Weekly Round-Up, 5-26-17

Helloooo scholars! Today we’re going to distract you from the lateness of this post with the (ahem) greatness of these links. Read on:

  • Dr. Du Bois and Miss Ovington closed at the Robey Theatre last Sunday, May 21, at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. The production explores the dynamics between W.E.B. Du Bois and Mary Ovington, who together would go on to help form the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People).
  • Every portrait, a different story: Six portraits of Jane Austen will be shown at an exhibit entitled The Mysterious Miss Austen at the Winchester Discovery Center in Hampshire in the UK.

This portrait's story: disappointing, according to curator Kathryn Sutherland. James Andrews, Jane Austen (1869), watercolor (Private collection, courtesy of the 19th Century Rare Book and Photograph Shop, Stevenson, Maryland)

This portrait’s story: disappointing, according to curator Kathryn Sutherland. James Andrews, Jane Austen (1869), watercolor (Private collection, courtesy of the 19th Century Rare Book and Photograph Shop, Stevenson, Maryland)

  • Where do babies come from? Aristotle, da Vinci–everybody’s got a hot take for Edward Dolnick’s recently published book The Seeds of Life: From Aristotle to da Vinci, from Sharks Teeth to Frogs Pants, the Long and Strange Quest to Discover Where Babies Come From. One belief the author examines: “The prevailing wisdom was that God not only created all living creatures during the first week of Genesis, but that he created all generations of all creatures back then. By this logic, Eves egg (or Adams semen) contained miniature humans who in turn contained miniature humans, and so on like an infinite set of nesting dolls.”
  • Dorothy Fortenberrys Species Native to California is an update ofChekhov’s The Cherry Orchard for Trump’s America. The production runs through June 11 at the Atwater Village Theatre.
  • Aristotle got it wrong when he proposed that there are five senses; in fact, Barry C. Smith of the Centre for the Study of the Senses at the University of London claims that there are at least 22 and maybe as many as 33.

That should do it! We hope the summer months continue to treat you well.

Post a Comment

Your email address is never shared. Required fields are marked *