Category: Uncategorized

From Vox: Trumps grab ‘em by the p***y line anticipated by 600 years

That “Canterbury” contains “Cant-“, and that “cant” shares a precarious assonance with another word, suggests that one of our most literate bards and bawds, Chaucer, might have anticipated Trump’s latest perversion. This possibility was recently illuminated by Constance Grady at Vox. Or, less likely, Trump might have been paying tribute in his comment to some […]

From The Guardian: Stop pushing the same ‘classic’ books, trust modern writing

One reason why it is necessary to keep “pushing” the “classic books” is that they strengthen the things that remain. For one of our present monomanias is for “innovation,” against which the classical works provide much needed traction.Without it, it is easy to feel one is living a chopping-block mode of existence, bound to cut […]

From The Atlantic: How Banning Books Marginalizes Children

In this corner, the cries for diversity are heard so regularly, that one can’t help but to feel they are unified into some kind of chant. Meanwhile, the coroner is busy trying to figure out why a tiny but vicious minority of those marching is taking aim at the canonical paladins, otherwise called Dead White […]

From New Republic: Does Karl Marx still matter?

In the opening line of Michael Kazin’s article Prophet and Loss, the author asks, “Does Karl Marx still matter?” He directs the question to those readers interested in Gareth Stedman Jones’ new book Karl Marx: Greatness and Illusion, and addresses the question‌ in a book review-esque article. Both Kazin and Jones acknowledge Marx’s failures to […]

From The Spectator: Making Nietzsche New.

For several reasons, Philosophy departments in the United States have traditionally recommended a safe distance from Nietzsche. One is the prose style, which shows a penchant less for analysis and more for Dionysus. Another is hygiene: the charge of anti-Semitism has stuck to him like a bad scent, despite the attempts by expositors, most notably […]

From the New York Times: No, the Internet Has Not Killed the Printed Book.

“No, the Internet Has Not Killed the Printed Book. Most People Still Prefer Them,” Daniel Victor of the New York Times assures us in the title of his latest. And also invites us to ponder whether the slip in grammar might not indicate that the Internet has killed or made moribund something else: literacy. Citing […]

From the BBC: “Syria’s secret library”

Erin Rubin (Core ’08, CAS ’10) brings to our attention this article at the BBC website, about “Syria’s secret library“: When a place has been besieged for years and hunger stalks the streets, you might have thought people would have little interest in books. But enthusiasts have stocked an underground library in Syria with volumes […]

Postcards to the Core: From London, July 2016

Our latest postcard comes to CAS 119 from the North End — for you see, Prof. Stephanie Nelson had been in London, had visited the National Portrait Gallery there, but didn’t get the chance to find a post box and drop the memento postcard she bought for us into the mail before she had to […]

Study philosophy for better welders?

When Marco Rubio declared “We need more welders and less philosophers,” he was greeted with quite the bit of applause. This push for vocational work (shall we call it a populist appeal?) has become a central thread in the public conversation of this election season; this is likely motivated by continuing concerns about economic recovery […]

The Quest for Wu-Wei

As the core office is situated on a college campus, we have, ever so often, heard variations of this unfortunate conversation: Timmy: “How’d you do on the paper, Josh?” Josh: “I did alright. You?” Timmy: “Oh you know, just a 98. I’m surprised though. I started the book yesterday, watched TV until 1am. Wrote it […]