BU Participates in 27th Annual bostonCANshare

­Anna Lee, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

Thanksgiving is a time devoted to family, fellowship, and most importantly – food. Next Thursday many of us will indulge in our much anticipated holiday favorites: mashed potatoes, turkey and gravy, green beans, apple pie, yams… the list goes on. For many families however, putting food on the table this holiday season will pose a financial burden.

Over the past 5 years there has been a near 20% increase in the number of families served by the Greater Boston Food Bank. In the United States alone, 1 in 5 children are hungry. When people hear the term “hungry” they often think of individuals with a lack of food accessibility. Instead, “hungry” can also refer to those who do not have access to nutrient dense foods, which Mayor Menino aims to target through his annual holiday food drive.

This year Boston University is participating in the 27th annual bostonCANshare, a holiday food drive sponsored by the City of Boston. This year’s campaign started on October 21st and will come to an end next Friday, December 6th. To participate, individuals are asked to donate canned goods and/or money, and to spread the word about the campaign!  Donated food will go to the Greater Boston Food Bank who supplies food to local pantries throughout the Boston area. (Last year’s campaign raised over 55,000 pounds of food that went to feed local families!)

Acceptable canned donations include:

  • Dairy: Milk – dried, evaporated, and boxed (such as Parmalat)
  • Protein: Beef stew, nuts, peanut butter, beans, and peas (dried or canned), canned chili, tuna fish, chicken, salmon and other meats (canned)
  • Vegetables: Tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, spaghetti sauce, canned vegetables, tomato juice
  • Fruit: Raisins and other dried fruit with no added sugar, applesauce, any canned fruit in its own juice
  • Grains: Crackers, oatmeal, whole grain rice, all types of pasta, ready to eat low sugar/high fiber cereal (Cheerios, Raisin Bran, etc.)

Donations can be brought to:

  • BU Student Activities Office @ 1 University Road

Though this campaign will only be running for one more week, the Greater Boston Food Bank regularly accepts both donations and volunteers throughout the year.

For more information regarding the food drive and donation locations, visit their website at www.bostoncanshare.com.

 

 

Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

Sustainable Thanksgiving

Sarah Butler, MS, RD, LDN

With Thanksgiving just around the corner we turned to our trusted source, Sabrina Pashtan, Sustainability Coordinator for Boston University Dining Services to gain insight into how we can make this Thanksgiving a Sustainable Thanksgiving.

Here are Sabrina’s top four tips:

  1. Shop at your local farmers markets. Check out Farm Fresh to find out where is the closest farmers market to you, that is still open. Local ingredients should also be available at your local grocery store. Make sure to check the labels and signs!
  2. Use the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen List to know which fruits and vegetables are best to buy organic, based on pesticide residue. You can focus your dollars on fruits and veggies on the Dirty Dozen List and save some by buying conventional from the Clean Fifteen List.
  3. Use reusable platters and plates for your holiday meals to reduce waste. Also, remember to cook that pumpkin sitting on the stoop. It will make for a delicious pie! Here’s instructions on how to cook down a pumpkin.
  4. Look for turkeys and birds that are free-range, antibiotic-free and Humane-Certified, which means they have been raised humanely. There are several other third-party certifications to recognize humanely-raised meats, including Animal Welfare Approved Certified and the Global Animal Partnership.

    Having Sabrina as part of our team is something we are truly thankful for this Thanksgiving season.  Thank you Sabrina!

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Interview with Adam Pagan, Executive Chef

    By Annette Goldberg, SCNC Dietetic Intern

    Recently, I had the pleasure of sitting with Adam Pagan, the Executive Chef at 100 Bay State Road to learn more about the man behind the delicious meals.  Adam was born in Middleboro Mass and raised in Brockton.  He currently resides in Bridgewater, MA with his wife, Suzanne, and their children Nicholas age 7 and Leah age 9.  The kids enjoy school lunches at George Mitchell elementary school.

    Adam graduated from Johnson and Wales in 1996 with an Associates Degree.  He has been in food service his entire career – starting at the age of 15 as a dishwasher.  Before joining 100 Bay State Road, he worked for Aramark at the Boston Convention Center.

