Posts by: CAS Core Curriculum

Ancient Gilgamesh tablet showcasing earliest form of literature returned to Iraq

Officials believe the artifact looted during the 1991 Gulf War was illegally imported into the U.S. in 2003, then sold and put on display in a Washington museum.     https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/ancient-gilgamesh-tablet-showcasing-earliest-form-literature-returned-rcna8001

Hidden sketch revealed beneath Rembrandt’s The Night Watch

Who knew chalk could talk? Amsterdam restorers certainly did, as they discovered Rembrandt’s original chalk outline of The Night Watch. “You may ask why is this so important? Well, it gives us the feeling we can peek over Rembrandts shoulder while he was working on The Night Watch.” Read it here:Hidden sketch revealed beneath Rembrandt’s […]

Age of Viking settlement revealed using trees and astrophysics

Samus Bellamy writes on dig site evidence that can place the date on the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland that was discovered six decades ago. To find out the details and see how he dissects a New York Times article on the story, check out this link.

A RECKONING IN BOSTON Film Screening Comes to the BBF

What was supposed to be a documentary about Dorchester residents enrolled in a humanities course turned into an exploration of racism, violence, and justice in Boston James Rutenbeck, a white filmmaker from the suburbs, had the intention to simply document the Clemente Course in Dorchester, and to better understand the impact of this academic curriculum […]

Editor’s Introduction to The Journal, Issue 30

The online edition of the thirtieth issue of The Journal of the Core Curriculum has just been published. To help place the issue in a context of editorial goals and of the community involvement that went into its production, we hereby present the Editor’s Note from the front matter, written by the editor-in-chief: I am […]

5 Misconceptions About Climate Change

In this episode of Science Matters from The Origins Podcast, the host, theoretical physicist, lecturer, and author, Lawrence M. Krauss, focuses on 5 big misconceptions about climate change, as well as the science behind climate change. In their first episode of 2021, Lawrence addresses misconceptions such as, “human productions of CO2 cannot significantly impact the […]

Article about Dante’s Descendant Taking Part in a Mock Retrial

Check out this fascinating article about Dante’s descendant taking part in a mockretrialto see if Dante’s conviction in 1302 was just! Click this link to read!  

Voltaire and the Land of Snow

On this snowy day, our thoughts turn to this mention of snow in North America, on page 58 of Wooton’s translation ofCandide: ‘You know England; are they as mad there as in France?’ ‘It’s a different type of madness,’ said Martin. ‘You know that these two nations are at war over some acres of snow […]

A NYT Article about “The Dancer Who Made Beethoven’s Ninth Happen”

In this NYT article, Patricia Morrisroe beautifully describes the life of one of the greatest dancers of their generation, Louis Antoine Duport, and the dramatic event of the performance of Beethoven’s Ninth, a powerful choral symphony. To read about this “temperamental impresario” and the premiere of a concert he managed, click here.

Christopher Ricks on Milton and Blasphemy

Christopher Ricks, an esteemed professor in the Editorial Institute and the Core Curriculum here at BU, recently gave a lecture to the CC201 students on Milton and Blasphemy. This lecture discusses the incredible sensitivities of the word blasphemy, what it means to blaspheme, and how anti-blasphemy laws still impact our society today. He also discusses […]