Snacking on the Go

by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television student, College of Communication

http://www.infinitelifefitness.com/tag/cheap-healthy-snacks/

Gather round children. We’re here today to talk about how to snack wisely when you’re on the go. I sat down with SCNC RD Sarah Butler to get some tips for ya’ll, cause I know how hard it is to fit good snacks into a busy day. All tips below are from her, so let’s get a nice preemptory round of applause for Sarah. *insert clapping*

First, Sarah wanted to set the basics straight. If you know you have a lot of classes back to back and won’t have time to grab something or eat a meal, bring a snack with you to eat during class. Most professors don’t mind, and if you aren’t sure if it’s okay, just ask your professor before class if it would be too distracting to him/her. If you’re snacking in class, you might want to have a relatively quite/unobtrusive snack, like a banana instead of an apple. Yogurt is good too because it’s not loud or big, even though some yogurts have a strong scent. You can always stick to the classic granola bar, which, if you’re trying to keep it quiet, you can just open before your class starts and keep it on your desk till you’re ready to eat it.

Don’t forget that you can order a Rhetty-to-go meal, which counts as one meal swipe, the night before your busy days. Sarah is a fan of the Rhetty-to-go system because it makes life easier for students who have little time to stop for snacks and meals. You can have half a sandwich for a snack earlier in the day and save the other half for later, or eat your whole meal whenever you get the chance.

Sarah then broke it down more specifically. If you know you’re gonna eat in about an hour but you need something RIGHT NOW, keep it simple. Try a fruit or vegetable snack for quick filling power. If you need something to last a little bit longer, add a protein into the mix, like maybe an apple with peanut butter or carrot sticks and hummus. If you’re not gonna get the chance to eat for about three hours, have a mini-meal! You’ll want to have a grain, a vegetable or fruit, and a protein. An example Sarah poses is one serving of 100% whole wheat Wheat Thins with some veggies and a string cheese (the low-fat string cheese at City Co is an easy, inexpensive grab!). Or even a half peanut butter sandwich and a banana, like a healthy take on the Elvis Presley sandwich. (And then, in a separate comment, Sarah mused, “Why do I always talk about Elvis?”) If you wanna read more about why this mini-meal is a good choice, check out our meal planning information.

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Sarah also wants to give mad love to the Clif bar. And really the Luna and Odwalla bars too–any in the 200 calorie range. Why, you ask? Because a bar of about 200 calories will actually fill you up and satisfy you, unlike the “100 Calorie” bars that are so popular these days. Sarah and I agreed during our interview that every time we eat a 100 Calorie bar, we get to the end and wonder, “Where did it go?” I personally have that Patrick Star moment where I look at my friend and say, “You took my only food, now I’m gonna starve!” The Clif/Luna/Odwalla bar alone will last you through your long class, and if you add a piece of fruit with it you’ll be set for even longer.

Last big tip Sarah wanted to give is that if you like to eat at the dining halls a lot, you should get an Unlimited Meal Plan if you and your family can swing the extra $280. With this plan, the dining hall becomes an endless meal and snack supply for you because you can go in and have a glass of chocolate milk and a banana with peanut butter if you only have 20 minutes to spare, and then you don’t have to pay on-hand cash for a snack at a convenience store. You could even swipe in for just a piece of fruit and not have to worry about running out of meals. Always utilize the 1-piece-of-fruit-may-leave-the-dining-hall-with-you-at-a-time rule, because then you have a snack for later that you don’t have to find time to buy. The deadline to change your meal plan for the semester has passed, but keep this in mind for next year!

To wrap up, I wanna guide ya’ll to some resources on our Sargent Choice website. Find here some tips about figuring out if you’re actually hungry or if it’s something else, (like maybe your parents always told you to clean your plate even though you got full before you finished the meal). Learn your nutritional ABC’s here by clicking through the tab on the right-hand side. And finally, here is our official smart snacking chart.

Sayonara.

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

Weight Loss Applications: To use? Or Not To Use?

By Jesse Crowley, Dietetics Student, Sargent Collegemichelle

Today, 91% of adult Americans own a cellphone and 56% of American adults have a smartphone. The general public is beginning to trust their smartphones with everything, from waking them up in the morning to managing their bank accounts. Should we now trust them with our healthcare?

