Politics in the Time of Global Pandemic

On Wednesday, June 24, alongside Prof. Mahrukh Doctor from the University of Hull, I participated in a panel discussion entitled “Comparing Patchwork Responses to Pandemic,” the first of a virtual nine-week lecture series on the theme of “Politics in the Time of Global Pandemic,” co-sponsored by the Ford Hall Forum and the WGBH Forum and presented by Suffolk University’s Political Science & Legal Studies Department. In my remarks, I discussed how to assess the legitimacy of governments’ crisis responses in the US at both the federal and state levels and in Europe at the EU and member state levels. The panel was moderated by Prof. Sebastián Royo from Suffolk University.

A recording of the event will be available here once it is processed by WGBH.

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Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy Presentation for the Bruno Kreisky Forum

I had the opportunity recently, in lieu of a scheduled visit to Vienna, to record a video presentation for the Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue on new book, Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone, in which I examine the interrelationship between democratic legitimacy at the European level and the ongoing Eurozone crisis that began in 2010. I discuss the responses of various EU actors to the COVID-19 pandemic and lessons learned from the Eurozone crisis. 

See below for the full video presentation or watch it on YouTubeThe video has a short introduction in German by Eva Nowotny, former Austrian Ambassador in Washington and Curator of the Kreisky Forum, and then I proceed in English (2:10).  

Legitimacy in a time of Covid: Lessons from the Eurozone Crisis

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020, I presented a talk via Zoom entitled, “Legitimacy in a  time of Covid: Lessons from the Eurozone Crisis” for the  Schuman Center at the European University Institute’s seminar series on Covid 19. Drawing on the themes of my recent book – Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers – my presentation focussed on the problems of legitimacy during the Covid-19 crisis, with examples from EU institutional actors as well as from a wide range of countries.

Corona-Crisis: Views from across the Atlantic

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On Tuesday, May 26, I was a speaker, along with Adam S. Posen (The Peterson Institute for International Economics) and Jeffry Frieden (Harvard University), at the Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw) webinar  “Corona-Crisis: Views from across the Atlantic” on the economic impact of the crisis and policy developments in the US and Europe. The panel discussion was moderated by wiiw economist Michael Landesmann.

The panel addressed the following questions:

  • How does the unfolding Covid-19 crisis compare so far between the US and Europe?
  • How does the EMU/EU governance structure constrain monetary and fiscal responses compared to the US?
  • Which failures in policy can be/could have been avoided?
  • Which social and political outcomes do you expect on both sides of the Atlantic?
  • How will the US and European responses affect global economic and political relations?

[Link to the webinar recording]

European Integration and the Future of EU-UK Relations in Times of COVID-19

On Monday, May 4, I participated in an interview  with Sarah Wolff for the 1st episode of the NEXTEUK Virtual Seminar Series at Queen Mary University in London. In the interview, on the subject of European integration and the future of EU-UK relations in times of COVID-19, I talked about populism, lessons from the Eurozone crisis, the responses of the EU and member-states, and finally what the EU can do. Enjoy!

Europe’s (Euro) Crisis of Legitimacy

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On October 11, I gave a talk on “Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone” at McGill University’s Jean Monnet Center. The lecture was recorded and is available on YouTube (see below).

Here is an abstract of the talk:

The policies and processes adopted by the EU in the face of the euro crisis have in fact exacerbated long-standing problems of EU legitimacy and solidarity. Democratic legitimacy has suffered because Eurozone policies have failed to produce good outcomes and because EU citizens have even less say than ever over those policies. Indeed, the excessively intergovernmental processes of Eurozone crisis governance—in which the European Central Bank acts, the member-state leaders in the European Council decide, the European Parliament is side-lined, and the European Commission serves as a secretariat—have unbalanced the EU’s long-standing “democratic” settlement in which all three latter institutions pulled their weight. By “governing by the rules” and “ruling by the numbers,” EU institutional actors seem to have forgotten that democratic legitimacy demands not just rules to follow but policies that both work and appeal to the citizens.

Germany’s Role in the European Union and the Transatlantic Relationship: 1998-2018

On Oct 7, 2018 I participated on the panel “Germany’s Role in the European Union and the Transatlantic Relationship:1998-2018” for the Twentieth Anniversary Celebration of the Center for German and European Studies at Brandeis University: Reflecting on the Past, Envisioning the Future: The Center for German & European Studies at Brandeis turns 20. The panel explored how Germany’s role in Europe shifted between 1998 and 2018, what it means, what effects Brexit and right-wing populism are having, how the EU is dealing with these challenges, and what will likely happen in the coming years. A link to the program can be found here.

European Union Studies Association Lifetime Achievement Award

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I have learned that I will be receiving the European Union Studies Association (EUSA) Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2019 EUSA International Biennial Conference in Denver next May.

The plenary honoring Schmidt at the conference will include Tanja Börzel (Freie Universität Berlin), Matthias Matthijs (Johns Hopkins University), Kalypso Nicolaïdis (University of Oxford), Fritz Scharpf (Max Planck Institute and recipient of the 2007 EUSA Lifetime Achievement Award), George Ross (Université de Montreal and recipient of 2017 EUSA Lifetime Achievement Award), and Alberta Sbragia (University of Pittsburgh and recipient of 2013 EUSA Lifetime Achievement Award).

More information about the prizes can be found here: https://www.eustudies.org/about/eusa-prizes

The Lifetime Achievement Award honors a scholar in the field of EU studies whose lifetime of research and writing have been important, enduring, and widely felt influences on EU scholarship.

Keynote in Finland

finlandI was at the University of Tampere, Finland, August 27-29 to deliver a keynote presentation entitled “Theorizing the Power of Ideas and Discourse in Governance beyond the Nation-State” for the Sixth Conference on “Power & Governance: Forms, Dynamics, Consequences” at the Institute for Advanced Social Research (IASR). 

The agenda of the conference was to probe whether something general can be said about the forms, dynamics and consequences of power and to study what the alternative ways to approach the issue are and what kind of irreconcilable contradictions there are. Plenary sessions were held on the following topics: power relations, global governance, power and knowledge, and critique of power.