    Adam, why did you decide to join 100 BSR?

    I like opening businesses/cafes, l thought it would be a challenge.  And I like the direction BSR is going with campus dining.

    What is your position and what does it entail?

    I am Executive Chef with 100 BSR.  I do work with Sargent Choice, special meals across campus, help with Catering on the Charles at GSU and the campus chef doing VIP events, etc.

    What is the most important skill required to be an Executive Chef?

    Time management.  It is a position where you need to be able to multitask – knowing what needs to be done first, second – in order.  It is a skill you learn as a cook.  If you need to make a pasta dish, you put the water on first.  It is all about time management and prioritization.

    How does the Executive Chef differ from the Food Service Director?

    My position focuses on the food.  The Food Service Director focuses on the financials.

    What is the most challenging part of you job day to day?

    Communication between staff members would probably be the toughest.  It is important to get everyone on the same page.  There are a lot of employees with a lot of personalities.

    Tell me more about the walkie-talkies I see everyone carrying?  And how did you earn the code name “Blade”?

    My code name “Blade” was given to me by a co-worker.  I’m guessing it has to do with working with knives.  We have used the walkie-talkies since we opened; they are awesome.  I used them at the Convention Center and it is a way to make communication easier.  We don’t have to check our phones or look around searching for somebody; it’s instant.  And when someone calls us on the walkie-talkie, we know it is work-related.

    Is it true that people who work in food service and kitchen thrive on chaos?

    It is more organized chaos.  Unorganized chaos drives me nuts.  I think back at the Convention Center when we plated meals for 10,000 or 15,000 people.   You could have 125 or 150 people in the kitchen at once, but if everyone knows what they need to do someone with experience can walk into that kitchen and tell it is running well.  The chaos is organized.  You know right away if the wheels are going off the bus….

    What part of your job is the most fun?

    This is a generic answer, but I would say the food.  Tasting is fun.  When you taste something and it is right on – that’s nice.

    How does technology play a greater role in food service and the cafeteria?

    It is the instant feedback.  You don’t wait for a survey to go out every three months; you have a survey everyday – instantly.  We have a Director of Social Media that manages our twitter account and forwards the appropriate tweets to the dining halls.   We utilize Facebook and Instagram as well.  All of our equipment utilizes the latest technology.  If our refrigerators go below or above the specified temperatures, not only does an alarm sound but an email is sent to our Director of Sanitation.

    What are the unique challenges of serving a college population?

    The different palates.  Everyone has a different flavor profile.  What they like, what they don’t like, what they grew up with.  People are more “foodies” than they used to be.  There is instant access.  The students can watch a demonstration on the food network and look up the recipe on their phone while they stand in line.  It is good for us because they are more informed but it can be a challenge at the same time.

    What do you love about the student population?

    I love the energy.  It picks you up when you walk around a place where everyone is on the move.  You feed off of other people’s energy and the fast pace is nice.

    What do you wish the student population would do a bit differently?

    I think going out of their comfort zone and trying new foods.  There are a few students who don’t hesitate to try something new.  But there are the other times when you put out the meatloaf and mashed potatoes; some students are going there every time.

    What important piece of advice would you give to kids moving to apartments where they have to cook for themselves?

    I would say don’t be intimidated, you really only need to know 2-3 cooking techniques in order to cook just about anything. Learn how to sauté, braise, and how to use a knife.

    Who cooks and grocery shops at home?

    Suzanne.  I cook a little bit at home but not much.  Our meals today are geared toward the kids.  We try to keep it standard and low maintenance.  I’m pretty easy to please.

    How do you get your kids, Leah and Nicholas, to try new foods and eat healthy?

    It can be tough with both Leah and Nicholas.  We always try to talk about it.  The kids do school lunches this year.  Our new big thing (which is awesome) is to talk about what they had at lunch every day and critique it.  We have fun talking back and forth.  For example, the kids came home and said they had nachos for lunch.  I asked them to describe it – which wasn’t flattering.  So, that Friday, I made them nachos.  We made them together with fresh salsa, etc.  They didn’t go near it, but it was fun to make and show them!  You have to keep trying.  It is easy to introduce and educate when you are in the food business.