A recent study conducted by a research group, including Sargent College’s own, Professor Michelle Debiasse, investigated the value of Apple and Android weight loss applications. The researchers compared the apps’ components with evidence-based practices used by professionals. These practices are tested and proven to affect weight loss.  The researchers came to two conclusions:

  1. Popular weight loss apps are not necessarily grounded in evidence-based practices
  2. Paid apps do not use more evidence-based practices than free apps

mynetdairyThey found that the two best apps, MyNetDiary and MyNetDiary PRO, utilized 65% of the practices; the next best apps dropped to 25% utilization. The popular apps, Lose It! and MyFitnessPal, only met 15% of the criteria. The apps were missing components that would aid users in real-life application, including ways to manage stress, relapses, and negative thinking. Both MyNetDiary and MyNetDiary PRO used the same number of evidence-based practices, but MyNetDiary PRO costs $3.99, while MyNetDiary is free.

Although these apps do not include all of the practices recommended by trained professionals, the use of technology as an extension of healthcare is an expanding and useful field. Primary care physicians are pressed for time with patients; if a doctor were to see an obese patient, they would have to address all of the medical complications that come with obesity, leaving them no time to address the complexity of weight loss. These apps can be helpful in weight loss, but as Professor Debiasse explained, counseling must be ongoing for long periods of time and sustained for on to see any results. The best way to achieve this type of care is to see a professional that specializes in this field, like the dietitians of the Sargent Choice Nutrition Center.

To learn more about the role a registered dietitian (RD) can play in your life refer to this earlier blog post: “What’s In a Title?

To read the entire research article: Evidence-Based Strategies in Weight-Loss Mobile Apps

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

 

Thanksgivukkah: Once in a Lifetime

By Alyssa Langer, Dietetics and Journalism Student, SAR and COM

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Why is this Hanukkah different from all other Hanukkahs? Because it happens to coincide with Thanksgiving. The eight-day Jewish holiday start date can vary due to the Hebrew calendar, though it typically occurs in December.

While, to some, this overlapping may not seem like a big deal, it actually is because this phenomenon last happened in 1888 and, according to calculations, it will not occur again for over an estimated 70,000 years. Interestingly, the woman who coined the term Thanksgivukkah—as well as the owner of the trademark and Twitter account—is from the Boston area. She thought of the idea in 2011 as she was driving.

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino even pronounced November 28 as “Thanksgivukkah Day.” In addition, in honor of the hybrid holiday, Macy’s announced that the Thanksgiving Day Parade will include a giant dreidel.

More importantly, however, this holiday provides a unique foodie opportunity to get creative by fusing together the traditional staples of two completely separate holidays of which food plays a major role.

Just type ‘Thanksgivukkah’ into Google or Buzzfeed and you will see just how excited people are for this holiday. The recipe ideas are endless. No, I’m not talking about gefilte fish as an appetizer and turkey as an entrée; I’m talking about a seamless, natural blending of classic Thanksgiving and Hanukkah flavors into one dish. Some examples include: cranberry sauce-filled sufganiyot (donuts), tzimmes pie with sweet potato and apple filling, challah stuffing, pecan pie rugelach (pastry), turkey shaped pumpkin challah, pumpkin kugel, and sweet potato latkes topped with cranberry sauce and apple-cinnamon yogurt.

With all that said, keep in mind that the average person consumes 2,300 calories at a typical holiday meal according to Sargent College professor and registered dietitian Joan Salge Blake. So while the holidays are certainly a time to enjoy your holiday favorites, be sure to practice thoughtful eating.

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Test Kitchen: Holiday Cranberry Bread

By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and have epic Bananagram competitions.

breadI don’t know about you all, but I love the weather in November.  Just cold enough where you need to bundle up, but not so bad that the Comm Ave wind tunnel freezes you to the bone.  Cold weather is also the best time to bake, so the Test Kitchen decided to try out a new recipe for cranberry bread.  This recipe comes from Honest Mom Nutrition, a lovely blog run by the registered dietitian Leslie Judge. Ms. Judge is an oncology dietitian, and topics on her blog range from healthy snacks for kids to Fab Five lists, which are quick and simple lists of ways to improve your diet.

