

RECIPE:

Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
Recipe adapted from Moosewood Restaurant
Yields 24 servings

Banana Cake Ingredients:
1/2 cup butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar
3 large eggs
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 cups whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 cups mashed ripe bananas (3-4)

Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients:
1/2 cup butter, at room temperature
4 ounces light cream cheese, at room temperature
2 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions for cake:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Lightly grease 12x9x2-inch baking pan.
3. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter and sugar.
4. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat until smooth and creamy.
5. In a separate bowl, mix the flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder.
6. Add half of the dry mixture to the sugar mixture and beat until smooth.
7. Add the mashed banana and mix.
8. Add the remaining flour mixture and beat until smooth.
9. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake until golden brown and a knife inserted in the center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Allow to cool before frosting.

Directions for frosting:
1. Beat the butter and cream cheese in a large mixing bowl until smooth.
2. Add the confectioner’s sugar, one cup at a time and beat until smooth.
3. Add the vanilla and beat to incorporate.
4. Spread frosting over cake in thin layer.

Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts for one square:
Calories: 190, Fat: 7g, Saturated Fat: 4g, Protein: 3g, Carbohydrates: 29g, Fiber: 1g
Tweet

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

A Fiery Interview

By Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

http://kidshealth.org/parent/firstaid_safe/home/headers_84420/P_fire_safety1.jpg

http://kidshealth.org/parent/firstaid_safe/home/headers_84420/P_fire_safety1.jpg

This past summer I moved into my first place on my own, and while I felt pretty proud that I managed to take care of myself for three months, I have to admit that it was a pretty hilarious experience.

For example, I would sometimes play the age old college game called “How long can I stretch out my food before I actually need to go to the grocery store?” It usually turned into four nights in a row of brown rice and carrots before I ran out of carrots, and then I had to play a new game called, “Malnutrition vs. Money.”

I know, I’m not setting the best example as a nutrition blogger. I’m just being real.

Anyway, as I mentioned, it was kind of hilarious trying to adjust. I learned a very frightening (though rather entertaining in retrospect) lesson through a friend about fire safety, who had a “I’m about to burn my place down” moment, which made me realize that I know nothing about fire-prevention.

So here I am, to teach you kiddos about being smart in the kitchen. I’ve contacted a couple of Safety Specialists from BU’s Environmental Health and Safety Department to give you guys some basic info on how to not set yourself on fire.

http://tedfordinsurance.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/kitchen-fire.jpg

http://tedfordinsurance.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/kitchen-fire.jpg

Victoria Stoessel: Safety Specialist, Campus & Clinical Safety & Freddy Dusseault:  Senior Safety Specialist, former Fire Chief, Hudson, MA.

What are the top three steps you can take to prevent/put out a fire while cooking? I imagine the first is to know where your fire extinguisher is, correct?

Freddy: Well …not necessarily, when dealing with cooking pan fires you want to know where the pan cover is located, have it nearby. Simply put the cover on the burning pan and the flames soon go out. The fire uses up the oxygen in it and no oxygen = no fire!

If you discharge an extinguisher on a grease fire the “punch” from the initial discharge can be pretty powerful and knock over the flaming pan or splatter the flaming grease / oil on to those nice cabinets or worse the paper plates you are going to eat from and then you REALLY have a problem!

And don’t use water either that will just spread the flames too….So smothering the fire with the cover is really your best bet.

Victoria: Keeping a 2 ½lb fire extinguisher under the sink or in a nearby closet is always a good idea to have in the kitchen area.

Now…how do I use the fire extinguisher?

Victoria: If it becomes necessary to use a fire extinguisher remember PASS:

P: Pull the pin. (The pin of a fire extinguisher might have a zip tie that will break away, set it down and hold it by the neck of the bottle, not the handles, to ensure it doesn’t get stuck while you are trying to remove it).

A: Aim the nozzle. (Point the nozzle of the fire extinguisher towards the BASE of the fire – not the higher flames, if you go for the origin of the fire you are more likely to put it out than if you are just fanning down the fire by aiming higher).

S: Squeeze the handle. (Now that you are holding the nozzle aimed at the base of the fire, squeeze down on the handle to activate the fire extinguisher).

S: Sweep. (In a sweeping lateral motion, aimed at the base of the fire, while squeezing the handle, empty the contents of the fire extinguisher).