    What is your favorite healthy meal and your favorite unhealthy meal?

    Favorite healthy meal –chicken breast.  It can be prepared simply – marinated with fresh salsa.  Favorite unhealthy meal– onion rings – anything fried!

    A few of Adam Pagan’s recipes have been featured on our blog before:

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test Kitchen: Lemon Herb Tofu

    By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and chat about our favorite things.

    http://www.inboundsales.net/Portals/87880/images/Tofu-Image%5B1%5D.jpg

    Tofu is often a divisive food: people either love it or hate it.  I am one of those in the second camp, but in the spirit of trying new things I decided to give it a second chance with this new Sargent Choice recipe.  A common misconception about the SC program is that it is exclusively vegan or vegetarian.  But it’s not!  The protein used in our recipes is often plant based because it contains high levels of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals (healthy compounds in plants) with a low level of fat, but we have lots of recipes that have meat or poultry in them too.

    If you have never cooked with tofu before, never fear!  In this recipe, we noticed a few things that I will pass on to you.  First off, tofu tends to be a little crumbly so make sure you are buying either firm or extra firm for this recipe.  Be gentle when handling or cutting it, as we want cubes not crumbles (a few crumbles are OK).  Also, some people are turned off by the soft texture of tofu so if this applies to you, I recommend pre-baking the tofu a little before you put the marinade on.  5-8 minutes in the oven should do the trick.

    Overall, this new recipe was very good. Our tasters thought it was a little salty, so if you are salt sensitive maybe cut back on the soy sauce and substitute a little more lemon juice.  This tasty treat would be lovely if paired with a brown rice and vegetable pilaf, or some couscous and a salad.  I know that I enjoy trying new things, and I recommend that you all challenge yourself to try something that you thought you didn’t like each week.  You may surprise yourself!

    Lemon Herb Tofu

    Yields 4 servings

    Ingredients

    • 1 cake firm tofu (about 16 ounces)
    • ¼ cup lemon juice (fresh, bottled is fine)
    • 3 tablespoons light soy sauce (Kikkoman recommended)
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 teaspoons dried herbs (rosemary, dill, oregano)
    • ¼ black pepper
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 400°F
    2. Cut the block of tofu into 4 slices and then cut the slices into cubes or triangles.
    3. Spread the tofu pieces in a single layer in a lightly oiled pan large enough to hold them.
    4. Whisk together the lemon juice, soy sauce, oil, herbs, pepper, and garlic.  Pour over the tofu.
    5. Baked uncovered, stirring (and spooning the sauce over the tofu) every 10 or 15 minutes, until most of the marinade is absorbed and the tofu is firm and chewy, about 30 to 35 minutes.
    6. Serve hot, at room temperature, or chilled.

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    What is Unit Pricing?

    by Gina Petracca, Graduate Nutrition Student

    When you are grocery shopping and about to put a product in your basket, what do you look at? Do you look at the price? And if so, which price do you look at? Most people don’t realize that every item in the grocery store actually has two prices: the price you pay upfront at the cash register and the unit price. A unit price is exactly what it sounds like—it is the price of that product per unit (i.e. per gallon, ounce, pound, etc.). Looking at the unit price can help save you a lot of money. How? The unit price allows you to compare different products with each other and determine which option is the least expensive, without having to do any math or calculations on your own.

    The best way to understand how unit pricing works is by example. Let’s say you want to buy a box of cereal—you eat a bowl of cereal every morning—and are deciding between two options: the name brand (18oz. box for $3.00) versus the store brand (14oz. box for $2.50). You can do the calculations on your own to decide which option is the cheapest, by dividing the price you pay at the register by the number of ounces in the cereal box.

