Cognitive research on study habits, in the NYTimes

In an article for the The New York Times, Benedict Carey examines the recent research that suggests that some of the received wisdom on study habits may be counter-productive:

In recent years, cognitive scientists have shown that a few simple techniques can reliably improve what matters most: how much a student learns from studying. [...] But they directly contradict much of the common wisdom about good study habits, and they have not caught on.

For instance, instead of sticking to one study location, simply alternating the room where a person studies improves retention. So does studying distinct but related skills or concepts in one sitting, rather than focusing intensely on a single thing.

(from “Forget What You Know About Good Study Habits,” published September 6, 2010, retrieved September 8, 2010.)

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