Category: Uncategorized

Critiquing Picasso

To provide a comprehensive, honest profile of an artist can be a demanding task, to say the least, especially to create an unbiased, even critical profile of someone so loved and honored. Especially someone as complicated and genius as Picasso. That is exactly what John Banville believes TJ Clark is capable of doing as Banville […]

The Downsides of Everyone Being a Critic

Not everyone is as lucky as those of us in Core. Very few can boast such an encompassing grasp of great works as we can; even less learn how to talk about these works, yet we, also, are able to hold a conversation with the best of them concerning Suicide, The Republic, any of the […]

Dante For Kids

Recently, someone had the idea that if Dante’s description of an eternal blazing netherworld were reprinted in comic sans, alongside understandably disturbing yet cartoonish illustrations, it might be more accessible to children. Consequently, a series of picture books based on Dante’s Divine Comedy, titled “Dante for Fun”, was published. Originally in Italian, the books simplify each of […]

Famous Winters and Famous Symphonies

As February continues to barrage us with snow and ice, cold winds and cloudy skies, it can seem to many of us, especially those from warmer climes, that winter will never end, the snow will never melt, the days will never grow longer. At such a time, it can be nice to get a little […]

Beethoven’s 9th Symphony

Today students in CC202 will be treated with a lecture on Beethoven by the Boston Conservatory’s Professor Elizabeth Seitz. Here are two excellent performances of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony: Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Abbado conduting the Berlin Philharmonic All are welcome to come to the lecture in CAS B12 at 12:30 pm today to enjoy […]

The Advantages of a BU ID

A Boston University student ID has always had the power to get you in to the MFA for free, but just this semester, you can go the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum as well! Now that’s good enough of an incentive for most of us, but for the few unconvinced, here’s a brief article that might […]

I Bet You Thought Neil DeGrasse Tyson Was the World’s Richest Astrophysicist

I like my progressive/arena/opera rock the way I like my education: Far-reaching in the realms of content and style, influenced by timeless masters of the past, and damn groovy. I write of the latter in reference to an integral part of the CC105 curriculum; that is, learning to bump to Professor Alan Marscher’s sweet, sweet […]

Call Me Burroughs: A Life

In the 1930′s, William S. Burroughs spent a good four years in our beautiful city of Boston. Bookforum recently reviewed Barry Miles’ biography of the author, titled Call Me Burroughs: A Life. Here is an extract: William S. Burroughs lived the kind of life few contemporary American novelists seek to emulate. A roll call of his sins: He […]

Blood Making Its Comeback

Few people were as obsessed with blood as the Ancient Romans. Their main form of entertainment, for instance, involved the violent, dramatic deaths of gladiators, and of course their empire was filled with the blood of enemies. These days, it’s a bit less acceptable to force people to fight for the death so you can […]

Listening to Poetry

Listening to a poem can change everything. As you’ve read before on the Core Blog, James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake seems much less incomprehensible when Joyce is reading it. But what about poetry, so focused on the language and word play, frequently taking at least three readings to understand fully? Yeah, listening to those read can […]