Cranberries are a seasonal treat, but if this recipe was to be made in the summer good swaps would be raspberries or blueberries.  Heck, you could even make these breads in the winter!  There are a few things that we discovered while baking this recipe.  First, it is very important to cream the sugar and butter well before adding the orange juice or eggs.  Also, the whole wheat flour tends to be a little dense, so sifting the flour beforehand may be beneficial.  These two tips will ensure the bread is light and fluffy when it comes out of the oven.

P.S. Readers, I highly suggest you purchase the game Bananagrams.  I think I’m late picking up on this pop culture phenomenon, but man it was an addicting time at the Test Kitchen last week.  We must have played for 45 minutes straight.  Seriously, buy it.

Ingredients:hands

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1 12- oz bag fresh or frozen cranberries
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F.
  2. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt together in a large bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix sugar, orange juice, butter and egg until completely combined.
  4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir until just combined.  Stir in cranberries and nuts.
  5. Bake in greased loaf pan for 55-65 minutes until inserted knife comes out clean.

 

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

BU Participates in 27th Annual bostonCANshare

­Anna Lee, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

Thanksgiving is a time devoted to family, fellowship, and most importantly – food. Next Thursday many of us will indulge in our much anticipated holiday favorites: mashed potatoes, turkey and gravy, green beans, apple pie, yams… the list goes on. For many families however, putting food on the table this holiday season will pose a financial burden.

Over the past 5 years there has been a near 20% increase in the number of families served by the Greater Boston Food Bank. In the United States alone, 1 in 5 children are hungry. When people hear the term “hungry” they often think of individuals with a lack of food accessibility. Instead, “hungry” can also refer to those who do not have access to nutrient dense foods, which Mayor Menino aims to target through his annual holiday food drive.

This year Boston University is participating in the 27th annual bostonCANshare, a holiday food drive sponsored by the City of Boston. This year’s campaign started on October 21st and will come to an end next Friday, December 6th. To participate, individuals are asked to donate canned goods and/or money, and to spread the word about the campaign!  Donated food will go to the Greater Boston Food Bank who supplies food to local pantries throughout the Boston area. (Last year’s campaign raised over 55,000 pounds of food that went to feed local families!)

Acceptable canned donations include:

  • Dairy: Milk – dried, evaporated, and boxed (such as Parmalat)
  • Protein: Beef stew, nuts, peanut butter, beans, and peas (dried or canned), canned chili, tuna fish, chicken, salmon and other meats (canned)
  • Vegetables: Tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, spaghetti sauce, canned vegetables, tomato juice
  • Fruit: Raisins and other dried fruit with no added sugar, applesauce, any canned fruit in its own juice
  • Grains: Crackers, oatmeal, whole grain rice, all types of pasta, ready to eat low sugar/high fiber cereal (Cheerios, Raisin Bran, etc.)

Donations can be brought to:

  • BU Student Activities Office @ 1 University Road

Though this campaign will only be running for one more week, the Greater Boston Food Bank regularly accepts both donations and volunteers throughout the year.

For more information regarding the food drive and donation locations, visit their website at www.bostoncanshare.com.

 

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Sustainable Thanksgiving

Sarah Butler, MS, RD, LDN

With Thanksgiving just around the corner we turned to our trusted source, Sabrina Pashtan, Sustainability Coordinator for Boston University Dining Services to gain insight into how we can make this Thanksgiving a Sustainable Thanksgiving.

Here are Sabrina’s top four tips:

  1. Shop at your local farmers markets. Check out Farm Fresh to find out where is the closest farmers market to you, that is still open. Local ingredients should also be available at your local grocery store. Make sure to check the labels and signs!
  2. Use the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen List to know which fruits and vegetables are best to buy organic, based on pesticide residue. You can focus your dollars on fruits and veggies on the Dirty Dozen List and save some by buying conventional from the Clean Fifteen List.
  3. Use reusable platters and plates for your holiday meals to reduce waste. Also, remember to cook that pumpkin sitting on the stoop. It will make for a delicious pie! Here’s instructions on how to cook down a pumpkin.
  4. Look for turkeys and birds that are free-range, antibiotic-free and Humane-Certified, which means they have been raised humanely. There are several other third-party certifications to recognize humanely-raised meats, including Animal Welfare Approved Certified and the Global Animal Partnership.

    Having Sabrina as part of our team is something we are truly thankful for this Thanksgiving season.  Thank you Sabrina!