REMEMBER – if you have to use a fire extinguisher, you should also be pulling the fire alarm for the building, it might be the fire doesn’t go out so easily & giving other occupants extra minutes to evacuate can be critical. If you empty a fire extinguisher and the fire is still going, close the doors/windows to the room (if possible), evacuate, make sure the alarm has been activated and ensure the authorities have been notified.

http://cf.ltkcdn.net/safety/images/std/116578-232x317-Kitchenfireprevention.jpg

http://cf.ltkcdn.net/safety/images/std/116578-232×317-Kitchenfireprevention.jpg

The pilot light in my oven just went off and I’m too scared to try figuring it out on my own because I’d like to keep my eyebrows from burning off…how do I get it back on?

Freddy: First determine if the pilot light is the problem and you are not dealing with a natural gas leak. There is a small gas flame usually mid-point between the two burner elements on each side of a stove. If the pilot light is not burning then that is most likely the problem. Open a window to vent the area for ½ hour or so. Lift the top of the stove (it’s hinged) and using a long stemmed lighter or match reignite the small flame at the orifice. Check that the stove will light.

Say me and my fraternity brothers want to set up a grill out front on the sidewalk or on our patio. Are there certain regulations about this? Should I tell Drew that he needs to stop spraying the lighter fluid everywhere?

Victoria: I would keep a close eye on Drew and his lighter fluid – especially if there are any bystanders or anything that might catch around where he’s spraying lighter fluid. Staying away from public path’s would be a good idea – stick to the ground level patio.  

Freddy: As for the city regulations, propane grills and open flame charcoal devices on any level of a dwelling other than ground level are illegal under Massachusetts and Boston Fire Codes. Serious penalties exist for violation of these laws.  Also, where is that the grill when not in use? Is it stored inside the front entry ???? ….not a good idea! Make sure storage is safe and doesn’t clutter up egress routes in and out of dwellings.

Listen, Victoria, I can’t afford to buy coffee every day, and I definitely need a caffeine boost to make it through my 8am. Actually I need caffeine to make it through anything that lasts more than 30 minutes. Why can’t I have a coffee maker in my dorm?

Victoria: Coffee makers use a lot of heat to brew up the tasty, life giving beverage, which makes them a potential ignition source. They are against BU’s policy to have in dorms because we want to have the least amount of electronics that could start fires as possible. National statistics show that many college fires are started each year by coffee makers – better to be proactive and eliminate one potential source of ignition; plus, we have plenty of great places to grab a cup of Joe on the road.

[In comment on electric grills…] Victoria: Electric grills in dorms are on the list of prohibited items based on Res Life’s guide –there is a chance of catching something on fire – don’t risk it!

Where can I go to find BU fire safety information and regulations?

Victoria: Our EHS Department has a page dedicated to information about fire safety – this is the link: http://www.bu.edu/ehs/plans/management-plans/safety-and-health/fire-safety/

boston fire

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_PQbVMfpHJBg/TDNVNxLAmDI/AAAAAAAADVU/zb-wseve3x0/s1600/IMG_2446.JPG

Freddy: The meaning of life is determined by the….. liver (both the person and organ) – So, be sure you don’t drink too much and you will enjoy a long and meaningful life !  J heh heh

Victoria: To live long enough to figure it out for yourself! Stay safe & keep the cardboard pizza boxes off the stove!

Other Tips

Victoria:

  • ALWAYS stay with whatever you are cooking, do not set a timer and think nothing can go wrong – being attentive is critical to avoiding flare-ups that can lead to a fire.
  • Keep all combustible items away from the cooking area (pizza boxes, paper towels or napkins, even oven mitts or pot holders should be clear of the immediate cooking area.
  • If you wear baggy shirts or big hoodies, keep your sleeves rolled up to ensure that YOU don’t become part of a kitchen fire
  • As a general rule – if you see crumbs before you start cooking, clean them out.
  • [With regard to pizza] remove the pizza from the box and put it on an oven safe tray or directly on the wire racks inside the stove. If it’s a frozen pizza you are taking out of a box – make sure you ALSO remove the cardboard under the pizza before you place it in the stove!

For other kitchen safety information, visit this site: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/fire-prevention-week

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

Snacking on the Go

by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

http://www.infinitelifefitness.com/tag/cheap-healthy-snacks/

Gather round children. We’re here today to talk about how to snack wisely when you’re on the go. I sat down with SCNC RD Sarah Butler to get some tips for ya’ll, cause I know how hard it is to fit good snacks into a busy day. All tips below are from her, so let’s get a nice preemptory round of applause for Sarah. *insert clapping*

First, Sarah wanted to set the basics straight. If you know you have a lot of classes back to back and won’t have time to grab something or eat a meal, bring a snack with you to eat during class. Most professors don’t mind, and if you aren’t sure if it’s okay, just ask your professor before class if it would be too distracting to him/her. If you’re snacking in class, you might want to have a relatively quite/unobtrusive snack, like a banana instead of an apple. Yogurt is good too because it’s not loud or big, even though some yogurts have a strong scent. You can always stick to the classic granola bar, which, if you’re trying to keep it quiet, you can just open before your class starts and keep it on your desk till you’re ready to eat it.

