Book Presentation at SASE 2020 Virtual Conference

On Saturday, July 18,  I presented my book, Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy:  Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone,  for an “Author meets Critics” session at the 2020 – Virtual Conference: Development Today: Accumulation, Surveillance, Redistribution. The event was originally scheduled to take place in Amsterdam.

My book examines the interrelationship between democratic legitimacy at the European level and the ongoing Eurozone crisis that began in 2010. Using the lens of democratic theory, it examines the crisis in terms of the policies, politics, and processes surrounding it, and the nature and interactions of elements that scholars and policy analysts tend to deal with separately. These include the political-economic structures and policies that contribute to the economic (output) performance, the political institutions and interactions that affect the (input) politics, and the governance rules and networks that make up the (throughput) processes. 

The session was moderated by Eleni Tsingou. Discussants were Cornel Ban, John W. Cioffi, Amandine Crespy, and Jonathan Zeitlin.

 

Politics in the Time of Global Pandemic

On Wednesday, June 24, alongside Prof. Mahrukh Doctor from the University of Hull, I participated in a panel discussion entitled “Comparing Patchwork Responses to Pandemic,” the first of a virtual nine-week lecture series on the theme of “Politics in the Time of Global Pandemic,” co-sponsored by the Ford Hall Forum and the WGBH Forum and presented by Suffolk University’s Political Science & Legal Studies Department. In my remarks, I discussed how to assess the legitimacy of governments’ crisis responses in the US at both the federal and state levels and in Europe at the EU and member state levels. The panel was moderated by Prof. Sebastián Royo from Suffolk University.

A recording of the event will be available here once it is processed by WGBH.

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Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy Presentation for the Bruno Kreisky Forum

I had the opportunity recently, in lieu of a scheduled visit to Vienna, to record a video presentation for the Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue on new book, Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone, in which I examine the interrelationship between democratic legitimacy at the European level and the ongoing Eurozone crisis that began in 2010. I discuss the responses of various EU actors to the COVID-19 pandemic and lessons learned from the Eurozone crisis. 

See below for the full video presentation or watch it on YouTubeThe video has a short introduction in German by Eva Nowotny, former Austrian Ambassador in Washington and Curator of the Kreisky Forum, and then I proceed in English (2:10).  

Legitimacy in a time of Covid: Lessons from the Eurozone Crisis

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020, I presented a talk via Zoom entitled, “Legitimacy in a  time of Covid: Lessons from the Eurozone Crisis” for the  Schuman Center at the European University Institute’s seminar series on Covid 19. Drawing on the themes of my recent book – Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers – my presentation focussed on the problems of legitimacy during the Covid-19 crisis, with examples from EU institutional actors as well as from a wide range of countries.

Corona-Crisis: Views from across the Atlantic

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On Tuesday, May 26, I was a speaker, along with Adam S. Posen (The Peterson Institute for International Economics) and Jeffry Frieden (Harvard University), at the Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw) webinar  “Corona-Crisis: Views from across the Atlantic” on the economic impact of the crisis and policy developments in the US and Europe. The panel discussion was moderated by wiiw economist Michael Landesmann.

The panel addressed the following questions:

  • How does the unfolding Covid-19 crisis compare so far between the US and Europe?
  • How does the EMU/EU governance structure constrain monetary and fiscal responses compared to the US?
  • Which failures in policy can be/could have been avoided?
  • Which social and political outcomes do you expect on both sides of the Atlantic?
  • How will the US and European responses affect global economic and political relations?

[Link to the webinar recording]

The Varied Responses of EU Institutional Actors to the COVID Crisis

A man wearing a face mask walks past the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on April 9, 2020. ©Reuters/Yves Herman
A man wearing a face mask walks past the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on April 9, 2020. ©Reuters/Yves Herman

On Wednesday, April 29, I served as moderator for the Zoom videoconference: “The Varied Responses of EU Institutional Actors to the COVID Crisis.” Panelists included Sergey Lagodinsky, Green Member of the European Parliament, and André Sapir, Professor of Economics at ULB and Associate of the Breugel think-tank. The event was co-sponsored by Harvard’s Center for European Studies and the Belfer Center’s Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship at Harvard’s Kennedy School. 

Dilemmas for Democratic Legitimacy in the Coronavirus Crisis

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On Tuesday, April 28, I gave a presentation entitled “Dilemmas for Democratic Legitimacy in the corona virus crisis, with lessons learned from the Eurozone crisis” as part of a panel on “Democratic Legitimacy and Public Debate in times of Pandemic” for the Zoom video-teleconference “Social Movements and Political Mobilisation in Times of Global Pandemic,” organized by the Copenhagen Center for Political Mobilization and Social Movement Studies (CoMMonS) at the University of Copenhagen. You can view all of the presentations on the Copenhagen Centre for Political Mobilisation and Social Movement Studies Facebook page. You can view my presentation below:

The Euro at 20: Past, Present, and Future at Middlebury College

On Friday, October 25, I was at Middlebury College in Vermont, for the annual International Political Economy symposium on “The Euro at 20: Past, Present, and Future.”  I was one of three keynote speakers, presenting on “Europe’s (euro) Crisis of Legitimacy and the Populist Backlash.” The other speakers were historian Harold James (Princeton), and economist Thierry Warin (Skema Business School).

 

Webinar: RECONNECT Horizon 2020 project

On Wednesday Oct 23, I was the featured speaker for a webinar of the RECONNECT Horizon 2020 project.  The event had approximately 100 registrations, with approximately following the event live.  Using PowerPoint, I presented my forthcoming book with Oxford University Press: Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy:  Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone.

In the webinar I discuss how the EU’s (euro) crisis of legitimacy centers on problems related to (a lack of) policy effectiveness, political responsiveness, and procedural quality.  I also contend that in pursuit of legitimacy as much as in response to deteriorating economics and increasing political volatility, EU institutional actors—ECB, Council, Commission, and EP—incrementally reinterpreted the rules and recalibrated the numbers ‘by stealth,’ that is, without admitting it in their public discourse.  To theorize about such processes of ideational innovation and discursive legitimation during the Eurozone crisis, I use the neo-institutionalist framework of discursive institutionalism. Prof. Kolja Raube (Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, KU Leuven) served as discussant. The webinar was moderated by Alex Andrione-Moylan (Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, KU Leuven).

Europe’s Travails: Forging a French-German Response in an Era of Transatlantic Disequilibrium

On Monday, October 22, I took part in a European Economic Policy Forum event at Harvard’s Center for European Studies. The discussion, entitled “Europe’s Travails: Forging a French-German Response in an Era of Transatlantic Disequilibrium,” was sponsored by the European Economic Policy Forum with the support o the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States. The panel, consisting of Henrik Enderlein, President and Professor of Political Economy, Hertie School; Jean Pisani-Ferry,Senior Professor of Economics and Public Management, Hertie School; Senior Fellow, Bruegel; Jeffrey Frankel,James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth, Harvard Kennedy School, and myself, explored the implications of the divisions in Europe over issues such as migration and border control, fiscal policy and rule of law, among others, on le couple franco-allemand.