    • Name brand: $3.00/18oz = $0.16 per ounce
    • Store brand: $2.75/14oz = $0.20 per ounce

    Upon initial glance, the 14oz box appears to be the cheaper option (only $2.75 instead of $3); but when you do the math, the 18oz. box is actually cheaper. Finding out the price per unit is a relatively easy calculation to do. However, if you plan to compare the cost of a lot of products in the store, it would be tedious to go from aisle to aisle whipping out your calculator to do the math. That is where the unit price comes into play. The unit price does the calculation for you. For the cereal example above, the grocery store would have two prices labeled for each cereal box:

    Instead of wasting time doing math, you can quickly glance at the unit price, which easily tells you that the name brand cereal is the cheaper option per unit. Look at the unit price for the true price of the product.

    Let’s take another example. You are throwing a party and need to buy carrots to go with your famous dip. You can buy: baby carrots, a two-pound bag of regular carrots, or a five-pound bag of regular carrots. Again, you could bust out that calculator app on your phone and calculate how much each bag will cost you per pound, or you can look at the unit price:

    Clearly, the 5lb. bag of regular carrots is the cheapest option at only $0.66 per pound—the baby carrots are four times more expensive at $2.00 per pound!

    However, there are a few things to keep in mind when looking at unit price. Let’s look at the carrots again. We already know that the 5 lb. bag is technically the cheapest option, but keep in mind that you will have to cut all the carrots into carrot sticks yourself. You will also be left with lots of leftover carrots, if your partygoers do not eat all five pounds. You need to consider how much of the product you will actually use and whether or not you are willing to do the prep work. If you only need 2 pounds of carrots and are willing to cut the carrots, then the 2lb. bag is actually the best option for you. If you won’t use any leftovers and you are unwilling to chop the carrots, then go for the baby carrots—just know that you are paying a hefty fee for the convenience of this food (it’s already been washed, cut, and pre-measured for you).

    The greatest power of the unit price is that it is an informational tool. It makes you aware of the true cost of a product and gives you the knowledge to make informed decisions about how you spend your money.

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test kitchen: Pumpkin Bars

    by Jessica Crowley, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

    Halloween may be over, but I refuse to cut pumpkin from my diet until Black Friday. I strongly recommend this tasty treat; let your family know how thankful you are by whipping up a batch for them on Thanksgiving break. It was very easy and ready in no time at all.

    We began with mixing the dry and wet ingredients in separate bowls. Luckily, we could employ some of BU wrestling’s finest to hand mix, since the electric mixer was out of order. We combined the ingredients, which required a bit more man power. Then, all we had to do was stick it in a pan and bake. While the bars were baking we mixed the frosting. It was hard to believe that this recipe could ever be Sargent approved, but I’m not complaining.

    We didn’t have the required pan, so we baked it in your average disposable aluminum pan. This may have caused us to overfill the pans and make more of a cake than a bar, but it was still delicious.

    If you make this recipe, I guarantee you won’t be able to keep yourself from seconds; it was a fluffy pumpkin and spice filled wonder with a glaze of white frosting, reminiscent of the seemingly always premature snow of fall.

    Sargent Choice Pumpkin Bars
    Recipe adapted from Bon Appetit Magazine

    Yields 24 servings

    Ingredients:

    • 2 cups whole wheat flour
    • ¾ cup packed light brown sugar
    • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
    • 2 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
    • 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin
    • 4 large eggs
    • ½ cup vegetable oil

    ____________________________

    • 6 ounces light cream cheese, room temperature
    • 1 cup powdered sugar
    • 1/3 cup butter, room temperature

    Directions

    Bars

    1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F.
    2. Grease 15 ½ x 10 ½ x 1-inch baking sheet.
    3. Stir first 8 ingredients in large bowl to blend.
    4. Add pumpkin, eggs and oil and beat until blended
    5. Spread batter in prepared pan.
    6. Bake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Cool in pan.

    Frosting

    1. Beat cream cheese, powdered sugar and butter in medium bowl to blend. Spread frosting over cake in thin later. Cut cake into bars and serve. Enjoy!
    1 slice
    Calories 180
    Fat 9 g
    Saturated Fat 3 g
    Protein 3 g
    Carbohydrates 22 g
    Fiber 2 g

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test Kitchen: Quinoa Cakes with Black Bean Salad

    By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and watch the Red Sox win the World Series.