Don’t forget that you can order a Rhetty-to-go meal, which counts as one meal swipe, the night before your busy days. Sarah is a fan of the Rhetty-to-go system because it makes life easier for students who have little time to stop for snacks and meals. You can have half a sandwich for a snack earlier in the day and save the other half for later, or eat your whole meal whenever you get the chance.

Sarah then broke it down more specifically. If you know you’re gonna eat in about an hour but you need something RIGHT NOW, keep it simple. Try a fruit or vegetable snack for quick filling power. If you need something to last a little bit longer, add a protein into the mix, like maybe an apple with peanut butter or carrot sticks and hummus. If you’re not gonna get the chance to eat for about three hours, have a mini-meal! You’ll want to have a grain, a vegetable or fruit, and a protein. An example Sarah poses is one serving of 100% whole wheat Wheat Thins with some veggies and a string cheese (the low-fat string cheese at City Co is an easy, inexpensive grab!). Or even a half peanut butter sandwich and a banana, like a healthy take on the Elvis Presley sandwich. (And then, in a separate comment, Sarah mused, “Why do I always talk about Elvis?”) If you wanna read more about why this mini-meal is a good choice, check out our meal planning information.

http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/ZNWyhl-I_ak/maxresdefault.jpg

Sarah also wants to give mad love to the Clif bar. And really the Luna and Odwalla bars too–any in the 200 calorie range. Why, you ask? Because a bar of about 200 calories will actually fill you up and satisfy you, unlike the “100 Calorie” bars that are so popular these days. Sarah and I agreed during our interview that every time we eat a 100 Calorie bar, we get to the end and wonder, “Where did it go?” I personally have that Patrick Star moment where I look at my friend and say, “You took my only food, now I’m gonna starve!” The Clif/Luna/Odwalla bar alone will last you through your long class, and if you add a piece of fruit with it you’ll be set for even longer.

Last big tip Sarah wanted to give is that if you like to eat at the dining halls a lot, you should get an Unlimited Meal Plan if you and your family can swing the extra $280. With this plan, the dining hall becomes an endless meal and snack supply for you because you can go in and have a glass of chocolate milk and a banana with peanut butter if you only have 20 minutes to spare, and then you don’t have to pay on-hand cash for a snack at a convenience store. You could even swipe in for just a piece of fruit and not have to worry about running out of meals. Always utilize the 1-piece-of-fruit-may-leave-the-dining-hall-with-you-at-a-time rule, because then you have a snack for later that you don’t have to find time to buy. The deadline to change your meal plan for the semester has passed, but keep this in mind for next year!

To wrap up, I wanna guide ya’ll to some resources on our Sargent Choice website. Find here some tips about figuring out if you’re actually hungry or if it’s something else, (like maybe your parents always told you to clean your plate even though you got full before you finished the meal). Learn your nutritional ABC’s here by clicking through the tab on the right-hand side. And finally, here is our official smart snacking chart.

Sayonara.

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

Weight Loss Applications: To use? Or Not To Use?

By Jesse Crowley, Dietetics Student, Sargent Collegemichelle

Today, 91% of adult Americans own a cellphone and 56% of American adults have a smartphone. The general public is beginning to trust their smartphones with everything, from waking them up in the morning to managing their bank accounts. Should we now trust them with our healthcare?

A recent study conducted by a research group, including Sargent College’s own, Professor Michelle Debiasse, investigated the value of Apple and Android weight loss applications. The researchers compared the apps’ components with evidence-based practices used by professionals. These practices are tested and proven to affect weight loss.  The researchers came to two conclusions:

  1. Popular weight loss apps are not necessarily grounded in evidence-based practices
  2. Paid apps do not use more evidence-based practices than free apps

mynetdairyThey found that the two best apps, MyNetDiary and MyNetDiary PRO, utilized 65% of the practices; the next best apps dropped to 25% utilization. The popular apps, Lose It! and MyFitnessPal, only met 15% of the criteria. The apps were missing components that would aid users in real-life application, including ways to manage stress, relapses, and negative thinking. Both MyNetDiary and MyNetDiary PRO used the same number of evidence-based practices, but MyNetDiary PRO costs $3.99, while MyNetDiary is free.

