Category: Uncategorized

A work in progress

A personal thought to those finishing the Core this semester: you are a work in progress. We were recently chatting with Christopher McMullen, a Core alum and Academic Adviser, and the conversation winded down to how the Core Curriculum merely reveals the tip of the tip of the tip of the iceberg – an introductory […]

The Challenges of Coping with Chronic Education while in Higher Education

College classes and living on one’s own for the first time is stressful. Imagine having to cope with a chronic illness at the same time. In a recent article published in Cognoscenti, Laurie Edwards goes over the challenges that face college students suffering from chronic illness in today’s tertiary education system. While services for students […]

Rx Books

In the past year, Great Britain’s National Health Service has launched a new “Books on Prescription” program for people suffering from anxiety, depression, and other behavioral health problems. As an alternative to traditional pharmaco- or psycho- therapy, doctors are now recommending self-help books to patients to equip them with the skills to lift themselves out […]

Classical Self-Help

Please read Rod Dreher’s piece, How Dante Saved My Life, for the March/April 2014 issue of The American Conservative. It is a beautiful reminder that the works on a canonical reading list are not only politically and philosophically applicable, but are often also spiritually and personally invaluable. 

When Humanities and Natural Sciences Meet… In Outer Space

  What do black holes, the mysterious cosmological matter-sucking bodies at the centers of galaxies, have in common with yin and yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept? Check out this vid.  

Noise vs. Sound

Silence is hot right now. On the market, it takes the form of headphones, train compartments, dishwashers, vaccum cleaners, and a whole lot of other products that have taken the absence of sound and packaged it up for capitalistic consumption. Not to say that there is necessarily anything wrong with this–but how does it reflect […]

What would Plato Tweet?

With cerebral momentum from yesterday’s post on why philosophy won’t go away, let’s move on to another question raised by the same author, Rebecca Goldstein: what would Plato Tweet? Goldstein likens the modern social media attention-seeking frenzy to the ancient Greek striving for kleos, which, as students will remember from CC101, is somewhat equivalent to “glory”. […]

Ascending to the Heavens in a Claustrophobic Box

Apparently, elevators have been much more essential to the development of our modern nation’s urban layout and cultural life than we ever thought to give them credit for. As the elevator enthusiasts of academia maintain, the invention of the elevator paved the way for a new, innovative high-rise style of architecture. Not only this, but elevators have […]

On Marshall Berman, Marxist Intellectual of New York

Last fall, Marshall Berman, a Jewish American philosopher, Marxist humanist writer and professor of political science at The City College of New York, passed away. Vladislav Davidzon writes about his late teacher in Tablet Magazine, painting a portrait of him as a brilliant nonconformist and engaging teacher: In hindsight, I am impressed by how neatly […]

Keeping Kids Awake in the Classroom