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Interview with Adam Pagan, Executive Chef

    By Annette Goldberg, SCNC Dietetic Intern

    Recently, I had the pleasure of sitting with Adam Pagan, the Executive Chef at 100 Bay State Road to learn more about the man behind the delicious meals.  Adam was born in Middleboro Mass and raised in Brockton.  He currently resides in Bridgewater, MA with his wife, Suzanne, and their children Nicholas age 7 and Leah age 9.  The kids enjoy school lunches at George Mitchell elementary school.

    Adam graduated from Johnson and Wales in 1996 with an Associates Degree.  He has been in food service his entire career – starting at the age of 15 as a dishwasher.  Before joining 100 Bay State Road, he worked for Aramark at the Boston Convention Center.

    Adam, why did you decide to join 100 BSR?

    I like opening businesses/cafes, l thought it would be a challenge.  And I like the direction BSR is going with campus dining.

    What is your position and what does it entail?

    I am Executive Chef with 100 BSR.  I do work with Sargent Choice, special meals across campus, help with Catering on the Charles at GSU and the campus chef doing VIP events, etc.

    What is the most important skill required to be an Executive Chef?

    Time management.  It is a position where you need to be able to multitask – knowing what needs to be done first, second – in order.  It is a skill you learn as a cook.  If you need to make a pasta dish, you put the water on first.  It is all about time management and prioritization.

    How does the Executive Chef differ from the Food Service Director?

    My position focuses on the food.  The Food Service Director focuses on the financials.

    What is the most challenging part of you job day to day?

    Communication between staff members would probably be the toughest.  It is important to get everyone on the same page.  There are a lot of employees with a lot of personalities.

    Tell me more about the walkie-talkies I see everyone carrying?  And how did you earn the code name “Blade”?

    My code name “Blade” was given to me by a co-worker.  I’m guessing it has to do with working with knives.  We have used the walkie-talkies since we opened; they are awesome.  I used them at the Convention Center and it is a way to make communication easier.  We don’t have to check our phones or look around searching for somebody; it’s instant.  And when someone calls us on the walkie-talkie, we know it is work-related.

    Is it true that people who work in food service and kitchen thrive on chaos?

    It is more organized chaos.  Unorganized chaos drives me nuts.  I think back at the Convention Center when we plated meals for 10,000 or 15,000 people.   You could have 125 or 150 people in the kitchen at once, but if everyone knows what they need to do someone with experience can walk into that kitchen and tell it is running well.  The chaos is organized.  You know right away if the wheels are going off the bus….

    What part of your job is the most fun?

    This is a generic answer, but I would say the food.  Tasting is fun.  When you taste something and it is right on – that’s nice.

    How does technology play a greater role in food service and the cafeteria?

    It is the instant feedback.  You don’t wait for a survey to go out every three months; you have a survey everyday – instantly.  We have a Director of Social Media that manages our twitter account and forwards the appropriate tweets to the dining halls.   We utilize Facebook and Instagram as well.  All of our equipment utilizes the latest technology.  If our refrigerators go below or above the specified temperatures, not only does an alarm sound but an email is sent to our Director of Sanitation.

    What are the unique challenges of serving a college population?

    The different palates.  Everyone has a different flavor profile.  What they like, what they don’t like, what they grew up with.  People are more “foodies” than they used to be.  There is instant access.  The students can watch a demonstration on the food network and look up the recipe on their phone while they stand in line.  It is good for us because they are more informed but it can be a challenge at the same time.

    What do you love about the student population?

    I love the energy.  It picks you up when you walk around a place where everyone is on the move.  You feed off of other people’s energy and the fast pace is nice.

    What do you wish the student population would do a bit differently?

    I think going out of their comfort zone and trying new foods.  There are a few students who don’t hesitate to try something new.  But there are the other times when you put out the meatloaf and mashed potatoes; some students are going there every time.

    What important piece of advice would you give to kids moving to apartments where they have to cook for themselves?

    I would say don’t be intimidated, you really only need to know 2-3 cooking techniques in order to cook just about anything. Learn how to sauté, braise, and how to use a knife.

    Who cooks and grocery shops at home?

    Suzanne.  I cook a little bit at home but not much.  Our meals today are geared toward the kids.  We try to keep it standard and low maintenance.  I’m pretty easy to please.