Although these apps do not include all of the practices recommended by trained professionals, the use of technology as an extension of healthcare is an expanding and useful field. Primary care physicians are pressed for time with patients; if a doctor were to see an obese patient, they would have to address all of the medical complications that come with obesity, leaving them no time to address the complexity of weight loss. These apps can be helpful in weight loss, but as Professor Debiasse explained, counseling must be ongoing for long periods of time and sustained for on to see any results. The best way to achieve this type of care is to see a professional that specializes in this field, like the dietitians of the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center.

To learn more about the role a registered dietitian (RD) can play in your life refer to this earlier blog post: “What’s In a Title?

To read the entire research article: Evidence-Based Strategies in Weight-Loss Mobile Apps

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

Thanksgivukkah: Once in a Lifetime

By Alyssa Langer, Dietetics and Journalism Student, SAR and COM

http://wp.patheos.com.s3.amazonaws.com/blogs/getreligion/files/2013/11/thanksgivukkah_largelogo2_icontext.png

http://wp.patheos.com.s3.amazonaws.com/blogs/getreligion/files/2013/11/thanksgivukkah_largelogo2_icontext.png

Why is this Hanukkah different from all other Hanukkahs? Because it happens to coincide with Thanksgiving. The eight-day Jewish holiday start date can vary due to the Hebrew calendar, though it typically occurs in December.

While, to some, this overlapping may not seem like a big deal, it actually is because this phenomenon last happened in 1888 and, according to calculations, it will not occur again for over an estimated 70,000 years. Interestingly, the woman who coined the term Thanksgivukkah—as well as the owner of the trademark and Twitter account—is from the Boston area. She thought of the idea in 2011 as she was driving.

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino even pronounced November 28 as “Thanksgivukkah Day.” In addition, in honor of the hybrid holiday, Macy’s announced that the Thanksgiving Day Parade will include a giant dreidel.

More importantly, however, this holiday provides a unique foodie opportunity to get creative by fusing together the traditional staples of two completely separate holidays of which food plays a major role.

Just type ‘Thanksgivukkah’ into Google or Buzzfeed and you will see just how excited people are for this holiday. The recipe ideas are endless. No, I’m not talking about gefilte fish as an appetizer and turkey as an entrée; I’m talking about a seamless, natural blending of classic Thanksgiving and Hanukkah flavors into one dish. Some examples include: cranberry sauce-filled sufganiyot (donuts), tzimmes pie with sweet potato and apple filling, challah stuffing, pecan pie rugelach (pastry), turkey shaped pumpkin challah, pumpkin kugel, and sweet potato latkes topped with cranberry sauce and apple-cinnamon yogurt.

With all that said, keep in mind that the average person consumes 2,300 calories at a typical holiday meal according to Sargent College professor and registered dietitian Joan Salge Blake. So while the holidays are certainly a time to enjoy your holiday favorites, be sure to practice thoughtful eating.

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Test Kitchen: Holiday Cranberry Bread

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and have epic Bananagram competitions.

breadI don’t know about you all, but I love the weather in November.  Just cold enough where you need to bundle up, but not so bad that the Comm Ave wind tunnel freezes you to the bone.  Cold weather is also the best time to bake, so the Test Kitchen decided to try out a new recipe for cranberry bread.  This recipe comes from Honest Mom Nutrition, a lovely blog run by the registered dietitian Leslie Judge. Ms. Judge is an oncology dietitian, and topics on her blog range from healthy snacks for kids to Fab Five lists, which are quick and simple lists of ways to improve your diet.

Cranberries are a seasonal treat, but if this recipe was to be made in the summer good swaps would be raspberries or blueberries.  Heck, you could even make these breads in the winter!  There are a few things that we discovered while baking this recipe.  First, it is very important to cream the sugar and butter well before adding the orange juice or eggs.  Also, the whole wheat flour tends to be a little dense, so sifting the flour beforehand may be beneficial.  These two tips will ensure the bread is light and fluffy when it comes out of the oven.

P.S. Readers, I highly suggest you purchase the game Bananagrams.  I think I’m late picking up on this pop culture phenomenon, but man it was an addicting time at the Test Kitchen last week.  We must have played for 45 minutes straight.  Seriously, buy it.

Ingredients:hands

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1 12- oz bag fresh or frozen cranberries
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F.
  2. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt together in a large bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix sugar, orange juice, butter and egg until completely combined.
  4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir until just combined.  Stir in cranberries and nuts.
  5. Bake in greased loaf pan for 55-65 minutes until inserted knife comes out clean.

 

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website