    First things first, GO SOX!! This week during our Test Kitchen we all got to experience the glorious 6-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals, and it was quite the time.  The lovely recipes that we got to try out were just the icing on the cake.  Our two recipes were created by Executive Chef Adam Pagan from the 100 Bay State Road dining hall, and we were all excited to see how they would turn out.  Our first recipe was for a quinoa cake with zucchini.  If you haven’t heard of quinoa, here’s a quick run down: it is a South American grain, a complete protein, and is loaded with iron and fiber.  Basically, it’s great and easy to find in any supermarket.

    Making this recipe, we found that it works best to shred the zucchini instead of chopping it, as it leads to a better texture in the end result.  Also, I got a little crazy with the pepper grinder when adding it in, but the extra spiciness was found to be a good thing (this could also be accomplished through cayenne pepper or another spice if you don’t like black pepper).  We also decided that we didn’t want our quinoa cakes fried in oil, and instead we decided to bake them.  We baked them at 400°F for 25 minutes, flipping at the halfway mark.  This reduces the fat in the cakes and also makes the flavors more pronounced.

    Along side our quinoa cakes we made a yummy black bean salad.  It was the easiest thing in the world to make, just lots of chopping and then lots of mixing.  The flavors complemented the cakes, and were also just great by themselves.  One student said she “couldn’t wait to put this in a burrito.”  One tip was discovered, and that is to rinse the fresh cilantro super well.  If you don’t do this, you might end up with grit in your salad from how it was grown.

    I was so impressed by these recipes that I thought I would reach out to Chef Pagan and see how he gets inspired to create new dishes.  He says that he loves to eat, so food is always on his mind.  He said that he likes cooking Sargent Choice recipes, as it helps debunk the allegations that in order for food to taste good you have to use a lot of sugar or added fat.  Chef Pagan has been cooking professionally for 18 years, and looks forward to many more I am sure.  Hope you all try these recipes and love it, and go Sox!

    Quinoa Cake Ingredients:

    • 1 tbsp olive oil
    • 1 c. uncooked quinoa (mixing colors if you want, it makes them prettier)
    • ¼ c. diced onion
    • 1 small zucchini, shredded or finely chopped
    • 1 clove garlic, minced
    • 1 tsp sea salt
    • ½ tsp black pepper
    • ¼ c. water mixed with 1 egg
    • 5-6 tbsp whole wheat flour

    Quinoa Cake Directions:

    1. Place quinoa in a fine-mesh strainer and rinse very well several times in cold water. Drain well.
    2. Boil 1 ½ c. of water in a pot, add quinoa.  Cover with lid and simmer on low heat for 15 minutes until all water is absorbed.
    3. Mix together all ingredients in large bowl.  The consistency should be just right to form patties.  It will be a little sticky, you might need to add more flour if it is falling apart.
    4. Heat a few tbsp. oil in a skillet on medium heat.
    5. Drop patties into oil and sauté on each side until golden brown.
    6. Let rest on a paper towel, serve immediately.

    Black Bean Salad Ingredients:

    • 1 15-oz can of black beans, rinsed and drained
    • 1 ½ c. frozen corn, thawed
    • 3 green onions (white and green parts), sliced thinly
    • 1 avocado, diced
    • 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
    • 3 medium plum tomatoes, seeded and diced
    • ½ bunch fresh cilantro, leaves stripped and minced
    • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice (about 1 lime)
    • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
    • ½ tsp salt
    • ¼ tsp black pepper

    Black Bean Salad Directions:

    1. Fold all ingredients together in a large bowl.  Refrigerate if not serving immediately.

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test Kitchen: Chocolate Chip Cherry Cookies and Zucchini Sticks

    By Rachel Priebe, Nutritional Sciences student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

    This week at the test kitchen, I was more than a little distracted.  Its right in the middle of midterm season, always a stressor, and it was the night of the first Red Sox World Series game.  But I was able to put all that aside when I found out we were making cookies!  Cookies, especially healthy ones like these, always make me feel a little better so I was excited to make these sweet treats.

    This recipe is super easy to follow, and is made healthy both through its reduced sugar and butter content, and through the addition of whole wheat flour and dried cherries.  One substitution that we found made the cookies more chocolatey was the use of regular chocolate chips instead of minis, as it made the flavor experience even more intense.