    How do you get your kids, Leah and Nicholas, to try new foods and eat healthy?

    It can be tough with both Leah and Nicholas.  We always try to talk about it.  The kids do school lunches this year.  Our new big thing (which is awesome) is to talk about what they had at lunch every day and critique it.  We have fun talking back and forth.  For example, the kids came home and said they had nachos for lunch.  I asked them to describe it – which wasn’t flattering.  So, that Friday, I made them nachos.  We made them together with fresh salsa, etc.  They didn’t go near it, but it was fun to make and show them!  You have to keep trying.  It is easy to introduce and educate when you are in the food business.

    What is your favorite healthy meal and your favorite unhealthy meal?

    Favorite healthy meal –chicken breast.  It can be prepared simply – marinated with fresh salsa.  Favorite unhealthy meal– onion rings – anything fried!

    A few of Adam Pagan’s recipes have been featured on our blog before:

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test Kitchen: Lemon Herb Tofu

    By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and chat about our favorite things.

    http://www.inboundsales.net/Portals/87880/images/Tofu-Image%5B1%5D.jpg

    Tofu is often a divisive food: people either love it or hate it.  I am one of those in the second camp, but in the spirit of trying new things I decided to give it a second chance with this new Sargent Choice recipe.  A common misconception about the SC program is that it is exclusively vegan or vegetarian.  But it’s not!  The protein used in our recipes is often plant based because it contains high levels of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals (healthy compounds in plants) with a low level of fat, but we have lots of recipes that have meat or poultry in them too.

    If you have never cooked with tofu before, never fear!  In this recipe, we noticed a few things that I will pass on to you.  First off, tofu tends to be a little crumbly so make sure you are buying either firm or extra firm for this recipe.  Be gentle when handling or cutting it, as we want cubes not crumbles (a few crumbles are OK).  Also, some people are turned off by the soft texture of tofu so if this applies to you, I recommend pre-baking the tofu a little before you put the marinade on.  5-8 minutes in the oven should do the trick.

    Overall, this new recipe was very good. Our tasters thought it was a little salty, so if you are salt sensitive maybe cut back on the soy sauce and substitute a little more lemon juice.  This tasty treat would be lovely if paired with a brown rice and vegetable pilaf, or some couscous and a salad.  I know that I enjoy trying new things, and I recommend that you all challenge yourself to try something that you thought you didn’t like each week.  You may surprise yourself!

    Lemon Herb Tofu

    Yields 4 servings

    Ingredients

    • 1 cake firm tofu (about 16 ounces)
    • ¼ cup lemon juice (fresh, bottled is fine)
    • 3 tablespoons light soy sauce (Kikkoman recommended)
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 teaspoons dried herbs (rosemary, dill, oregano)
    • ¼ black pepper
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 400°F
    2. Cut the block of tofu into 4 slices and then cut the slices into cubes or triangles.
    3. Spread the tofu pieces in a single layer in a lightly oiled pan large enough to hold them.
    4. Whisk together the lemon juice, soy sauce, oil, herbs, pepper, and garlic.  Pour over the tofu.
    5. Baked uncovered, stirring (and spooning the sauce over the tofu) every 10 or 15 minutes, until most of the marinade is absorbed and the tofu is firm and chewy, about 30 to 35 minutes.
    6. Serve hot, at room temperature, or chilled.

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    What is Unit Pricing?

    by Gina Petracca, Graduate Nutrition Student

    When you are grocery shopping and about to put a product in your basket, what do you look at? Do you look at the price? And if so, which price do you look at? Most people don’t realize that every item in the grocery store actually has two prices: the price you pay upfront at the cash register and the unit price. A unit price is exactly what it sounds like—it is the price of that product per unit (i.e. per gallon, ounce, pound, etc.). Looking at the unit price can help save you a lot of money. How? The unit price allows you to compare different products with each other and determine which option is the least expensive, without having to do any math or calculations on your own.

    The best way to understand how unit pricing works is by example. Let’s say you want to buy a box of cereal—you eat a bowl of cereal every morning—and are deciding between two options: the name brand (18oz. box for $3.00) versus the store brand (14oz. box for $2.50). You can do the calculations on your own to decide which option is the cheapest, by dividing the price you pay at the register by the number of ounces in the cereal box.

