Posts by: vpriest

The Challenges of Coping with Chronic Education while in Higher Education

College classes and living on one’s own for the first time is stressful. Imagine having to cope with a chronic illness at the same time. In a recent article published in Cognoscenti, Laurie Edwards goes over the challenges that face college students suffering from chronic illness in today’s tertiary education system. While services for students […]

Ibn al-Haytham on Scientific Methodology

Egyptian scientist, Ibn al-Haytham (AD 950-1040), is hailed as the father of modern optics and experimental physics. Also, he’s apparently one of the first to make a statement on scientific methodology: The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them, […]

Another Facet of William Blake

Who was William Blake? Ask a CC202 student and they’ll tell you he was an English Romantic poet. They’re right but that’s not all. Blake was also a talented artist and many of his subjects will appear familiar to keen-eyed core students. We thought we’d take a moment to share a bit of this lesser […]

On Marshall Berman, Marxist Intellectual of New York

Last fall, Marshall Berman, a Jewish American philosopher, Marxist humanist writer and professor of political science at The City College of New York, passed away. Vladislav Davidzon writes about his late teacher in Tablet Magazine, painting a portrait of him as a brilliant nonconformist and engaging teacher: In hindsight, I am impressed by how neatly […]

Dogs are not People

In a recent book, How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain, Dr. Gregory Bernes discusses his study (previously featured in a core blog post here) in which MRI brain scans of dogs were explored and showed human like emotions. However, not all dog enthusiasts have wholeheartedly accepted Bernes […]

Event: The Co-Evolution of the Geosphere and Biosphere

The Co-Evolution of the Geosphere and Biosphere A talk by Robert M. Hazen Senior Staff Scientist, Geophysical Laboratory Executive Director, Deep Carbon Observatory Washington, DC Hosted by Scott Morr Part of the Systems Biology Seminar Series Sponsored by the Bioinformatics Graduate Program Boston University Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 12:45 PM Located at LSEB 103 […]

Beethoven’s 9th Symphony

Today students in CC202 will be treated with a lecture on Beethoven by the Boston Conservatory’s Professor Elizabeth Seitz. Here are two excellent performances of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony: Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Abbado conduting the Berlin Philharmonic All are welcome to come to the lecture in CAS B12 at 12:30 pm today to enjoy […]

CC106 Integrated Forum: Bird Song

Today, February 13th, at 2 PM in CAS 211 three biologists will meet for an integrated forum on bird song. Although the forum is for the CC106 class, anyone is welcome. Professor Tim Gardner will discuss the physiology of sound and hearing, Professor Frederick Wasserman will discuss the behavioral function of bird vocalizations and Jelle […]

Was Shakespeare a scientist?

  A recent article by Dan Falk of The Telegraph puts forth this important question by highlighting that:  The genius from Stratford-upon-Avon has worn many hats over the years, with imaginative scholars casting him as a closet Catholic, a mainstream Protestant, an ardent capitalist, a Marxist, a misogynist, a feminist, a homosexual, a legal clerk […]

Frank Hurley: Color Photographs of the Antarctic in 1915

Color photography has been around far longer than often assumed. Attempts had been made as early as the 1840s and in the mid 19th century several techniques were developed, although no affordable methods were readily available until the mid 20th century. One early technique was the Paget process, most memorably used by Australian photographer James […]