    Tonight at the test kitchen it was special because we were making two recipes.  While the cookies were baking, we got to experience what is like to create a new recipe on the fly with Chef Sasha Stein Meyerson.  Sasha is a graduate from Le Cordon Bleu culinary school, and is also a first year grad student in the Nutrition program here at BU.  She was tasked with creating a recipe to go with a dip from Cindy’s Kitchen, which was a creamy dill flavored sauce. Sasha said that the first thing she does when making a recipe is gather all the ingredients that she thinks she might use, and spread them out in front of her.

    She decided to make a baked zucchini stick, breaded with fresh herbs and whole wheat bread crumbs.  We tried several combinations of herbs, and decided that the more the better and included cilantro, basil, parsley, and dill.  These flavors really complemented the dip’s creaminess, and made the flavor of the zucchini pop.  One helpful tip she gave was the “wet hand/dry hand” method for breading: toss the zucchini sticks in flour and then egg with one hand, and then use your other hand to coat the sticks in the bread crumbs.  This helps avoid breading your fingertips!  Sadly, the final recipe still has to be recorded and sent to me but as soon as I receive it I will post it for all of our readers!

    In addition to these two terrific snacks, we were also rewarded with a Red Sox win!!

    Chocolate Chip Cherry Cookies
    Adapted from Cooking Light

    Yields 30 cookies

    Ingredients:

    • 1 c. 100% whole white wheat flour
    • 1/3 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
    • ½ tsp baking powder
    • ¼ tsp baking soda
    • ¼ tsp salt
    • ¾ c. granulated sugar
    • 1/3 c. unsalted butter
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1 large egg
    • 2/3 c. dried cherries
    • 3 tbsp semi-sweet mini chips or chopped regular chips

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to350
    2. Measure out the cherries into a bowl and cover with hot water. Let sit while mixing other ingredients.
    3. Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife.
    4. Combine flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and  salt in a small bowl; whisk together.
    5. Place sugar and butter in a large bowl; beat until creamy.
    6. Add vanilla and egg; beat well.  Once combined, slowly add in the flour mixture while continuing to mix.
    7. Drain cherries and add to batter, along with chocolate chips.
    8. Drop mixture by tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray.
    9. Bake at 350 for 12-15 minutes, or just until set. Cool on pan for a few minutes, then remove from pan and cool completely on wire racks.

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Test Kitchen: Spinach Pot Stickers

    by Jessica Crowley, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

    Every Wednesday Karen Jacobs EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA hosts the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen in Stuvi 2 Apt. 2302 from 8-11pm. She invites the BU community into her home to test new Sargent Choice recipes while we cook, drink tea, and play board games.

    Last week was my first time representing Sargent Choice at the Sargent Choice Test Kitchen, but I am no rookie to the Test Kitchen. I visited Karen Jacobs’ residence in Stuvi 2 a few times last year, and if any of you know Karen Jacobs, it is almost impossible not to have a good time in her presence.

    Karen greeted me with a cup of tea as we waited for more guests to arrive. It seemed that midterms took a toll on her head count, but no need to worry, company soon arrived. That’s the wonderful thing about Karen’s Test Kitchen, the hustle-and-bustle of our everyday world seems to thin-out at the high altitudes of Stuvi 2, giving rise to culinary therapy. Food is intertwined in our culture and Karen Jacobs seems to understand and respect that.

    Everyone was very excited to make the spinach pot stickers, more affectionately known as dumplings. Karen is familiar with the recipe and has made it many times, so she made a few adjustments, excluding the rice and cornstarch and steaming instead of frying. I cannot speak to if these changes improved the recipe, because I have never had it any other way. Those of you reading, who have kitchens, will have to test it for me.

    Karen expedited the process, by soaking the mushrooms ahead of time, so we began by chopping the mushrooms and water chestnuts, while others grated the gingerroot and garlic. A few of us had the opportunity to show off our culinary technique by separating an egg yolk and white. Then, we combined the ingredients for the filling: mushroom caps, water chestnuts, gingerroot, sesame oil, spinach, egg white, and garlic, and mixed well.