    • Name brand: $3.00/18oz = $0.16 per ounce
    • Store brand: $2.75/14oz = $0.20 per ounce

    Upon initial glance, the 14oz box appears to be the cheaper option (only $2.75 instead of $3); but when you do the math, the 18oz. box is actually cheaper. Finding out the price per unit is a relatively easy calculation to do. However, if you plan to compare the cost of a lot of products in the store, it would be tedious to go from aisle to aisle whipping out your calculator to do the math. That is where the unit price comes into play. The unit price does the calculation for you. For the cereal example above, the grocery store would have two prices labeled for each cereal box:

    Instead of wasting time doing math, you can quickly glance at the unit price, which easily tells you that the name brand cereal is the cheaper option per unit. Look at the unit price for the true price of the product.

    Let’s take another example. You are throwing a party and need to buy carrots to go with your famous dip. You can buy: baby carrots, a two-pound bag of regular carrots, or a five-pound bag of regular carrots. Again, you could bust out that calculator app on your phone and calculate how much each bag will cost you per pound, or you can look at the unit price:

    Clearly, the 5lb. bag of regular carrots is the cheapest option at only $0.66 per pound—the baby carrots are four times more expensive at $2.00 per pound!

    However, there are a few things to keep in mind when looking at unit price. Let’s look at the carrots again. We already know that the 5 lb. bag is technically the cheapest option, but keep in mind that you will have to cut all the carrots into carrot sticks yourself. You will also be left with lots of leftover carrots, if your partygoers do not eat all five pounds. You need to consider how much of the product you will actually use and whether or not you are willing to do the prep work. If you only need 2 pounds of carrots and are willing to cut the carrots, then the 2lb. bag is actually the best option for you. If you won’t use any leftovers and you are unwilling to chop the carrots, then go for the baby carrots—just know that you are paying a hefty fee for the convenience of this food (it’s already been washed, cut, and pre-measured for you).

    The greatest power of the unit price is that it is an informational tool. It makes you aware of the true cost of a product and gives you the knowledge to make informed decisions about how you spend your money.

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test kitchen: Pumpkin Bars

    by Jessica Crowley, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

    Halloween may be over, but I refuse to cut pumpkin from my diet until Black Friday. I strongly recommend this tasty treat; let your family know how thankful you are by whipping up a batch for them on Thanksgiving break. It was very easy and ready in no time at all.

    We began with mixing the dry and wet ingredients in separate bowls. Luckily, we could employ some of BU wrestling’s finest to hand mix, since the electric mixer was out of order. We combined the ingredients, which required a bit more man power. Then, all we had to do was stick it in a pan and bake. While the bars were baking we mixed the frosting. It was hard to believe that this recipe could ever be Sargent approved, but I’m not complaining.

    We didn’t have the required pan, so we baked it in your average disposable aluminum pan. This may have caused us to overfill the pans and make more of a cake than a bar, but it was still delicious.

    If you make this recipe, I guarantee you won’t be able to keep yourself from seconds; it was a fluffy pumpkin and spice filled wonder with a glaze of white frosting, reminiscent of the seemingly always premature snow of fall.

    Sargent Choice Pumpkin Bars
    Recipe adapted from Bon Appetit Magazine

    Yields 24 servings

    Ingredients:

    • 2 cups whole wheat flour
    • ¾ cup packed light brown sugar
    • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
    • 2 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
    • 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin
    • 4 large eggs
    • ½ cup vegetable oil

    ____________________________

    • 6 ounces light cream cheese, room temperature
    • 1 cup powdered sugar
    • 1/3 cup butter, room temperature

    Directions

    Bars

    1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F.
    2. Grease 15 ½ x 10 ½ x 1-inch baking sheet.
    3. Stir first 8 ingredients in large bowl to blend.
    4. Add pumpkin, eggs and oil and beat until blended
    5. Spread batter in prepared pan.
    6. Bake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Cool in pan.

    Frosting

    1. Beat cream cheese, powdered sugar and butter in medium bowl to blend. Spread frosting over cake in thin later. Cut cake into bars and serve. Enjoy!
    1 slice
    Calories 180
    Fat 9 g
    Saturated Fat 3 g
    Protein 3 g
    Carbohydrates 22 g
    Fiber 2 g

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website