    We began filling the wonton wrappers. It was interesting how we all chose to fold our dumplings differently; some chose to fold them into triangles, while others folded them into rectangles, and one exceptional member of the Test Kitchen community made beautifully crafted, origami-inspired dumplings, which was very impressive. We loaded them into steamer baskets, which were an art form on their own and waited.

    In the meantime, the Apples to Apples representatives for the BU community set up and briefly explained the rules of the game. They came with a number of prizes to give out, including: t-shirts, tumblers, games, and more. But, as soon as the dumplings were done, so was talk about Apples to Apples. Everyone dug into the steaming hot dumplings and with a little soy sauce, they were perfect. Apples to Apples eventually resumed and all-in-all the Test Kitchen was a great success!

     

     

    Sargent Choice Spinach Pot Stickers

    Yield: 30 pot stickers

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup boiling water
    • 1 8-ounce package dried shitake mushrooms
    • 1/2 cup cooked brown, long-grain rice
    • 1/3 cup finely chopped, canned water chestnuts
    • 1 tbsp. cornstarch
    • 1 tbsp. minced, peeled gingerroot
    • 1 tsp. dark sesame oil
    • 1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed, drained, and squeezed dry
    • 1 egg white
    • 1 garlic clove
    • 30 wonton wrappers
    • 2 tsp. cornstarch
    • 4 tsp. vegetable oil, divided
    • 1 cup water, divided

    Directions

    1. Combine boiling water and mushrooms in a bowl; cover and let stand 30 minutes.  Drain; discard stems, and mince caps.
    2. Combine mushroom caps, rice, water chestnuts, cornstarch, gingerroot, sesame oil, spinach, egg white, and garlic. Stir well.
    3. Spoon 1 tablespoon of filling mixture into center of each wrapper.
    4. Moisten edges of wrapper with water, and bring 2 opposite corners to center and seal.  Bring other two corners to center and seal. Pinch 4 edges together firmly to seal.  Place pot stickers on a large baking sheet sprinkled with cornstarch.  Cover loosely with a towel to keep them from drying out.
    5. Heat 2 teaspoons vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat.  Place half of pot stickers in bottom of skillet; cook 3 minutes or until bottoms are lightly browned.  Add ½ cup of water to skillet; cover and cook 3 minutes or until liquid is absorbed.  Place pot stickers on serving platter. Enjoy.

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website

    Events!!

    by Ellie Schulman, Film and Television Student, College of Communication

    Hi everyone.

    I just had to let you know about a couple of really great events coming up tomorrow (Thursday, 10/17).

    First, from 12-1pm, SCNC dietitian Lisa Ferreira will be giving a talk about eating gluten-free, titled “Is a Gluten Free Diet Right for Me?” She’ll explain what all the hype is about and under what circumstances someone should actually be maintaining a gluten-free diet. It will be located at Boston University Occupational Health Center room (930 Commonwealth Avenue, West Pleasant Street entrance).

    Second, there is a roundtable discussion about Make a Difference Monday, starting at 6pm. I know a lot of people will want to ask BU Sustainability questions about the program, so now is your chance! It will be very casual so be sure to show up and ask your questions. The discussion will be held in the CAS building, room 227. Here’s a quick blurb about the event to give you some ideas about when you might want to ask before you walk in: “BU Dining Sustainability will talk about what food sustainability at BU means to you, what you want to see and why…Think local sourcing, vegan and vegetarian, animal rights, nutrition and more.”

    Check out the Facebook page for the event here.

    Thanks for your time, I hope to see you there!

     

     

    Disclaimer: The Sargent Choice blog includes links to other websites only as information to consumers, not as medical advice. When you access an external website, keep in mind that Sargent Choice has no control over its content. Sargent Choice is not responsible for the content found at any of the sites, nor do any links imply endorsement or promotion of the company/organization, its content, services, therapeutic treatment options, or products. Accordingly, you visit any site at your own risk. Sargent Choice is also not responsible for the policies and practices of these sites, such as their Privacy Policy, use of “cookies”, etc. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of each site that you visit through a link on our website